Month: March 2014

6 Amazing Analog Things My iPhone Has Replaced — And I Kinda Miss

While organizing the basement, I uncovered several old, beloved analog things that made me realize just how amazing our iPhones are, and how much has changed. Yet, there are some knobs and levers that still work better. Like all things in life, striking the balance of old and new technology is key. Now, to get those Super 8 films converted to digital… 1. Super 8 Camera. Our family Super 8 captured lots of fun moments as well as my brothers creative stop-action animation. And we never had to worry about recharging — we just wound up the motor. 2. Boombox. My boombox from the 1990s, complete with CD player! At the time, it was the slickest thing on the block. 3. Rabbit ear antenna. From way back in the analog days — even the TV could “go to eleven.” 4. Accordion.  I’m still desperately trying to learn how to play. Luckily, there’s an app for that. 5. A 45″ single. A song by Style 32 (my brother’s band) from 1982, entitled “She’s a Digital Girl But It’s an …

Your Weekend TueDo List: Books, Apps, Beauty and More

READ Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time. Author Brigid Schulte describes how between work, kids and home duties, her life is frantic and harried; anyone who feels “the overwhelm,” as Schulte calls it (women in particular) will understand exactly what she means. An award-winning journalist, Schulte throws herself into research and learns that women have never been expected to have leisure time — or if they do, it’s been assigned to moments like waiting in line, doing chores and holding on the phone. We love how she breaks down the structures that keep us from owning time for play and teaches us how to take our time back. ($19, Amazon.com) BUY Chantecaille Save the Bees Palette. This new eye and cheek palette — which features four on-trend spring shades — is a (decidedly un-digital) buy that you can feel good about. Five percent of proceeds will be donated to The Xerces Society, a non profit organization that helps protect invertebrates and their habitat, including those very important pollinators. The palette contains …

Why I’m in Love with a Luddite

The night I met my husband in the bar on 15th street, back in 2001, I was ready and eager to punch his phone number into whatever Palm Pilot-like object was trendy and in my bag. He wouldn’t give it to me. Instead, he wrote my first name on a napkin, slipped it in his pocket, and asked me to meet him, same time, same place, four days later. I did. He did. No texts, alerts or mobile carriers required. At the end of our first date I asked for his email address. Again, he declined. He said he didn’t want to get to know me on the computer, through grammatically sub-par notes sent during office breaks or business meetings. He wanted to get to know me, in real-time and in real life. This all seemed highly suspect. Who was this guy? Was he on the lam? Married? Why so cagey? I couldn’t get it into my head that his avoidance of technology might have motives based in anything but malice. But he was charming, …

Remotely Challenged: My Technological Struggle to Watch TV

At the risk of irretrievably dating myself, I remember a time in my childhood home when we had to get up to change the channel. There were precisely six channels to choose from, so unless you were really unhappy with the program you were watching, you might just grin and bear Perry Mason or Hee Haw. Then, the most important innovation of the modern age found its way into my young hands: the TV remote, an absolute revelation in that it allowed you to cycle through your limited options…while laying on your ass! I cherished my remote as one would a puppy, keeping it groomed and fed (with big batteries), and protecting it from my older brother’s grimy hands as best I could. My pet was brown and surprisingly heavy and you had to aim well and push down hard on his buttons to make things happen, so even though you could stay put, you still needed to earn each channel change. [pullquote]I readily admit to be electronically challenged and blissfully ignorant about issues such …

Books to Enhance Your Green Thumb

Much of my life that remains analog is abetted by the internet. If I want to cook old-school braised short ribs, I can order all of the ingredients online for doorstep delivery. My shelves are groaning with paper books that I’ve ordered from web sites. I can also order seeds and plants online for that most analog of activities: gardening. Yes, there are tools for gardening, both hi- and low-tech, including lawn mowers, trowels and software to organize your annuals and perennials. But eventually, every gardener has to get her hands dirty. Thank goodness! Talk about connecting with something elemental. So my frontlist pick for you this week is Mister Owita’s Guide to Gardening: How I Learned the Unexpected Joy of a Green Thumb and an Open Heart by Carol Wall. Wall’s memoir of her slow, enriching friendship with a neighbor’s Kenyan gardener is the kind of book that sounds too sweet but winds up being just right. Giles Owita has more to share with Wall than plant advice, and Wall has more to give …

