Author: TueNight Crew

Get Tickets Now! Happy Birthday to Us!

We can hardly believe it’s been five years. But as any TueNighter knows… Age is something to CELEBRATE. For our birthday edition, we’re bringing back excerpts of some of our TueNight faves — from Dodai Stewart bonding with bodywork professionals, to Susan Linney’s brave “Bottles Down” chronicles, to Tamar Anitai’s “Silly Things People Say When I Tell Them I Don’t Want Kids” and many more. We’ll walk down memory lane with old friends and introduce some new ones. Plus, CAKE. TICKET PROCEEDS WILL SUPPORT VOTE RUN LEAD Buy tickets here!

TueNight 10: Cindy Gallop

To quote her Twitter bio, Cindy Gallop likes to “blow shit up.” Following a decades-long career in advertising, Cindy started building the world’s first social sex video-sharing platform, MakeLoveNotPorn. At her TedTalk in 2009, she explained that the idea for the site came out of dating younger men, which opened her eyes to “the real ramifications of the creeping ubiquity of hardcore pornography in our culture.” But it hasn’t been an easy sell: “It’s been enormously challenging raising funding; my biggest obstacle finding investors is the social dynamic I call, ‘Fear of what other people will think.’ When you have a truly world-changing startup, you have to change the world to fit it, not the other way round.” In addition to life as a boundary-busting entrepreneur and consultant, Cindy is a life-long champion of gender equality, diversity and inclusion in every area of business and life. “I’m 58 and I encourage everyone to #sayyourage — I’m partnering with AARP and their excellent #DisruptAging program to challenge and change depictions of age in advertising and popular culture, by challenging …

TueNight 10: Jeanne Pinder

Jeanne Pinder is the founder of ClearHealthCosts, a journalism startup in New York City bringing transparency to health care by telling people what things cost. “After almost 25 years at The New York Times, I volunteered for a buyout in 2009. I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do, but was lucky enough to land in a class in “entrepreneurial journalism,” at CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, with Jeff Jarvis and Jeremy Caplan, where I grew the idea for this startup.” Almost exactly a year later, she won a shark-tank-type pitch contest in front of a jury of New York City venture capitalists and internet bigwigs to found the company. Jeanne hails from Iowa, where she started her career as a journalist at her family’s paper, The Grinnbell Herald-Register, as a cub reporter at the tender age of 13. This means she has been a journalist for more than 50 years! Here is her TueNight 10:1. On the nightstand:  The Art of Asking, by Amanda Palmer. No One Tells You This, Glynnis MacNicol. Women and Power, Mary Beard. Rereading: Eloquent Rage, …

TueNight Live: Photos from “FLASH”

On September 25, TueNight Live steamed things up with our latest issue —  FLASH. Braving the (appropriately named) flash floods outside, we cozied into the couches of Industrious to talk flashbacks, hot flashes, fevers and desert orgies. All photos by Erika Hokanson. Margit introduced the evening and a flash of skin. Dig her “Trouble Maker” temporary tattoo from Tattly. Alixandria Arungah, community manager for our sponsor Industrious Brooklyn, welcomed us into her comfortable space. Activist Sara Berliner describes her organization Vote Like a Mother, as one that promotes acceptance, equity, justice and love. Tracey made us laugh with a tale of her first hot flash in the five Kübler-Ross stages. Jen reads her story of getting pregnant, going through menopause and learning the ukulele.  We were delighted to witness her first public performance, adapting Peggy Lee’s Fever into a hilarious (and also poignant?) meditation on menopause and aging. TueNight newsletter editor Karen Gerwin introduced her good friend, Sue Kramer. Sue brought us stories from her past bodies — from the Playboy mansion to Paris — and …

TueNight 10: Jamia Wilson

Jamia Wilson is quite fond of the Florynce Kennedy quote, “Don’t agonize! Organize!” — a sentiment which prompted her to co-create the kick-ass guide, Road Map for Revolutionaries: Advocacy for All, just out today (Happy Pub Day!). “In the post-Trump frenzy, I turned to books written by strong women disruptors as a roadmap for what to do, says Jamia who co-authored the book with Elisa Camahort Page and Carolyn Gerin. “I was compelled to collaborate on a direct, snappy guidebook that showcases tools you need to ignite the change you want to see in the world.”Jamia is also the director of Feminist Press, the author of Young, Gifted, and Black, and she wrote the oral history in Together We Rise: Behind the Scenes at the Protest Heard Around the World.  Carolina-born and Saudi Arabia raised, she currently lives in New York City, where she’s an adjunct professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.“I love teaching undergraduate classes about gender studies and revolutions,” she says. “We can learn so much from the past to help inform a better future.” 1. On the nightstand: Training School for Negro …

