Month: September 2014

Why I Want My Son to Be a Feminist

As a parent, one of your strongest instincts is to protect your children from harm or hurt, physical or emotional. My grade-school-age daughter came home one day and looked a little glum. I asked her what happened. “I wanted to play kickball with the boys,” she said. “But one of them said that girls couldn’t play.” My own school days started coming back to me in a flash. “Did you ask him why girls couldn’t join the game?” I asked. “Did the other boys stand up for you?” “He said that girls couldn’t play well enough. I’m a good player, Mom! And no, the other boys just snapped in line. They decided I could be the referee.” [pullquote]My son noticed that something unfair was going on, and though he had the wrong word for it, knew inherently that it was discriminatory.[/pullquote] My son, who is a year younger than his sister, was listening to our exchange. He looked up from doing his homework. And said: “He’s just racist.” My daughter looked at me with raised …

How Do We Get More Women in Office? Ask Them To Run

Think about it. You probably know at least few women who would be incredible in political or civic office — whether on a local council, state senate or heck, POTUS. But let’s slow our roll.  Baby steps. I easily rattled around a few in my brain and sent three “Invitation Nation” postcards — a campaign to encourage 500,000 women to run and lead by 2016. Took me five minutes. As I was writing this piece, one of them responded. First she wrote, “Are you crazy? I can barely surface for air.” And then the next day, she sent me another email. “You know, maybe you’re not crazy.” Ask a woman to run for office? As simple as sending a postcard — that’s one of the promises of VoteRunLead, a national, nonpartisan organization that “unleashes the power of women leaders in democracy through training, technology and community.” Simply put, if you’re interested, they’ll get you there. Originally, VoteRunLead was the training arm of The White House Project, a program which prepared over 15,000 women for civic …

5 Bands Who Represent the New Power in Pop Music

Power pop, power chords, powerhouse vocals, “The Power Of Love” — music has myriad ways to flip the switch. Here are five artists who are honing and, in some cases, redefining what the idea of power in pop music means. 1. EX HEX There are some days when only the power of classic rock can save you—thanks to its big chords, hip-shaking beats, and long-hair-don’t-care swagger. The Washington, D.C. trio Ex Hex—made up of Betsy Harris, Mary Timony, and Laura Wright—gets this. Their debut Rips (Merge), out next week, takes rock and roll’s biggest ideas and compresses them into shiny pop gems, dismissing the wanky tendencies of certain rock-radio staples while audibly delighting in those tropes that put the pedal to the metal—juicy solos, sticky hooks, oh-oh-oh backing vocals.   2. SLEATER-KINNEY Timony is an indie lifer; before she formed Ex Hex, she was in the supergroup Wild Flag. That quartet also counted among its members Carrie Brownstein and Janet Weiss from the Pacfiic Northwest guitar-guitar-drums trio Sleater-Kinney, whose assaultive take on postpunk showed one way that …

You Can’t Play Drums in a Dress

I was never a girly-girl. To hear my mother tell it, there were no pants tough enough to escape my wrath —  there’d be holes in the knees the first day out. She could buy Danskins or Levis. No matter. I despised sitting still.  I had to chase and run and climb. I  couldn’t help climbing that tree. I had to. Oh, that tree. It was a weeping willow. I’d climb to the second perch and it was exactly perfect for reading and hanging out.  Exactly perfect. Even now, all these years later, I can close my eyes and be in that tree. I can feel the way the branches came together to make me a nest. I can smell the fresh, leafy scent and the faint aroma from the stream down the hill. My parents let me be exactly who I was. They didn’t assign gender roles. Sure, I had Barbies, but I also played with the Erector Set and Incredible Edibles. I was not the little girl who played dress up and planned …

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Power Sources and Powerful Forces: Books from Stein and Seuss

My father, a civil engineer, worked at our local power plant for most of my youth, moving to the power company’s headquarters in glamorous Poughkeepsie when I was a teen. His position there was as a sort of energy-saving czar; he was eco and green at a corporate level long before bigger companies established their environmental divisions and initiatives. I tell you this so you’ll understand both where my mind goes when I hear the word “power,” and also why the Front-list title I’ve selected this week piqued my curiosity. Growing up, my father (and my mother, too) constantly exhorted me to turn off lights, use less water, not waste paper and return every can and bottle. In an era when their friends were busy filling trash cans with bottles of Canadian Club, my parents practiced rigorous recycling. They knew, intuitively, that a time would come when everyone would have to pay the price of squandered resources. In A Sudden Light, the new novel from Garth Stein (The Art of Racing in the Rain), that …