Analog

Margit’s Note: The Analog Issue

  “Why do you pet the glowing thing more than you pet me?” says my cat, as I swipe my iPhone. (Seriously, she tells me with her furrowed kitty brow.) Earlier this month, on the National Day of Unplugging, I spent 5 whole minutes wondering if I could embark on a digital detox. Let me text this to you: “Nope.”  As last week’s New Yorker piece “The Pointlessness of Unplugging” argued, “Few who unplug really want to surrender their citizenship in the land of technology; they simply want to travel outside it on temporary visas.” Because there is obvious benefit to our e-lives — from expedient access to data to the ability to order dinner without ever moving from this chair. And as Gen-X era women, we find ourselves betwixt and between the analog and the digital: we took a typewriter to college and maybe ended it — or started our first job — with an email account. We mix and match our lives — post-it reminders mingle with our favorite To Do app (mine …

My Journals Knew I Was an Alcoholic Before I Did

For many years I wrote nightly in a journal, with a pen and a bound book of beautiful empty pages, which I filled fast and furiously before bed. Then one day, I stopped. As near as I can figure, this quitting occurred around the time Wifi came into my life and my apartment. Instead of bringing my journal into bed with me, I brought my laptop. And while I’m pretty sure I simply meant to shift my personal reflections to the digital writing device I was now using so often, clearly I was an analog-only journaler. It was in 2007 — ironically, the same year I started a Facebook account — that my 20-year journaling career came to a screeching halt. I realized this a few weeks ago, while organizing boxes in my stuffed-to-the-max storage unit. I found one filled with all of my old journals; writing that began in the 8th grade and went right through my 32nd birthday. There were more than 30 various notebooks in that box, of all different shapes, colors and sizes. …

Four Lovably Lo-Fi Celebrations and One Tech-Savvy Refutation

In which we explore the filmic concerns of a given theme, and find new and novel ways of putting together yet another Internet-based list of movies. The wrinkle here, is our fifth pick will actually serve to prove as the counter argument, the best representation of the direct opposite of our theme. 1. Brazil (1985) Director: Terry Gilliam Gist: In a sad Orwellian future adrift in bureaucracy, Sam Lowry (Jonathan Pryce) gets mistaken for a terrorist rebel and is ensnared in a would-be rebellion, while finally meeting and trying to protect the beautiful woman (Kim Greist) of his dreams. Offensive Technology: The whole damn system is a giant, bureaucratic disaster, with endless offices and committees and piles of paperwork that just confuses everybody and leads to glaring inefficiency and ineptitude. To make matters worse, the technology of the future is always breaking down at the worst possible moments, and seems barely functional when it does operate. Counter Argument: Not much to be said here. The future in Terry Gilliam’s brilliantly realized satire is a very familiar …

Your Weekend TueDo List: Anita Hill, Cloak App, Hollie Cook and Jem!

Yes, yes we know — we deliver every Tuesday. Well, sometimes we just can’t wait. To that end, here are a few cool things to check out this weekend. WATCH Anita. In 1991, Anita Hill was everything. As young, working, college-age women, we were glued to our TV sets as she testified to sexual harassment charges levied against soon-to-be associate justice of the Supreme Court. Poised, though reluctant, Hill fast became the one on trial, and it sparked new discussion about what was and wasn’t okay in the workplace. This documentary takes us inside the events of the trial, how Antia has lived life since (she’s “moved on” as a professor at Brandeis University), and her impact on a new generation of young women. The documentary opens today, March 21, and Women’s Action Media is also hosting viewings of the film. LISTEN & PRE-ORDER Twice by Hollie Cook. Ready for the cold snap to snap the hell out? We sure are. Warm up with a sneak peak at Hollie Cook’s latest, tropically buoyant, Twice — bound to be your summer …

Why I Share My Closet with Other Women — The Story of Gwynnie Bee

“I’d size down, for sure — it runs big,” says Mara, a Gwynnie Bee staffer. She sits behind a makeshift checkout table eyeing me as I hold up a sheer, floral-patterned top. “We’re about the same size I think?” I’m trying on a handful of shirts, at bargain basement prices, here at Gwynnie Bee’s 2nd anniversary party in founder Christine Hunsicker’s Manhattan apartment. I can’t resist a good deal. More often I’m perusing online, on Gwynnie Bee’s near-revolutionary shopping site for plus-sized women. The two-year-old company (three if you count the years Hunsicker spent conceiving it) is like Netflix for clothing; your “closet” is akin to your “queue.” You choose a one-10-piece-out-at-a-time plan and closet the clothes you like. (Yes, in the GB community parlance, “closet” is used as a verb.) When you’re done wearing an item, you toss it back in a USPS, pre-postage-paid blue bag they provide (no washing necessary) and they’ll ship you your next item. They launder everything meticulously and retire clothing when it’s even slightly worn, so if you don’t mind …

