Author: TueNight Crew

TueNight 10: Penny Wrenn

Age: 41 ½ and some change Basic Bio: I’m a semi-retired magazine staffer and freelancer, the daughter of Evelyn and Curtis Wrenn, Sr., a late bloomer (and occasional wilter), and a moderate income earner. Beyond the bio: “At 41, I often feel guilty about feeling more gypped than grateful about my life. I regularly make SMH-level mistakes that seem immature AF.  When I do, my inner you-should-know-better-than-that voice of wisdom is always like, “WTF, Penny?” And yet, I keep on keeping on. Because at 41, my “GTFOH, Penny!” self-talk game is tight, my comebacks and bounce-backs have stickier than ever landings (though I seldom plant my feet where I expected). What can I say? Middle age has endowed me with the ability to more easily get over myself.” 1. On the nightstand: Bullshit or Fertilizer, written by my friend and one-half of myall-time favorite married couple. This is the simplest, most essential “do the damn thing already” self-help advice ever written for us Generation Xers who are late-70s born and 90s-era hip-hop bred. The book is small and succinct enough to read in a …

TueNight 10: Dionne Ford

Age: 49 Quick bio: Co-editor of the anthology Slavery’s Descendants: Shared Legacies of Race and Reconciliation (Rutgers University Press, May 2019) and author of the memoir Finding Josephine, forthcoming from Putnam. Her writing has won awards from the National Association of Black Journalists, the Newswomen’s Club of New York, the Sustainable Arts Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. She’s also a regular TueNight contributor.  Beyond the bio: “I wanted to write my own invented stories since my parents gave me a drugstore journal with a lock and key when I was seven, but it seemed impractical and indulgent to study storytelling. My parents worked hard to move up the economic ladder to middle class-dom, so I studied slightly more practical journalism instead. It wasn’t until my late 30s that I started to find my personal writing voice. Time can kill a lot of things but not a deep desire. When my daughters started middle and high school in 2014, I went back to school too for my MFA in Creative Writing. I was 47 when I graduated in 2016. …

TueNight 10: Susan Linney

Age: 43Basic Bio: Former book and magazine editor turned freelance writer and online content producer.Beyond the bio: “Writing about my alcoholism for Bottles Down for TueNight was profoundly rewarding, but also much more personally taxing than I had ever anticipated. Recovery isn’t static; you don’t achieve it, stick a flag in the ground and then declare it as your own. It’s a living, breathing, moving muscle, something that changes and grows in ways you can’t anticipate. And suddenly, all I wanted to do was go back to being a stealth, behind-the-scenes writer and editor. At the same time, I realized that by being open about what was once so shameful to me, and literally incorporating it into my livelihood, I gave myself a wonderful new feeling of purpose. So these days, while I still juggle multiple writing/editing projects, my favorite gig by far is the work I do for Rehabs.com, which is a really helpful website that provides in-depth, unbiased info on addiction treatment centers across the country. It’s the best way I know how to help shake the …

TueNight 10: Kristen Chase

Age: 42 Basic bio: She’s been a music therapist, college professor, online web publisher (at Cool Mom Picks) and social media magic maker (at the newly-launched, killer-named One Tough Bitch). Beyond the bio: “I still remember when my post-college internship supervisor asked me what I thought “old” was and I said “40.” What followed as a stink eye that I’ll never forget. Now that I’m 42, I probably wouldn’t have been as nice to me as she was.  My mid life status has brought a whole lot more worry: about every ache and pain. About trying to raise four humans to be awesome, empathic, compassionate people. About leaving a legacy for them. But it’s also brought a whole lot of DGAF, which I so desperately wish had been bestowed on me sooner.  At a pretty inspiring weekend at Campowerment (seriously life changing), someone told me that nothing you do has to be forever. That the choices you make for today, don’t necessarily need to be what you do tomorrow, or the next week, month or …

TueNight 10: Michele Carlo

Michele Carlo became a performer at 35.  “I was at a crossroads in my life and figured, eff it, let me go for it. I didn’t want to face my last moments knowing I’d wussed out from trying the one thing I knew I wanted to do. And now it’s over 20 years later and I’m still at it.” The native New Yorker, Nuyorican and “natural redhead,” has done everything from performance art to improv/comedy to emcee burlesque shows. She discovered storytelling at a MothSlam in 2003, and has performed at many of their Mainstage shows in NYC. Her first book,  Fish Out Of Agua: My Life on Neither Side of the (Subway) Tracks, is a NYC set memoir based on her early Moth stories. It was a real treat to have her perform at our recent TueNight Birthday Bash! In Michele’s “free” time she curates/produces/co-hosts two storytelling shows: “No Name Super Storytellers” at the Word Up bookstore in Washington Heights and “New York Story Exchange” at the Cornelia Street Café. She also hosts a radio show/podcast …