TueNight 10: Theo Kogan

Theo Kogan is a makeup artist, musician, native Brooklynite, activist and mom. She is well known for being the singer of the Lunachicks, a band of best friends who happened to be girls. Theo and her pals started the band in high school just for fun; they ended up touring the world through the ’90s, becoming one of the Riot Grrrl bands of the era, and opening up for many of the legendary pop-punk bands of the day. She was a NY nightlife muse, and one of the first heavily tattooed fashion models/actors. We were thrilled when Theo made her live reading debut at TueNight Live: 90s Bitchin July. She has two essays in the forthcoming book Women Who Rock, which is being released next month. You can pre-order a copy now, so do it! She is currently painting faces in New York Fashion Week. Literally. Right now. 1. On the nightstand: There’s a stack of books (seriously) but what I am reading is The Power by Naomi Alderman… for the past 6 months. Clearly I don’t get much time to read. Also tissues, my Hurraw! …

TueNight 10: Crystal Durant

She’s an artist, an educator, a model, a DJ, a singer, a writer and for many a muse — Crystal is undoubtedly a modern renaissance woman.  These days she writes for The Z Review, sings in a monthly tribute show with F*BOMB at Arlene’s Grocery, and has her own Prince Purple Rain tribute band. In her own words, she’s a “magnet for all kinds of crazy, always smells like fresh flowers, and is waiting for the right guy to show up, man up, and make a semi-honest woman outta me”. Crystal had us all in stitches with her love of Seinfeld quotes at last month’s TueNight Live: 90s Bitch. Here’s her TueNight 10: 1. On the nightstand: A bottle of water, the TV remote, my signature necklaces, and my limited edition, highly sought after, collectible, Flava Flav alarm clock, SIGNED BY FLAV HIMSELF. It wakes me up by yelling, “YEAAAAAAAAHHHH BOYYYYEEEE!” No joke.  2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Cutting the neck out and the sleeves off of my t-shirts because they’re too constricting.  I think this is why people always ask if I’m a Rock Star, because …

TueNight 10: Glynnis MacNicol

In her just published memoir, No One Tells You This, Glynnis MacNicol chronicles her 40th year as a single woman without children, and what it means to live without a blueprint. “The narratives we have around women’s live are very narrow — nearly every story ends with a marriage or a baby. I wanted to tell a story that ended with neither, and yet was (hopefully) still compelling and reflected some truths about my own life and the lives so many women I know are living. And living well!” Amen! Glynnis is the co-founder of a women’s networking group called TheLi.st, and has written for The New York Times, The Guardian, The Cut, and many others. Here is her TueNight 10: 1. On the nightstand: My Year of Rest and Relaxation by Ottessa Moshfegh. I’ve only read the first few pages but already find myself eager to get back to it. I love the premise of a woman alone in a room; it feels like a strange, appealing subversion of A Room of One’s Own;  Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke …

TueNight 10: Allison Yarrow

Over the last few years author Allison Yarrow has been reinvestigating the stories that were told (and sold) about women in the 90s, culminating in her new book 90s Bitch: Media, Culture, and the Failed Promise of Gender Equality. (She shared some of her wisdom last week at TueNight Live!) On tour for her book, Allison says, “I love meeting people and discussing how narratives about women shaped a generation and the current moment. Writing a book about history has encouraged me to reflect on my own history and how what I watched, read, and heard shaped my own upbringing and the person I am today.” An award-winning journalist, Allison has written for the New York Times, the Washington Post, Vox, and many others. She was a TED resident and produced the (amazing) VICE documentary Misconception. Raised in Macon, Georgia, Allison now lives in Brooklyn, New York. 1. On my nightstand: Like A Mother by Angela Garbes, Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler, No One Tells You This by Glynnis MacNicol, Brave Not Perfect by Reshma Saujani, and How Not to Get Shot: And Other …

TueNight Live: Photos from “90’s Bitch” at The Invisible Dog

Last week, on July 17, TueNight Live rolled back a few decades to celebrate our latest issue —  90’s BITCH. Over 80 people gathered in the beautiful Brooklyn art space The Invisible Dog Art Center to listen to stories from Lunachick Theo Kogan, DJ and modern muse Crystal Durant, artist and author Jenny Laden and TueNight founder Margit Detweiler and a discussion with author Allison Yarrow and her newly released book 90s Bitch: Media, Culture and the Failed Promise of Gender Equality.  On the walls of the space we featured beautiful art by Anne Mourier, Erika Hokanson, Maya Sariahmed, Vanessa Belli, Jenny Laden and Vadis Turner. We sang along to our 90s Spotify playlist. It was a blast (from the past) to nosh, drink and gab with so many friends and fans of TueNight. All photos by the talented Erika Hokanson. A beautiful — albeit muggy — July night at The Invisible Dog. Friends gathered, including artists from the building like Claudia Paneca and featured artist Anne Mourier.       We also picked up a little fresh produce from …

TueNight 10: Amy Sohn

Amy Sohn kicked off her writing career in the mid 90s with an autobiographical column in the New York Press called “Female Trouble,” where she chronicled frustrating dates with comedians, drummers, actors, and playwrights, some of whom wrote in to the newspaper to rebut her accounts, even using the monikers she gave them in the column. She got a lot of hate mail. She closed out the decade in 1999 with her first novel, Run, Catch, Kiss, which launched with a reading at the B&N on Astor Place and party at Joe’s Pub, which had recently opened. Those were the days! She still had her finger on the pulse a decade later, with her controversial novel, Prospect Park West, which skewered the Brooklyn neighborhood for all of its precious eccentricities. She even got the Park Slope Food Coop (where she is still a member) to sell copies of the book. “I’m currently working on a narrative nonfiction project for FSG about feminists in the 19th century, a group of women who lived when you couldn’t send information about contraception through …

TueNight 10: Sara Berliner

In no way a career minimalist, Sara Berliner has been a puppeteer, documentary filmmaker, ethnographer, festival producer, children’s book writer, content curator, digital strategist, and always an activist. This spring she launched Vote Like a Motherto make parenthood and empathy a lens for political engagement. With t-shirts and totes inspired by a sign she made for the March for Our Lives, Vote Like a Mother funnels time/money/voices to essential nonprofits doing the hard daily work on social justice crises of all kinds. “When I graduated college with a degree in Folklore & Mythology (yup, that’s a thing) I knew I wanted to tell stories and help other people tell theirs. Making and expressing meaning was important to me. I figured ‘my thing’ would emerge, but it turns out I’m not directed like a person who always knew they’d be a doctor. This year, I felt called to ramp up my social activism. Vote Like a Mother was the lightning striking.” Here’s her TueNight 10: 1. On the nightstand: Muji eye mask. Sunday Morning lip balm from Love + Sage. …

TueNight 10: Kathryn Finney

Kathryn Finney is a major game-changer in the world of entrepreneurship and tech for Black and LatinX women, as the founder of digitalundivided. In 2016, they released an internal research study called ProjectDiane that literally changed the startup world overnight. The latest update of the report is getting a ton of press for its revelations that more black women than ever are starting businesses, and yet the funding for them lags behind. “We all want to live a creative life that we control. We want to know that our time on this earth mattered, even if it’s to just one person. It’s an honor to know that the work you’ve done has changed people’s lives for the better, but there’s also a great deal of responsibility that comes with this honor. I spend 99% of my day trying to balance this responsibility while also working hard at being a great mom, a boss, a wife, a thought leader, a daughter, and a friend.” Here is Kathryn’s TueNight 10:1. On the nightstand: How to Slay by Constance White, 100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez …

TueNight 10: Ashley Milne-Tyte

Ashley Milne-Tyte is a radio journalist and podcaster. She was born and raised in London and moved to New York 21 years ago. She’s been hosting her podcast The Broad Experience, about women and the workplace, since 2012. Back then there was a real lack of helpful information and storytelling about women’s lives at work. She also reports for “Marketplace,” the public radio business show, hosts a podcast for Morgan Stanley, and teaches part-time at Columbia Journalism School. “Maybe I’m doing things the other way round from a lot of people. I was single for a long time and was good at it, but I always hoped I’d meet someone to share my life with. The NYC dating scene is pretty brutal but online dating finally came through for me (I truly was an early adopter, like 1999, when no one had photos in their profiles). I got married a year and a half ago at 45 to a wonderful man and am really enjoying it. I’ve always been a late bloomer. You learn a lot …

TueNight 10: Ginger McKnight-Chavers

Ginger McKnight-Chavers is a writer and attorney whose first novel, In the Heart of Texas, won the 2016 USA Best Book Award for African-American fiction. Though she has lived in New York for decades, Ginger is a native of Dallas, with deep, multigenerational Texas roots. As a result, she can’t stop talking or writing about Texas as a metaphor for everything good, bad and in between. “I want to tell stories from the perspective of different types of Texans than the characters you see in the media. Smart, nuanced stories about the amazing African-American women that surrounded and influenced me.” Ginger’s transition from a demanding corporate/arts/entertainment legal practice to full-time writing was long and often frustrating. “It’s hard for a seasoned professional to be treated like an idiot,” she says. “Luckily, I believed in my work and had others who believed in me as well, and I’m now able to do what I love full-time.” She is currently working on her second novel, Oak Cliff as well as a book about her mother’s life and activism to accompany …

TueNight 10: Victoria Selbach

In 2008, after spending 20 years in corporate fashion design, Victoria decided to paint full-time — now she can’t be stopped. One of her most compelling series of works: “Godesses“, gorgeous, larger-than-life-size nudes. “I strive to make a deep empathic connection to the contemporary women I paint, capturing their immense goddess power.”  You can find Victoria’s work in private collections and exhibits across the country and she curated the PoetsArtists exhibition The Artists Gaze; Seeing Women in the 21st Century where she brought together the perspectives of over 40 artists.  Right now, Victoria is researching her next big series: listening to the stories of women and collecting related material and images. “The new paintings will be driven by the truths individual women have grown to know about their own sexuality. These are the stories they rarely share, the complex realities they know to be true about themselves but rarely wear on their sleeve.” 1. On my nightstand: Next to fancy eye shades and YogaToes, I accumulate bits and pieces of items I’ve recently read. Near the top of the heap, torn from the New York Times, …

TueNight Live: Photos from “First Jobs” at The Wing

All photos by Erika Hokanson. We worked Fashion Week, drove a Weinermobile, toured with RuPaul, sold chocolate chip cookies — and got more than we bargained for. These were just a few of the “first jobs” our storytellers shared during our April 24 event, TueNight Live. The evening was a benefit for Higher Heights, a phenomenal organization that works to get more Black women into political life — as candidates and participants. Thanks to generous donations from ticket buyers, those who donated at the event and a matching gift from philanthropist Ruth Ann Harnisch, we raised over $6000! Thank you for that. Now, some snaps: We cozied up in the drop-dead gorgeous Wing Dumbo location. Chatting up new and old friends.       Margit took the mic, introducing the night. Kimberly Allen-Peeler, co-founder of Higher Heights, talked about the HH mission and about her job as a 15-year-old Girl Scout spending a week in a congressional office… during Tailhook. Watch her story here. Mallory Kasdan reads her first job essay about touring the country with RuPaul …

TueNight 10: Whitney Johnson

Whitney Johnson is a business coach, bestselling author, and twice honored as one of the world’s top 50 most influential management thinkers. She’s also a co-founder of Forty Women Over 40 to Watch. (We love that, natch). Right now she’s busily prepping to launch a new book, Build An A-Team: Play to Their Strengths and Lead Them Up the Learning Curve. It’s amazing she has any downtime — but she makes a point to find it, whether hiking up Camelback mountain during a recent conference in Phoenix, or spending time with her family before hitting Florida, Boston, and Las Vegas for more speaking engagements. “Things are a whirlwind right now, but that’s what happens when you launch a book,” she tells TueNight. “It’s quite thrilling!” During our last event, she shared a touching story about her own insights after her brother’s passing which you can read below. But first, here’s Whitney‘s TueNight 10: 1. On the nightstand: The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson and a bottle of water. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Mexican food, especially Red Iguana in Salt Lake City. 3. Jam of the minute: Headspace app. 4. Thing I …

TueNight 10: Abby West

Abby West has always loved telling stories, typically chronicling other people’s stories as a beat newspaper reporter, or later as a magazine and digital editor at People, Entertainment Weekly, Essence, and Yahoo or currently in her role as an editor for Audible. However, Abby has started to embrace telling her own story and finding she has a lot to say — we were thrilled to have her as a reader at TueNight Live: RISE. In 2014, After Abby donated her bone marrow in 2014, she joined the board of directors for Be The Match (a.k.a the National Marrow Donor Program). Abby recently moved to New Jersey with her kids, something she says her New Yorker brain can’t quite process. 1. On the nightstand: An early copy of Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi (It has the most beautiful cover and is a phenomenal story), a vanilla-scented candle, and usually a cup of something that should have gone back out to the kitchen yesterday. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Watching General Hospital. I’ve been watching this soap (on and off) since my babysitter had it on …

Yng Ru-Chen at TueNight Live Rise

TueNight 10: Yng-Ru Chen

Yng recently left her job as Director of Marketing and Partnerships at Tattly to pursue independent work as a communications consultant and art advisor. “My background is in the arts, and now that I don’t have a 9-5 in an office, I’ve been able to find time to see more exhibitions and visit artist studios, including spending our kids’ February break in Nola to check out Prospect New Orleans, the city’s triennial.” She is currently working with the artist James Clar, whose solo exhibition will open at Jane Lombard Gallery in May. 1. On the nightstand: My girl Anya Yurchyshyn’s review copy of My Dead Parents, and I just finished Celeste Ng’s Little Fires Everywhere. And a million copies of The New Yorker. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Listening to Cardi B. 3. Jam of the minute: Bodak Yellow. 4. Thing I miss: Solid abs. 5. 80’s crush: Eddie Furlong, Terminator days. My ultimate girl crush was Paula Abdul from her Forever Your Girl era. 6. Current crush: My husbands (see photo). 7. Will whine about: New York City real estate. 8. Will wine about: Any of the Italian reds served …

TueNight Live: Photos from “RISE”

Last week, on March 6, we returned to the cozy Wren Downstairs (last time we were there was for “Sisters”), to bring our RISE issue to life. We had six phenomenal storytellers — Melanie Dione, Kerika Nalty Fields, Whitney Johnson, Elana Rabinowitz, Abby West and Yng-Ru Chen. We drank delicious Rise-themed cocktails, noshed on empanadas, and — of course — shared our stories. All photos by Kacy Jahanbini. Margit kicked off the evening talking about the meaning of this issue (more on that here), thanking The Wren for hosting, our writers for reading, and our bartender, Dale, for bartending. Kerika pulled us in with her hushed and intimate story of rising in the wee hours of the morning to write. TueNighter Adrianna introduced her friend of more than a decade, Yng. (Has it really been that long?) Yng’s shared a harrowing story of a rising fever during the birth of her first child. And Melanie straight up brought the house down with her frank description of her quest to have an orgasm. After catching our collective …

My TueNight 10: Stacy Pratt

Stacy Pratt always meant to be a writer but ended up teaching freshman composition and Native American literature for almost 18 years instead. Then last year, just before her father died the day before her 42nd birthday, he told her to stop teaching and write. She always obeys him, so that’s what she did. Now she is the web editor and a contributing writer for First American Art Magazine, a magazine about Indigenous arts, written primarily by Indigenous writers. She is also a contributing writer at Hello Giggles, and has written for several other places, including Indian Country Media Network. 1. On the nightstand: Ready Player One by Ernest Cline for an essay I’m writing, art magazines, and Before I Grow Too Old by Pat Jilks on Kindle. It’s a self-published book about a woman who walked all the way across England, and when I finish reading it, I just start over. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Defending Taylor Swift on Facebook. I can scroll past all kinds of serious injustice, but when someone unfairly criticizes her, I spend …

My TueNight 10: Elana Rabinovitz

Elana Rabinowitz is a self-described late bloomer. She was 24 when she learned to ride a bike; 45 when she published her first article. “After a failed attempt at fertility in my early 40’s,” says Elana, “I needed to ‘give birth’ to something, to change my life somehow, and writing did that.” She located a former professor, Susan Shapiro, and took her “Instant Gratification Takes Too Long” writing seminar. “She focused on humiliation essays, and when I read mine to the class, I was overcome with positive feedback — that became my first published piece. From there, I just kept going.” Elana has since had essays published in The New York Times and The Washington Post, and one story was just chosen to be in Chicken Soup for The Soul: The Power of Yes. By day, Elana teaches ESL at a middle school in Fort Greene, Brooklyn. 1. On the nightstand: Zadie Smith’s Feel Free, an assortment of Malcolm Gladwell Books and my travel alarm clock. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Searching for the perfect felt …

Now That I’m Over 40, I Cannot and I Will Not… (VIDEO)

“Stop cursing like a sailor!” “Stop having adventures.” “Wear Spanx.” Hell to the yes, sister. We asked several women over 40 about the things they can’t stop/ won’t stop doing, now that they (we) are grown-ass women. We filmed this at our last TueNight Live event in Manhattan, sponsored by AARP (High five AARP! We love our sponsors!) and we’re so happy to have them sponsor this video. It’s all part of their mission to reinvent what it means to age — aka #DisruptAging. So now that YOU are over 40, what’s the thing you won’t stop doing? Watch this video and then tell us in the comments below. We’ll be rounding them up to share, compare and celebrate. No effs left to give. We’re #NobodysMaam

What’s the Most Ageist Thing Anyone Has Ever Said to You? (VIDEO)

“You’re old!” “When are you going to dye your hair?” “You look great for your age!” We asked several women over 40 to share the rudest, funniest, and just plain strange comments they’ve heard about being the age they are. Which um, isn’t old, by the way. We filmed this at our last TueNight Live event in Manhattan, sponsored by AARP (High five AARP! We love our sponsors!) and we’re so happy to have them sponsor this video. It’s all part of their mission to reinvent what it means to age — aka #DisruptAging. What’s the most ageist thing anyone’s ever said to you? Watch this video and then tell us YOUR most ageist story in the comments below. We’ll be rounding them up to share for collective commiseration.  We’re #NobodysMaam.  

TueNight Live: Photos from “TRUST”

Walking into the red room at Spring Place, one of our storytellers, Jenny Douglas squealed, “This place is like a ’70s sunken living room!” Later, she corrected herself and whispered, “No, it’s more as if Hugh Hefner had a vagina. I love it.” Last week, on October 17, we brought TueNight Live and our TRUST issue,  to the seriously swanky Spring Place, where we shared wine, sandwiches, and — of course — stories, in a sort of loungey theater in the square, with a beautiful view of Tribeca. Margit kicked off the evening, thanking both Spring Place for hosting and our evening’s sponsor, AARP. Reading her story via her phone — because 2017 — Dori Fern described how choosing calm over chaos improved her relationship with her kids. (While she read her story off her phone, her daughter actually texted her, “do you have the laundry card on you?”) After fixing our microphone (it was backward — sigh) Crystal Durant told a harrowing story of learning her father was untrustworthy. Oft CNN contributor Sally Kohn posed …

Get Tickets to Our Next Event in Manhattan!

  CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS! Join the TueNight crew for an evening of storytelling around the theme TRUST. We’ll be in the swanky Spring Place red room, where we’ll drink cocktails, enjoy hors d’oeuvres and put our trust in — who else? Each other. Our Storytellers: Jenny Douglas (@BrooklynCottage), founder of The Brooklyn Cottage, television producer, and helper of women going through divorce Issa Mas (@IssaMas), New York single mom balancing writing, raising a 10-yr-old and staying sane. BlogHer Voice of the Year, 2012 Sally Kohn (@sallykohn), founder and CEO of the Movement Vision Lab and CNN commentator Crystal Durant (@DJCrystalClear6), Black Renaissance woman, vocalist and performance artist who writes for the Z Review and Forces of Geek Lu Chekowsky, SVP of Brand Creative at Comedy Central. She once ate a turkey sandwich with Britney Spears Dori Fern (@dorifern), Content marketing strategist and award-winning latke expert CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS!

TueNight Live: Glowing on a Brooklyn Rooftop [PHOTOS]

Could there be a more beautiful night? On June 27 we took our latest event, GLOW, to the rooftop of the co-working space and sponsor Industrious Brooklyn. The sky was, indeed, glowing. All photos are by the wonderful Kalya O’Donoghue. Hosts Karen and Margit mingle with friend (and TueNight contributor) Lauren Young. Over 80 people joined us! Our biggest crowd yet.  Margit introduced our esteemed batch of beautiful storytellers. Carolyn Edgar kicked things off with her poignant (and very relatable) essay bemoaning the difficulty of pleasing both her kids and herself at the same time. Amy Silverstein ducked in between TV interviews to read from her moving, beautiful new book The Glory Was I Had Such Friends. We were rapt… Then Alice brought down the house, as she does, with her narration of a very non-romantic night of edible ingestion. We took a pause to eat some of the delicious food provided by Brooklyn locals R & D foods and Alta Calidad. We gave ourselves a little “glow” from BeautyCounter. And of course we drank rosé. Duh. Copies of Amy, Alice and Stephanie’s books were available …