The Etiquette of Social Media Sharing (i.e. How Not to Be a Content-Stealing Jerk)

These days, we live to share. With the click of a button we’re instantly sharing posts, tweets, photos, videos and screenshots. But often when we share, we’re not following good social media etiquette. For example, some platforms (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) enable us to easily credit the originator of the content we’re sharing; others not so much. As a result — and often unintentionally — proper attribution of the shared content becomes entirely lost or worse, incorrectly ascribed. I’ve seen some cases where people intentionally pass other people’s work off as their own, and other cases where a sharer doesn’t mean to steal, but just doesn’t know how to properly credit the content. So instead, he or she does nothing. There are a few simple things you can do when sharing other people’s content that not only will show you’re practicing good #SMEtiquette, but will endear you to the people whose content you’re sharing. All it takes is a little extra time and attention. And if you give credit where credit’s due, you might just find …

There’s A Special Place in Hell For Women Who “Hate” Other Women

A friend of mine recently linked to an article and added an emphatic notation of “Yes!” The article was called “Recline, Don’t ‘Lean In’ (Why I Hate Sheryl Sandberg)” and I have to be honest with you — I haven’t been this disappointed in some time. As women, we struggle every day to find our paths, to find a route that will lead us to success while still allowing us to still be present in our own lives. That path is often littered with land mines, debris and many other enormous and exhausting obstacles. That’s why taking time out of your day to publicly “hate” a person for doing something — ANYTHING — to help other women who are navigating the murky waters of work/life balance is so audacious, so counterproductive, and frankly, so very petty. Rosa Brooks’ “problem” with Sandberg is that after reading Lean In, she felt she needed to do more in the workplace, so she increased her responsibilities, worked longer hours and ultimately sacrificed her personal life to get ahead in …

On Becoming a Writer Who Writes

Until about a month ago, I was a writer who didn’t write. That may seem like a strange admission from someone who has made her living as a writer for the past 25 years, but it’s true in a fundamental way. Yes, I’ve edited thousands of articles and written a couple of hundred during my years at Time Inc., Worth and Working Mother magazines. I’ve created pages upon pages of content for dozens of websites and written countless pieces of marketing materials over the past couple of decades. But until recently, I never shared a real piece of myself with a reader. I rarely wrote about things that moved me at my core and even when I did, in my head, there was too much at stake to share those personal reflections. There are many, many writers in the writers-who-don’t-write club (you know who you are), some with a modicum of talent, some with an extraordinary amount. Whatever our skill level, we may as well have zero aptitude and not a thing to say if …

11 Things My Husband Taught Me About Sharing

It took me almost two years to say “we” instead of “I” after I got married. It wasn’t that I didn’t think of myself as part of a couple; it was that I’d been single for so long, living blissfully in bachelorette apartments and eating whatever I wanted whenever I wanted, listening to whatever music I fancied, going out whenever I pleased, and decorating with a personal flair that took no one else’s tastes into consideration. I had no concept of “share.” Worse, I’d been an only child. I’d had no siblings vying for scarce resources. My parents only had to clothe, feed and educate one ankle biter. That is, until I was 13, and my brother came along, much to my horror. I found that the full-on attention and cooing I’d been accustomed to my entire life was now diluted by an interloper. Still, I was about to enter high school, and the arrival of this caboose meant that I would have a certain amount of independence, and diminished scrutiny that most teenagers would …

Four Very Giving Films and One Stingy Bastard

In which we explore the filmic concerns of a given theme, and find new and novel ways of putting together yet another Internet-based list of movies. The wrinkle here, is our fifth pick will actually serve to prove as the counter argument, the best representation of the direct opposite of our theme. 1. Adore (2013) Director: Anne Fontaine Gist: Two beautiful women who have been friends all their lives (Naomi Watts and Robin Wright), fall for each other’s sons (Xavier Samuel and James Frecheville) over the course of a single, tumultuous summer. Shared Benevolence: That would be the sons Ian (Samuel) and Tom (Frecheville). Simultaneously aghast and compelled, Lil (Watts) and Roz (Wright) cross social and moral boundaries in pursuit of their hearts’ desires, hanging the potential damage it could wreck to their friendship and the world around the boys. End Result: As you can imagine, things don’t go terribly well with this scenario. By the end, petty jealousies end up more or less blowing up everyone’s lives, and no one really gets what he/she might …

Margit’s Note: Sharing is Caring

“Sharing is caring!” My college dorm neighbor used to say that all the time — usually with the goal of bumming a cigarette from my roommate. (Or a funny cigarette.) These days, we live in a world where “sharing” has taken on new meaning; tinged with concerns of privacy or projects for a collective benefit. On a daily, if not minute by minute basis, we share our favorite news stories, baby photos, cat videos, and bizarrely niche Buzzfeed quizzes (“Which Willy Wonka Character Are You?” — I am Violet Beauregarde, obvs.) But we’re also sharing resources to get a great deal — our cars, our clothes and our homes as hotels. As we share, are we communicating more effectively? Being good to our fellow humans? That’s the question this week as we tackle stories of sharing — and oversharing. Jody Jones asks when sharing becomes TMI I investigate the world of the sharing economy via Gwynnie Bee Katharine English learns to share with her husband — and tells you how you can too! Rebecca Fernandez offers the art of constructive criticism …

38 Women Over 38 Who Inspire Us

  We’ve got your “30 Under 30” right here. No, actually, we don’t. With all of the “30 under 30,” “20 under 20” lists, we thought we’d do something a little different and honor some women on the flip side. In this special two-week issue, we’re high-fiving women who happen to be above the age of 38 and are doing amazing things with their lives (note: we still love you too 20-somethings). To that end, we asked our 25+ TueNight contributors and colleagues to select 38 women they are inspired by and tell us why — which makes this list a little different from most of the “Top 100 lists” that are out there. It’s wholly subjective, based completely on the person who nominated the listee. This piece came to life through the combined efforts of more than 25 authors  — all of whom are different, just like the women that make up this list. Our nominees are famous and not famous. They are trailblazers, laughmakers, rulebreakers, mentors and heroes. Someone our contributors simply admire. …

Your Weekend TueDo List: A Between Two Ferns Primer, Beck and Pi

Yes, yes we know — we deliver every Tuesday. Well, sometimes we just can’t wait. To that end, here are a few of the things we’re browsing, viewing and can’t wait to watch. Enjoy your weekend! WATCH Between Two Ferns. Now that President Obama has graced his presence on Between Two Ferns (to plug the Affordable Care Act), the Funny or Die “interview” show, hosted by an intentionally disinterested and nasty Zach Galifianakis, is no longer a semi Internet secret. But we at TueNight have been fans since the show’s inception, and if you haven’t had a chance to peruse past interviews, we suggest taking a trip down the Fern rabbit hole. Make sure not to miss our favorite gems: This bungled Q&A with good sport Jon Hamm; Steve Carell’s hilarious “I’m onto you” turn; Sean Penn’s unfortunate experience with Zach’s southern brother, Seth; the already cranky Ben Stiller (and his horror when he learns of Mr. Galifianakis’s email addy); and of course, Zach’s two-part 2013 Oscar special. BEAUTIFY Sephora Radiant Orchid Makeover. If you want …

Arts, Books & Culture: Women Who Inspire Us

[column size=”one-third”] ISABELLA ROSSELLINI By Robin Marshall “Now 61 (and still stunning), she has found a way to combine her love of science and theater in a series of spectacular short films.”… Read about why she inspires us [/column] [column size=”one-third”] [/column] [column size=”one-third” last=”true”] JHUMPA LAHIRI By Savita Iyer “So many other writers lay the metaphors on thick and try to impress with dazzling language and complex turn of phrase, but Lahiri’s work is the writing equivalent of a perfect Picasso; a few strokes of genius on a blank sheet — and voila.”… Read about why she inspires us [/column]   [column size=”one-third”] DONNA TARTT By Bethanne Patrick “No wonder some novels are in gestation for a decade! Donna reminds me, as both a writer and a reader, that to take the long way home is not simply acceptable, but often advisable..”… Read about why she inspires us   [/column] [column size=”one-third”] MARJANE SATRAPI By Savita Iyer “Her drawings hit home on so many levels for me…  being the only girl with thick, dark body hair in the …

Food & Health: Women Who Inspire Us

[column size=”one-third”] Naomi Starkman By Kim O’Donnel “She dishes up a daily serving of news and commentary to help the rest of us make sense of how our food is grown, raised and politicized.”… Read about why she inspires us [/column] [column size=”one-third”] Pati Jinich By Letisha Marrero “This Latina mother of three boys had the cojones to switch careers mid-life, pursue her passion doggedly, all the while making people pine for her culinary creations.”… Read about whys she inspires us [/column] [column size=”one-third” last=”true”] Alex Raij By Dori Fern “Her favorite part about being a well-seasoned chef is that she has become a better teacher and mentor to her staff: ‘The older you get, the more you realize you need help.’”… Read about why she inspires us [/column] [column size=”one-third”] Dr. Deborah Cohen By Suzanne Rust “Who stages a dance party before they’re scheduled for a double mastectomy? Dr. Deborah Cohan had the whole operating room laughing and shaking it to Beyoncé’s “Get Me Bodied” before her surgery.”… Read about why she inspires us [/column] [column size=”one-third” last=”true”] Celeste Corcoran …

Money & Business: Women Who Inspire Us

[column size=”one-third”] SALLIE KRAWCHEK By Nicole Hamilton “Instead of retreating in the face of adversity, Sallie found a brilliant next move — helping other women build a ladder up and learn new skills together.”… Read about why she inspires us [/column] [column size=”one-third”] LISA SERVON By Amy S. Choi “New thinking about the urban poor and financial services is (duh) important and supremely relevant, and she’s doing it smartly and respectfully.”… Read about why she inspires us [/column] [column size=”one-third” last=”true”] JANE BARRATT By Jessica Randazza “I admire her ability to methodically pivot in to her own venture, away from those big companies, and focus in on something she believes in. And having pursued a similar path (agency gal now at a fintech startup focused on investments, no less), it wasn’t until I heard Jane’s story that made me stop and think for the first time, “What am I doing to determine my own financial success?” Keep reading… Read why Jane inspires us   [/column]   [hr] SEE MORE IN 38 OVER 38: Arts, Books & Culture …

Style & Design: Women Who Inspire Us

[column size=”one-third”] Jamyla Bennu By Patrice Grell Yursick “Jamyla inspires me to be my best self, to always exercise my right to create, to put my ideas out there in whatever medium I can and to find delight and joy in the everyday aspects of life.” Read about why she inspires us [/column] [column size=”one-third”] Isabel Marant By Susan Linney “I’m amazed at how she started so small and made it so big, purely as a result of her own uncompromising, off-the-cuff style; an ahead-of-its time look that we now see everywhere.” Read about why she inspires us [/column] [column size=”one-third” last=”true”] Tina Roth Einsenberg By Margit Detweiler “Tina has said she believes in “taking your personal projects seriously“ and “labors of love because labors of love always pay off.” Read about why she inspires us [/column] [column size=”one-third”] Deborah Berke By Rudabeh Pakravan “Deborah’s command of an elegant yet restrained design aesthetic has allowed her to create timeless and rich spaces that celebrate the inhabitants and context as much as the architecture.” Read about why …

Music & TV: Women Who Inspire Us

[column size=”one-third”] JONATHA BROOKE By Tamar Anitai “Her songs have been a mantra and a siren, pulling me back into myself, reminding me that even in our darkest moments there’s someone out there who’s held their breath and weathered the storm, too..”… Read about why she inspires us [/column] [column size=”one-third”] SARAH SILVERMAN By Daniella Latham “There was brilliance in what Sarah was doing: She took on a well-defined audience segment and served proactive solutions to encourage a presidential vote..”… Read about why she inspires us [/column][column size=”one-third” last=”true”] ALI WENTWORTH By Margit Detweiler “Her videos were so unflinchingly honest, funny and confused. She’d captured that feeling we all have as we age, aka WHAT’S HAPPENING TO MY BODY? And, if I can fix it , should I? Read about why she inspires us [/column] [column size=”one-third”] SHARON JONES By Margit Detweiler “Flickering like a live wire across the stage, wearing a short, shimmery dress, she kicked off her heels and delivered more funk and grit than you can imagine..”… Read about why she inspires us [/column] [column …

Science, Technology, Engineering, Math: Women Who Inspire Us

[column size=”one-third”] By Amy Vernon “Reshma [was inspired to found Girls Who Code] because she found fewer girls in technology education at every level, no matter their socioeconomic status.” Read about why she inspires us [/column] [column size=”one-third”] By Eleanor Hong “Motoko Hunt breaks the myth that Google has all the answers and that 
all your friends are on Facebook..”… Read about why she inspires us [/column][column size=”one-third” last=”true”] By  Jody Jones ” Just a few days after Anousheh Ansari [turned 40] became the first private female space explorer and the first Iranian in space.”   Read about why she inspires us [/column]     [column size=”one-third”] By Kara Silverman “She left earth! That’s inspiring enough for me.” Read about why she inspires us [/column] [column size=”one-third”] [hr] SEE MORE IN 38 OVER 38: Arts, Books & Culture Food & Health Media & News Music & TV Politics & Activism Style & Design Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Editor’s Note: 38 Women Over 38 Who Inspire Us   [/column]    

Women Who Inspire: Dr. Mae Jemison

            NAME: Mae Jemison AGE: 57 OCCUPATION: Physician, former NASA Astronaut, and the Principal for the 100 Year Starship Foundation WHO SHE IS: Well, for starters, Mae Jemison was the first African-American woman to travel into space. So she’s a literally and figuratively a barrier breaker. Born in Decatur, Alabama, the seriously studious Jemison moved to Chicago as a young child, was an honor student in high school and was accepted to Stanford University at the tender age of 16. She gradated with a B.S. in chemical engineering and a B.A. in African and Afro-American Studies. Although first her application to NASA was turned down, she was accepted in 1987 after submitting her second. Before her history-making shuttle launch in 1992, Jemison worked at the Kennedy Space station in Florida, doing tasks such as verifying software and help launch vehicle.­ Jemison resigned from NASA in 1993, and went on to pursue numerous ventures. She was a professor of Environmental Studies at Dartmouth College from 1995 to 200o, and is currently a Professor-at-Large at Cornell University. WHY SHE INSPIRES …

Women Who Inspire: Jane Barratt

NAME: Jane Barratt AGE:  44 OCCUPATION: Founder, Vested Interest WHO SHE IS: Jane Barratt is a seasoned advertising and digital marketing professional with more than 20 years of incredible experience. Working for some of the biggest brands in the globe, Jane has brought to life incredible and inspiring programs while leading large agencies and practices for Havas, Sapient, Young & Rubicam, and most recently, mcgarrybowen. While there, she served as the International Chief Operations Officer for a variety of cultures, categories and countries. Throughout her varied experiences, Jane recognized one  common thread among each of the companies she worked for — their strong commitment to customers and shareholders. Jane was empowered by that realization, and saw a tremendous opportunity for loyal customers of these big brands to go a step further and buy shares in the companies they bought from most frequently. Her new company, Vested Interest, will help do exactly that when it launches this spring. Jane’s mission is extraordinary — to build a tool to inspire and educate customers with no financial experience on how to …

Women Who Inspire: Ali Wentworth

                  NAME: Ali Wentworth AGE: 49 OCCUPATION: Comedian, Actress, Author, Producer WHO SHE IS: Alexandra “Ali” Wentworth is a study in comic incongruities: the WASP-y blonde daughter of Mabel “Muffie” Cabot, Nancy Regan’s press secretary… and a salty-mouthed comedian known for her Cher and Amy Buttafuco impersonations on In Living Color. The wife of ABC’s respected anchor George Stephanopoulos… and someone who likes to surprise him by jumping on tables on Good Morning America. A mother of two and an actress who’s appeared in films like Jerry Maguire, Office Space and It’s Complicated and a woman who publicly takes us on her plastic-surgery quest for a less puffy pair of eyes. Some first fell for Ali as “schmoopy” on Seinfeld. My introduction to Ali, however, was through her two-season stint as the creator and star of Head Case, a gone-too-soon Starz original. Ali played the worst, most self-centered shrink-to-the-stars you’d ever meet — quirky, cringeworthy and hilarious. You can catch up on YouTube — highly recommend it. …

Women Who Inspire: Anousheh Ansari

                  NAME: Anousheh Ansari AGE: 47 OCCUPATION: Engineer; Cofounder, Chairwoman, and CEO of Prodea Systems WHO SHE IS: What a 40th birthday present! Just a few days after Anousheh Ansari rolled into that monumental age, she rocketed into the stratosphere and became the first private female space explorer and the first Iranian in space. And while that eight days in space may have earned her worldwide acclaim, it’s her work on terra firma that proves her a woman to watch. Born in Iran, Anousheh emigrated to the US with her family as a teen, speaking no English. Now she speaks Persian as well as English — and French — and has a functional knowledge of Russian (for space travel, of course!). Having worked in the entrepreneurial engineering space for almost two decades, she is a holder of three patents. Anousheh is the former CEO/Co-Founder of Telecom Technologies, a pioneer in the VoIP space. But what I love most? She founded the What If? Prize Competition in an effort to …