Margit’s Note: Flick on the Switch

We turn on the light and we don’t think much about it. Behind that switch plate are wires that run through the wall, out to the street, on to a power plant where the power is generated. There’s a source, but we never really see it. That is until things go dark, the power shuts down and we’re fumbling around for flashlights. Where does this little switch go anyway? We often think about power as the switch, winning an election, making SVP. But there’s a complex network feeding that power, a network of knowledge, access, money, strength. A light goes off, we’re caught off guard and we realize we need to investigate — and challenge — the mechanisms that prevent us from power. That’s Feminism. Challenging and confronting a powerful network that keeps us from making more than 71 percent of what men make, feeling safe and secure when we walk out the door, or even playing baseball. Hey, Mo’ne. Because if you’re the best player out there, you should be on the team. This week we’re feeling the …

The TueDo List: Beer, Ello, New TV and Selfies

If there is a time for vices it’s the weekend. Work-free, ideally. Fun-centered, hopefully. And whatever your proclivities happen to be, it’s always the best time to find partners in crime — even if it’s just for a late-night ice cream run. We approve. Drink If you’re a beer fan, this is the best weekend of the year to get out (safely, please — don’t drive) and enjoy some brews with literally millions of others. The ultimate beer celebration — Oktoberfest — runs until October 5 in Munich, where it’s a full-fledged family celebration including masses and gun salutes. Many cities in the U.S. borrow this tradition with beer parties of their own. There are so many we’re suggesting you hit up the Beer Advocate events calendar to see what’s going on near you. Ello If the need to be on every single social media platform — and spend extensive time in the great indoors lit only by the glow of your iPhone  — Ello may be your next fix. It just launched this week, …

Taste-Testing Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups — Because I Can

I’m not sure that the consumption of dark chocolate peanut butter cups is quite a vice, but some days when I’m really focused on devouring them, I have to admit it all feels a little shady. My sugar consumption has ramped up since I got sober last year. My body was suddenly robbed of all of the sugar in wine and, um, whatever else I could find. I discovered cupcakes first. I swore that my suddenly very smart car started driving itself directly to the cupcake store. I was so embarrassed by this that I called a friend to discuss it. What adult woman needs a daily cupcake (or three)? Who checks the flavors on Facebook at a specific cupcake store because if you ask for the secret one they’ll give it to you like it’s your birthday? Who considers an empty parking space on a busy street directly in front of the cupcake store a sign from her higher power that she is meant to have one? Who goes broke buying fancy cupcakes — …

Was I Cyber-Snooping on My Spouse?

I’ve been married for such a long time. There were even times — before a recent turn of events — when I wished I could work up even a slight interest in my husband’s shenanigans. His flirting with women, for instance. I’ve always said: the man would flirt with a lamppost. His vast network of female friends. I’ve always said: the man loves the ladies! It’s not that I was so convinced my charms were superior to those of these women (and lampposts). It was just, after all these years of marriage, it didn’t bother me. Or, better said, I trusted him. But that was before Lauren, let’s call her, the PTA president at the high school in our suburban town. She was the wife of a wealthy finance guy, not someone I knew very well. She and my husband were on a committee together, whose meetings were held in the white clapboard parish house on the village green. One evening after work, driving home from the train station, I recalled my husband was at …

What Makes Nuns So Happy?

Spending an inordinate amount of time with Catholic nuns makes you start to worry about your own vices. Nuns take vows of poverty, chastity and obedience to the church and to God, but beyond those, they also live relatively vice-free lives. It isn’t too often that you seen a nun puffing away on a cigarette, sitting at the slots in Atlantic City or doing the things that priests do that so often land them in headlines for the wrong reasons. All in all, Catholic nuns are a pretty chaste bunch. (Though I have known them to occasionally indulge in a glass of good red wine.) I was a different woman when I spent three years researching and writing my latest book, If Nuns Ruled the World. As a successful celebrity journalist, I’d written a critically acclaimed book about the dirty secrets of how famous people make money. (Talk about vices.) Still in my 20s, I was on the cusp of actual adulthood, but still indulging in the pleasures of youth that New York City offers: …

The Penalty for a Bad Habit? The Bad Habit

One of the things that strikes me most, in my study of habits, is the poetic justice of habits. As you may (or may not) remember from your high school English class, “poetic justice” is when a punishment fits the crime. In Dante’s vision of the Ninth Circle of Hell, a fiend punishes the sowers of discord and schism by continually splitting apart their bodies. Or a criminal sets an illegal trap, but then gets caught in the trap himself. There’s a real poetic justice about habits. The reward for a good habit…is the good habit. As Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote, in “New England Reformers,” “The reward of a thing well done is to have done it.” Even more striking is the poetic justice of bad habits. As a friend said to me, “I feel too anxious to tackle my bad habits, but my bad habits are what make me anxious.” One survey found that some women who worry about their finances use “retail therapy” to feel better—they shop in order to cope with their anxiety. Gamblers …

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Forbidden Fruit: Waters & Wharton on the Dark Side of Temptation

Frontlist: The Paying Guests by Sarah Waters Backlist: The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton It’s hard to believe that it was once illegal in nations like our own for consenting adults to engage in same-sex lovemaking. Thank goodness, too, that writers like England’s Sarah Waters are here to remind us of what it was like in more ignorant times when two women could not so much as go out on a date, let alone allow anyone to see them hold hands. Waters has elegantly and eloquently mined her country’s past for historical interstices that highlight how legislation, culture, class, and fashion have affected lesbians of different ages, stations, occupations, and temperaments. In Tipping the Velvet and Fingersmith, Waters created atmospheres of lush Victorian desire, while The Night Watch took place during World War II’s Battle of Britain. The Little Stranger, her bestselling 2010 novel, was a book less about sexuality than suspense, but now, with The Paying Guests, the author returns to her theme of love thwarted by mores and manners. It’s 1922, and …

Margit’s Note: Peccadilloes, Proclivities and Persuasions…

We all have our quirky vice. This week we’re talking about those things you love, crave and are a little — or a lot — naughty. That social cigarette, the daily 24 oz. of coffee you consume (minus the paper cup of course — fist bump to Climate March!), still (still) getting sucked into every season of The Real World, the Nutella you can’t stop eating, because, well, spoon. And a few of us have vices that aren’t so obvious…. Rachel Kramer Bussel sleeps with her clothes on. Laurie White road tests chocolate peanut butter cups. Gretchen Rubin tells us to lighten up about our bad habits. And speaking of habits, Jo Piazza learns happiness from Nuns. Diane di Costanza shares her stalking skills. Bethanne Patrick tempts us with two juicy novels. Jennifer Hill can’t stay out of the sun. And Dina Kaplan gets us to ban the word “busy.” Yes.  Elsewhere… Of course there’s a magazine, tv show and website called Vice. One of our recent favorites from them is a powerful, frightening and well-reported …

The TueDo List: Mash-Ups, Bindercon and the Sound of Our Words

Sounds obvious, but our voice is what makes us unique. The question is, how best to use it? Easiest answer: However you want. It’s yours. Following this week’s theme, we thought we’d share a few unique voice-filled goodies. The Mash-Up Americans The Mash-Up Americans launched Thursday and it’s so good. Co-founders Amy S. Choi and Rebecca Lehrer aim to explore and celebrate all facets of multicultural American life, which has more or less been ignored by mainstream media. Pop culture, food, relationships — and the “real” America as we know it today. Check out Lehrer’s piece, Grab the Bull By the Balls — a look at what happens when your English is really a mash-up language. You can find The Mash-Up Americans on Twitter @mashupamerican and on Facebook at Facebook.com/mashupamericans. In a World Ever heard a female voicing a movie trailer? It’s quite unlikely. Actress Lake Bell wrote and starred in the Sundance award winning comedy In a World, which is about a woman who tries to break through the gender barrier in the film-trailer industry — only to …

5 Amazing Voices in Music Right Now

Pop music is defined by the voice — after all, the communion that a great song provides comes from singing along with lyrics, and not basslines. Here are a few singers making some of the most exciting music of 2014, in large part because of the way their artistic visions and strong voices come together. 1. KIMBRA Her voice blanketed radio in 2011, when she assisted Gotye on his inescapable breakup track “Somebody That I Used To Know.” But The Golden Echo, the second album from this Melbourne-based singer/songwriter/auteur, places Kimbra in the driver’s seat of pop experimentation, and she stretches her voice to its outer limits on the dissonant yet wistful “’90s Music” to the wanting, string-accented “As You Are.” The skating-rink-worthy “Miracle” is a disco jam on which she turns into a yowling, shape-shifting, and utterly joyous diva. 2. ANITA BIAS & AMBER STROTHER The two vocalists who make up the powerhouse R&B trio KING seem to be made for each other, at least as partners in soul—their singing is alternately coy and commanding, …

On Being the Loud Girl

I’m “loud.”  I have been told this many times in my life — in comic ways, in critical ways, in weird, demeaning ways. Suffice it to say that when I speak to a large group, I won’t be needing a microphone, thanks. I project. I credit and blame a combination of genetics and upbringing for my strong voice. My father is a six-foot-one, broad-chested man with a naturally booming manner of speaking. It’s not an effort or intentional, it just comes out of him that way. Combine those inherited vocal cords with being raised in a much more 1950s than 1970s style (speak up when spoken to!) and you have the makings of clear, ringing, direct speech. As a result, I’ve spoken clearly and fully from the chest since I was a kid. I never put on a “cute” voice. I can’t even imitate the infamous “sexy baby” voice that many young women use. I’m certainly able to speak quietly — it’s not like I have some sort of disorder — but at work and …

Day Job: How I Became a Voice-Over Artist

When our own Adrianna Dufay isn’t proofreading, writing an article or publishing our weekly newsletter here on TueNight.com, you might find her in a booth with headphones, talking about a credit card. Or a business summit. As a part-time voice-over artist (and former Off-Broadway actor), her own voice is a key part of her profession. I wondered what that might be like (it sounds like the coolest job ever), so I asked if she’d take some time out of her weekend to tell me. How did you first get into voice-over work? I went to graduate school for acting and when I first moved to New York City, I was recruited by a well-regarded voiceover agent. I came here to act in plays, but those downtown gigs weren’t paying the bills, so I hoped to make some money with my voice.  Turns out you have to (or at least I had to) audition A LOT to book voice-over work. The rule of thumb in the beginning was one booking for every 50 auditions. Since my …

What’s Your Best Public Speaking Trick?

Sweaty palms, butterflies in stomach, clenched throat. For some, giving a talk can be as fun as a root canal and no amount of imagining your audience in their underwear can save you. (Plus, ew.) For others, toasts and TED talks come naturally. But even the most confident speakers usually rely on a trick or two to get them through a presentation. So we asked our contributors, notable pundits and women who regularly speak for a living for their best tips on speaking out loud to a crowd. Let’s Talk About the Weather “Connect right up front and say something in the moment, that you all share — about the room, the day, the weather, what’s going on in the world. You’re inviting them on your ride. As Tip O’Neill once said, ‘All politics is local.’ All public speaking is too!” — Jane Condon, comedian Soft and Smooth “I learned this in one of my acting classes: Right before you walk out in front of an audience, feel and identify the fabric of your clothing: ‘This …

Hello, It’s Me. The Writer’s Voice

A friend called last week to shoot the breeze. After we caught up, the conversation turned to our respective writing projects and he confided that he wished he were more literary.  This man is the author of several books and currently writes a thought-provoking column for a national newspaper. Yet with all his success, here he was expressing dissatisfaction with his writing voice at a fundamental level. I thought about his statement for a moment and tried it on to see how it felt. Did I wish my writing were more literary? In a word: nope. I’m no stranger to self-criticism. But when it comes to my writing voice, I feel solid. I felt even better after reading Delia Ephron’s mini-memoir, Sister Husband Mother Dog: (etc.) It was the first time I’d read anything by her and from the first paragraph, I was hooked. This wasn’t because her writing was particularly beautiful. In fact, her voice is similar to mine, only ten times more experienced and assured. Like Ephron, I often write one word sentences. …

What’s Your System: How I Prepare To Sing

Who: Nora York, New York vocalist and composer. System: Before a show I try and do some yoga, I do my digital pranayama and I take a bath, if I can. I like a bath. And then I usually try and do some kind of meditation. I like to apply my makeup while listening to (the late) Irish tenor John McCormack. I listen to the stuff he recorded with just piano, not with orchestra. Why John McCormack? He has the most clear emotional delivery of singing and I find him incredibly inspiring. Songs like, “Off to Philadelphia in the morning…” LISTEN And then sometimes I’ll listen to Jimi Hendrix. That’s quite different. And now that I’m blind, well, older, I have to wear glasses. But I don’t like to wear them for the stage. So I apply my contact lenses, I have special ones for the stage which are bifocal. And it takes me a really long time to put them in. How long have you been wearing them? I convinced the Chinese optometrist to give them to …

Margit’s Note: Voice Lessons

“It’s amazing how much you can get if you quietly, clearly and authoritatively demand it” That’s a great Meryl Streep quote I’ve had sticky-noted to my bulletin board for a while. At the time she said it (her Golden Globe acceptance speech for The Devil Wears Prada), she was talking about demanding more movie theaters to screen indie films… with an above-the-glasses, Miranda Priestly intonation. But she was also talking about “voice” — that the way we say something can substantially impact our desired outcome.  If I say this quietly, you might have to lean in and listen…. Our voices can also reflect our mood: When I’m pissed, passionate or trying to make a point, I tend to get loud and booming; when I’m nervous or scared my voice scrunches up into a crackly squeak, or doesn’t work at all.  Taking a tip from this week’s collection of public speaking advice, I’m now going to strike the power pose any time I have to say something substantial or feel a-feared. Hands on hips. Here’s what we have to say: Cheryl Botchick wonders if she’s too loud.Jody Jones likes to swear.Susan Linney interviews our friend, the voiceover artist.Nora York prepares …

The Mermaid Tail and Other Stories About Being Different

My 8-year-old daughter asks me if kids teased me at school when I was younger. When I ask her if she is being teased at school, all she will tell me is “sometimes.” Then I wonder: are her classmates teasing her because of her imagination? My daughter has a beautiful and vivid fantasy life. The other day, she was waiting for her mermaid tail to grow because she followed all of the rituals she found in a video to turn herself into a mermaid. When the day her mermaid tail was due came and went, she was unfazed. “We live in a dry climate here in Arizona and that makes it harder to grow a mermaid’s tail,” she explained. “If we lived in San Diego, I’d have one by now.” I agree to buy her a mermaid tail online if her real one didn’t come in soon. “Were you teased when you were in school, Mommy?” “Sometimes I was,” I tell her. “Like people would call me Aliza Pizza.” I don’t tell her about the times …

School Lunch Advice From Your Older Sis

Hiya, Little Sis! How’s tricks? I was thinking about you today while standing in line to sign up for next year’s summer camp. (We’re doing this awesome Lego/Robotics/Stanford-prep thing that I should totally tell you about.) I can’t believe your little guy — my sweet nephew — starts preschool this week. Reminds me when my girls were just starting, before second grade took its toll. Oh, the salad years! I realized there’s a whole school lunch scene that’s kind of intense that you may not know about, and I thought I could give you some advice. I mean, it’s really different from when we were growing up. And since I live in Brooklyn, we’re kind of on the frontlines of a lot of school lunch trends, so maybe my experience can be useful here? I wrote down some stuff for you. 1. Dad makes the lunch. If I were to tell you only one thing, it would be this. These days, that’s his job. I know that’s a little weird because your husband travels a …

Tears of What, Exactly? Taking My Daughter to College

The crying jags started the day my daughter Amira turned 18.  All of her best girlfriends came over for dinner. They are friends she’s had since elementary school, a couple from high school and a few others from camp who came all the way to Brooklyn from upstate New York and Connecticut just to celebrate her birthday. There was a big strawberry shortcake and a strawberry cheesecake, because I couldn’t decide which one to make, and one of her friends made her a headband with a strawberry on top. Strawberries are her favorite. When Amira blew out the candles, I realized this would likely be the last time all these beautiful, wonderful girls would be together.  Girls I’ve watched grow up into women.  I cried watching her blow out the candles, which was sappy and sentimental and I hate being so… obvious, but I couldn’t help myself. Two months and a day later, Amira left before dawn to drive down to college in New Orleans with her father and stepmother and my son. I hugged her …

Betty: Boss of the Bus

Sixty minutes is a long school bus ride, especially when it’s 92 degrees in early September with no air conditioning, the seats are sticky with sweat, and every row is filled with hormonal middle schoolers. That 60 minutes seemed interminable to us, the said middle schoolers. From my 47-year-old vantage point, I know now that it must have seemed even longer to Betty, my middle school bus driver. Our ride was protracted because we were Catholic school kids in rural Southwestern PA. There wasn’t a neighborhood school on every city block. We had to wind our way through several towns and along mountain roads: Possum Hollow Road, Rustic Knob Lane, Fish Hatchery Road, Zion Church Road, Rectory Road. Reminiscing about the street names takes me right back to the mountain environment. Gorgeous wilds, sparse population, and a uniformly Christian citizenry. Not uncommon: the shack with a washer (dish-or-clothes variety) and a couch on the front porch. There was no “as the crow flies” route. The only option was to pack 72 eleven through 13-year olds …

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Marvelous Teachers Still Exist

When you get off the school bus for the first time (which, for most of us in the United States, means arriving for kindergarten), you’re usually greeted by your teacher, who has come to gather up a new set of students for the year. That teacher is also usually female. There are so many reasons for that, ones far beyond the scope of this book column — and that’s why I’m glad Dana Goldstein has written The Teacher Wars: A History of America’s Most Embattled Profession. Goldstein, a scholar with the Marshall Foundation, explains a lot about how teaching became a profession mainly for woman, why teachers unionized and the effect that our culture’s shaping of teachers has on today’s classrooms. The New York Times Book Review piece on The Teacher Wars found it “meticulously fair and disarmingly balanced,” meaning that Goldstein successfully battled her way through a thicket of material without getting caught on any partisan thorns — and the result is a book that successfully reminds the reader that although there are problems …

The Start of School, Once Again…

Once the beginning of September rolls around, TV and newspapers are filled with images of preppy kids in long sleeved shirts, jeans and jackets excitedly taking on great outdoor playgrounds as they go back to school. When one grows up in Arizona, the start of the school year is simply an extended summer — it’s still 110 degrees outside, phys-ed teachers still make you run the half mile regardless of the heat index, and those images of children in long-sleeved clothes are pure fantasy. Just as the summer reached its hottest point, and the world moved as slow as molasses, that was the time that school started again. As a kid, I both loved and dreaded the end of weeknight slumber parties. The new school year was an exciting opportunity to transition another year of life – to grow, learn and stretch. It signified renewal and a chance to embark upon great adventures. By June of the following year, I’d be in an entirely new place and it would seem as though lifetimes had passed. Staples …

Margit’s Note: Can I Sit Here?

I feel a little ill-qualified to discuss this week’s issue. I don’t have little ones going off to school and I very rarely took a school bus. If we couldn’t snag a ride from my Dad, my sister and I usually walked to school, about a 15 minute trudge. We took all kinds of circuitous routes through a golf course, through tennis courts, slowly past the boy’s school, down sidewalk-less streets. We’d sometimes pick up other friends along the way. All of us sporting our magic marker-decorated bookbags, cooly slung over one shoulder. One day my sister and I were walking to school when we noticed the new substitute teacher walking behind us — clearly following us because she was lost. For some mean 14 -and 11-year-old reasoning, we decided to take our craziest route that included a trek through a bramble-filled ravine and a steep incline. As we ran down the rocky hill (the speed helped!) she followed us. When we turned around she was gone. Later that day she showed up to English …

The Trend Trap: A Few Words on Wardrobe Sanity

I wish I could say that I have a wardrobe filled with amazing investment pieces, and that I’ve never fallen prey to one of those “Try the Trend” stories you see in magazines every month. I wish that were true, but it’s not. A quick glance through my closet would reveal a Western shirt from the “Cowboy” trend that was hot a few years ago, which is now gathering dust next to a jeweled sweatshirt for which I paid way too much to look like a casual chandelier. I admit it: sometimes I fall into “The Trend Trap.” It can happen to the best of us — no one is immune. [pullquote]My cashmere coat and I are happy to invite a $25 sweater from H&M to come play for a season.[/pullquote] I’ve identified “The Trend Trap” as a five-part cycle that strikes when you least expect it. Feel free to throw in an “Amen” from the choir loft if any of the following speak to you:   1. You’re vulnerable: One day, for whatever reason, you’re …

What’s With the Damned Scarves?

I am not a fan of winter. Frankly, I’m not a fan of seasons in general. You know those people who “love the seasons!” Those who enjoy the temperature variations, the brisk autumn days, snuggling by the fire in winter, the beautiful blooms of spring. That ain’t me. I like it when it’s warm, period. Ok, I do love boots and sweaters, but only as a necessity for weathering the anti-summer. I do have many beautiful pairs of suede and heavy leather boots that sit and wait for those times of year I have to tolerate the cold. Perhaps I should start wearing them in the summer. Right? I mean, I do love boots, so why not wear them when my spirits are high, the sunshine is overhead, and I can actually come out of the house long enough for people to see and envy them. Hell, no. Which is why I take issue with people who wear scarves in the summer — a phenomenon that appears to be happening more and more. And it’s not just women in bulky …