TueNight 10: Tamar Anitai

Tamar Anitai making everyone laugh at the Birthday Bash (Photo: Simon Courchel) If you haven’t experienced a Tamar Anitai story, this might be the time to read one (if you’re like us, you could use a good laugh right about now.)  She wins the award, too, for the most far-reaching topics: Kale, No Kids, Sleep Gurus, Slang, Germs and Creepy Babies. She also stirred up some controversy in TueNighters with her epic tampon tossing thread. Tamar turned 40 recently and, after a long career as a digital editor and writer, she’s now director of audience engagement for a multinational healthcare consumer company. But that’s certainly not all she is. “I’m trying to learn to not define myself by my work/day job,” says Tamar, “Is that a thing women do? I do, and I’m curious about how that changes — or doesn’t change — as we get older. I’m working on it as I try to be a more mindful, meditating type of person.” As to her home life, Tamar has a lovely husband and two cats “one of whom has really unfortunate teeth that are literally rotting and …

TueNight Live: Photos from our Birthday Party!

We turned five, y’all! With nearly 100 of our BFFs in attendance, we celebrated our first TueNight half-decade remembering our favorite pieces from the past and listening to brand new ones. We also noshed on some delicious “pencil” cake, raised $1500 for VoteRunLead and connected with TueNighters old and new. All photos by Simon Courchel. The Invisible Dog Art Center filled up quickly as we got the evening started. Margit reminded us of the TueNight origin story and the piece she published on Medium that started it all: Dinosaur Jr. — On Entering the Puberty of Old Age. She thanked our sponsors Ruth Ann Harnisch, MedAmour, Hint Water and Brandless. And then kicked off our first storyteller, Tamar Anitai. Tamar read her 2013 story that has resonated with so many of you — and a bit controversial at the time she wrote it —  being a grown, married woman who planned to live a child-free life. A lot of nodding heads in our midst. Watch Tamar read here! Susan Linney, one of our founding editors, contributing …

TueNight 10: Lizz Winstead

Lizz Winstead is a feminist cultural icon for our times — and a hilarious one at that (if you follow her on Twitter or are a fan of the Daily Show which she co-created.). For the past three months, she’s toured the country doing stand-up in support of abortion providers, joined protest movement after protest movement and “raged at the machine known as my TV,” she tells us. Last week she hosted “The Golden Probes,” (you can watch Oct 28 on GoldenProbes.com) alongside Margaret Cho, a raucous evening of comedy, music, and celebration, to raise awareness about what is at stake for reproductive rights in the midterm elections. Produced by Lady Parts Justice, the organization Lizz founded in 2012, The Probes is billed as “Sexism’s Most Glamorous Night. “I’m thrilled to have Margaret Cho come on board this year as our host along Stormy Daniels,” says Lizz. “Yes, Stormy will be presenting at our show!” The show also includes Sandra Bernhard, Taylor Schilling, Dan Savage, and Patricia Okoumou, the woman who scaled the Statue of Liberty of July …

Happy Birthday to Us! Get Tix to Our Live Event, 10/23

We can hardly believe it’s been five years. But as any TueNighter knows… Age is something to CELEBRATE. For our birthday edition, we’re bringing back excerpts of some of our TueNight faves — from Dodai Stewart bonding with bodywork professionals, to Susan Linney’s brave “Bottles Down” chronicles, to Tamar Anitai’s “Silly Things People Say When I Tell Them I Don’t Want Kids.” We’ll also have Deb Copaken and Michele Carlo with new stories and Cindy Gallop on why we need to shout our age from the rooftops. Hell yeah.  (Top row (l-r): Deb Copaken, Susan Linney, Dionne Ford. Middle Row: Heather Barmore, Dodai Stewart, Tamar Anitai. Bottom row: Karen Gerwin, Michele Carlo, Penny Wrenn) We’ll walk down memory lane with old friends and introduce some new ones. Plus, CAKE. TICKET PROCEEDS WILL SUPPORT VOTE RUN LEAD Buy tickets here!

TueNight 10: Cindy Gallop

To quote her Twitter bio, Cindy Gallop likes to “blow shit up.” Following a decades-long career in advertising, Cindy started building the world’s first social sex video-sharing platform, MakeLoveNotPorn. At her TedTalk in 2009, she explained that the idea for the site came out of dating younger men, which opened her eyes to “the real ramifications of the creeping ubiquity of hardcore pornography in our culture.” But it hasn’t been an easy sell: “It’s been enormously challenging raising funding; my biggest obstacle finding investors is the social dynamic I call, ‘Fear of what other people will think.’ When you have a truly world-changing startup, you have to change the world to fit it, not the other way round.” In addition to life as a boundary-busting entrepreneur and consultant, Cindy is a life-long champion of gender equality, diversity and inclusion in every area of business and life. “I’m 58 and I encourage everyone to #sayyourage — I’m partnering with AARP and their excellent #DisruptAging program to challenge and change depictions of age in advertising and popular culture, by challenging …

TueNight 10: Jeanne Pinder

Jeanne Pinder is the founder of ClearHealthCosts, a journalism startup in New York City bringing transparency to health care by telling people what things cost. “After almost 25 years at The New York Times, I volunteered for a buyout in 2009. I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do, but was lucky enough to land in a class in “entrepreneurial journalism,” at CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, with Jeff Jarvis and Jeremy Caplan, where I grew the idea for this startup.” Almost exactly a year later, she won a shark-tank-type pitch contest in front of a jury of New York City venture capitalists and internet bigwigs to found the company. Jeanne hails from Iowa, where she started her career as a journalist at her family’s paper, The Grinnbell Herald-Register, as a cub reporter at the tender age of 13. This means she has been a journalist for more than 50 years! Here is her TueNight 10:1. On the nightstand:  The Art of Asking, by Amanda Palmer. No One Tells You This, Glynnis MacNicol. Women and Power, Mary Beard. Rereading: Eloquent Rage, …

TueNight 10: Soraya Chemaly

Soraya at the Women’s Right to Rally. (Photo courtesy of Soraya Chemaly)  Why are we so filled with rage, like, all the damn time? We can think of a few reasons… Soraya Chemaly‘s new collection of essays, Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger hits at the root causes of that anger, how it affects us in every aspect of our lives, and how we might, in fact, celebrate it.  Rage is something we’ve been trained to hide, suggests Soraya. In Rage she writes,”This desire not to be disliked or seen as crazy, irrational, or dangerous, masks the lack of control that we already live with as the result of the silencing, sublimating, denying, and social opprobrium.”Time to let your rage flag fly. An award-winning writer, activist, and director of the Women’s Media Center Speech Project, Soraya has been traveling all over the country to promote Rage. “Being on book tour is so very different from writing a book,” she says, “It’s been fun, but hard to adjust from being basically solitary to being intensely social…One of the most interesting parts has been how difficult …

TueNight Live: Photos from “FLASH”

On September 25, TueNight Live steamed things up with our latest issue —  FLASH. Braving the (appropriately named) flash floods outside, we cozied into the couches of Industrious to talk flashbacks, hot flashes, fevers and desert orgies. All photos by Erika Hokanson. Margit introduced the evening and a flash of skin. Dig her “Trouble Maker” temporary tattoo from Tattly. Alixandria Arungah, community manager for our sponsor Industrious Brooklyn, welcomed us into her comfortable space. Activist Sara Berliner describes her organization Vote Like a Mother, as one that promotes acceptance, equity, justice and love. Tracey made us laugh with a tale of her first hot flash in the five Kübler-Ross stages. Jen reads her story of getting pregnant, going through menopause and learning the ukulele.  We were delighted to witness her first public performance, adapting Peggy Lee’s Fever into a hilarious (and also poignant?) meditation on menopause and aging. TueNight newsletter editor Karen Gerwin introduced her good friend, Sue Kramer. Sue brought us stories from her past bodies — from the Playboy mansion to Paris — and …

TueNight 10: Issa Mas

Issa Mas is a freelance writer whose work has been featured on local news sites PIX11 and CBS Local, in the humor anthology See Mom Run: Side-Splitting Essays from the World’s Most Harried Moms, and on the now-defunct award-winning blog Single Mama NYC, which was recognized as a Voice of the Year by BlogHer in 2012. You can usually find Issa talking about race (loudly), mental health (passionately), and single parenting (exhaustedly) at @IssaMas. We are thrilled that she will be one of our readers at TueNIght Live: TRUST on 10/17!  1. On the nightstand: How To Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk by Adele Faber & Elaine Mazlish, because solo parenting a 10-year-old boy requires reinforcements. Stephen King’s short story collection, Bazaar of Bad Dreams, is underneath it for when I want a quick, satisfying read by one of my favorite authors. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Speaking out against injustice; in any of its forms. 3. Jam of the minute: The Budos Band III album by The Budos Band. 5. 80’s crush: Prince. 6. Current crush: My husband (in my head), Idris Elba. 7. Will whine about: My …

TueNight 10: Carolyn Gerin

Carolyn Gerin (on the right) with friends in her happy place(Photo courtesy of Carolyn Gerin) Carolyn Gerin is a career creative, activist, and optimist with a punk rock soul. “I love to flip the script on institutions and time-honored belief systems,” she says. First she tackled the Wedding Industrial Complex, as author of the bestselling Anti-Bride series. And now she’s tackling the burgeoning cannabis industry. She co-founded Cannawise.co, a creative agency dedicated to the B2B + B2C cannabis industry as well as awareness and advocacy.  Most recently though she’s embarking on a book tour as the co-author (along with last week’s TueNight 10 Jamia Wilson and Elisa Camahort Page) of Road Map for Revolutionaries: Resistance, Activism and Advocacy For All. (Ten Speed Press). Busy activist that Carolyn! Her evening ritual? “I turn off the computer and phone, light a candle, put on some good music, cook, and switch out from the relentless work grind — this transition is akin to Mr. Rogers putting on his cardigan when he crosses the threshold to his home. I don’t check my phone every 5 minutes because it …

TueNight 10: Jamia Wilson

Jamia Wilson is quite fond of the Florynce Kennedy quote, “Don’t agonize! Organize!” — a sentiment which prompted her to co-create the kick-ass guide, Road Map for Revolutionaries: Advocacy for All, just out today (Happy Pub Day!). “In the post-Trump frenzy, I turned to books written by strong women disruptors as a roadmap for what to do, says Jamia who co-authored the book with Elisa Camahort Page and Carolyn Gerin. “I was compelled to collaborate on a direct, snappy guidebook that showcases tools you need to ignite the change you want to see in the world.”Jamia is also the director of Feminist Press, the author of Young, Gifted, and Black, and she wrote the oral history in Together We Rise: Behind the Scenes at the Protest Heard Around the World.  Carolina-born and Saudi Arabia raised, she currently lives in New York City, where she’s an adjunct professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.“I love teaching undergraduate classes about gender studies and revolutions,” she says. “We can learn so much from the past to help inform a better future.” 1. On the nightstand: Training School for Negro …

TueNight 10: Theo Kogan

Theo Kogan is a makeup artist, musician, native Brooklynite, activist and mom. She is well known for being the singer of the Lunachicks, a band of best friends who happened to be girls. Theo and her pals started the band in high school just for fun; they ended up touring the world through the ’90s, becoming one of the Riot Grrrl bands of the era, and opening up for many of the legendary pop-punk bands of the day. She was a NY nightlife muse, and one of the first heavily tattooed fashion models/actors. We were thrilled when Theo made her live reading debut at TueNight Live: 90s Bitchin July. She has two essays in the forthcoming book Women Who Rock, which is being released next month. You can pre-order a copy now, so do it! She is currently painting faces in New York Fashion Week. Literally. Right now. 1. On the nightstand: There’s a stack of books (seriously) but what I am reading is The Power by Naomi Alderman… for the past 6 months. Clearly I don’t get much time to read. Also tissues, my Hurraw! …

TueNight 10: Adaora Udoji

“I am utterly obsessed with all things emerging tech; that means a lot of artificial intelligence, blockchain, virtual reality, and augmented reality, among others.” Adaora Udoji proves that it’s never too late for career reinvention. She started in the law, transitioned to broadcast news, corporate strategy to digital startups, to venture capital and “well, now I’m looking forward to working from a bigger platform in the near future, stay tuned.”   She is loving her recent appointment as an Entrepreneur-in-Residence at WeWorks Lab in NYC.  “I consider myself truly fortunate to be working and consulting with extraordinary entrepreneurs, technologists, investors, and corporations who are at the cutting edge or trying to be.” What is her greatest lesson so far? “I can’t be different from who I am and that’s all good. I’m perfectly imperfect just like the next person. I do myself a favor every time I remember that and allow myself to follow my gut even if it’s taking me down an unconventional path. I gain something truly with each experience, whether I enjoyed it or not.” …

TueNight 10: Jo Piazza

Jo Piazza with her son at a UFO viewing center in Southern Colorado(photo courtesy of Jo Piazza) “I’m finally at a point in my life where I can say my job is to make cool shit,” says Jo Piazza, TueNight contributor, author of seven books and former editor at Yahoo, Current TV and New York Daily News. Jo’s latest novel is Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win (Simon and Schuster), about a woman running for Senate in the most important race in the country during a midterm election. “I feel like writing Charlotte, this fearless and ambitious woman, has given me more confidence. I’m finally advocating for myself in a way I was afraid to in my 20s and early 30s. It’s funny because when I was younger I really had nothing to lose. I had no family, no mortgage, no health concerns. Now I have all of those things, but for some reason I feel less afraid.” Jo has been driving from coast to coast, promoting her new book.”My goal is to start a big ass conversation about women, ambition, power and leadership.” Amidst it all, Jo …

TueNight 10: Tamara Winfrey Harris

Tamara Winfrey Harris is a stealth radical. She writes about race, gender and their intersection with politics, pop culture and current events. She graciously joined us in The Hotbed last month for a lively discussion of her book, The Sisters Are Alright: Changing the Broken Narrative of Black Women in America. Midwestern affability is her superpower; you’d never know The Washington Post once called her “…half myth-buster, half crusader and all the way fed up.” She likes Converse sneakers, margaritas and “cozy” mystery TV shows. She is ride or die for black women and girls. Housework is not her ministry. 1. On the nightstand: Apple TV remote; my reading queue: When They Call You A Terrorist by Asha Bandele and Patrisse Cullors, and New Power by Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans; aromatherapy spray; dust…an embarrassing amount of dust. Shit. I really should dust more often. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Sleeping with the TV on. It has to be on, but not too loud. I need to hear the voices on the TV, but not be able to discern what they are saying. I’ve been doing this …

TueNight 10: Nancy Nowacek

The silence around menopause is deafening. “It is easier to get people to talk about death and cancer than Menopause,” says Nancy Nowacek, artist, organizer and collaborator on Menopause: An Imperfect Guide. “Because it’s an incontrovertible milestone of age — [the secrecy] perpetuates and amplifies negative feelings women have about their age, their bodies, their very selves.” To that end, she’s created M_________, The Menopause Project, a pilot pop-up shop in Brooklyn, August 17-19, featuring experts in psychology, health, nutrition, pilates and powerlifting. The goal is to bring publicity, education and community to an experience common to, ahem, half the world’s population. “If we start joining together, in public, and learn about how our bodies are actually running incredible defensive plays, we can dedicate our hard-won experience, love and care to the rest of the world and start to lift the curtain on the mystery, shame, and confusion of what it means to enter the middle of our lives.” An artist by trade, Nancy has been working in design, play and the built environment for the past several …

TueNight 10: Crystal Durant

She’s an artist, an educator, a model, a DJ, a singer, a writer and for many a muse — Crystal is undoubtedly a modern renaissance woman.  These days she writes for The Z Review, sings in a monthly tribute show with F*BOMB at Arlene’s Grocery, and has her own Prince Purple Rain tribute band. In her own words, she’s a “magnet for all kinds of crazy, always smells like fresh flowers, and is waiting for the right guy to show up, man up, and make a semi-honest woman outta me”. Crystal had us all in stitches with her love of Seinfeld quotes at last month’s TueNight Live: 90s Bitch. Here’s her TueNight 10: 1. On the nightstand: A bottle of water, the TV remote, my signature necklaces, and my limited edition, highly sought after, collectible, Flava Flav alarm clock, SIGNED BY FLAV HIMSELF. It wakes me up by yelling, “YEAAAAAAAAHHHH BOYYYYEEEE!” No joke.  2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Cutting the neck out and the sleeves off of my t-shirts because they’re too constricting.  I think this is why people always ask if I’m a Rock Star, because …

TueNight 10: Glynnis MacNicol

In her just published memoir, No One Tells You This, Glynnis MacNicol chronicles her 40th year as a single woman without children, and what it means to live without a blueprint. “The narratives we have around women’s live are very narrow — nearly every story ends with a marriage or a baby. I wanted to tell a story that ended with neither, and yet was (hopefully) still compelling and reflected some truths about my own life and the lives so many women I know are living. And living well!” Amen! