Author: Katharine English

11 Things My Husband Taught Me About Sharing

It took me almost two years to say “we” instead of “I” after I got married. It wasn’t that I didn’t think of myself as part of a couple; it was that I’d been single for so long, living blissfully in bachelorette apartments and eating whatever I wanted whenever I wanted, listening to whatever music I fancied, going out whenever I pleased, and decorating with a personal flair that took no one else’s tastes into consideration. I had no concept of “share.” Worse, I’d been an only child. I’d had no siblings vying for scarce resources. My parents only had to clothe, feed and educate one ankle biter. That is, until I was 13, and my brother came along, much to my horror. I found that the full-on attention and cooing I’d been accustomed to my entire life was now diluted by an interloper. Still, I was about to enter high school, and the arrival of this caboose meant that I would have a certain amount of independence, and diminished scrutiny that most teenagers would …

Women Who Inspire: Robin Wolaner

NAME: Robin Wolaner AGE: 59 OCCUPATION: CEO, Vittana, a nonprofit that pioneers loans for students in developing countries WHO SHE IS:  She founded the wildly popular and prescient Parenting magazine at the tender age of 31, persuading Time, Inc. to become her partner and marking the publishing giant’s first time ever investing in a joint venture start-up. Just four years later, Time, Inc. bought Wolaner’s share, making her Vice President of its Publishing Ventures division, and a millionaire. It was an unusual story, and remains one of the most popular case studies in the Harvard Business School’s first-year curriculum. Since then, Wolaner has been the COO of CNET, founded baby boomer social networking site TeeBeeDee, and been a bestselling author. WHY SHE INSPIRES  ME: At a time when women were rarely in the C-suites of tech companies, let alone sitting on high-tech boards, Robin paved the way for the rest of us to believe it was possible. I’m pretty certain that Sheryl Sandberg wouldn’t be leaning into Facebook if Robin hadn’t first leaned into CNET. After the Internet bubble imploded on itself, undaunted, …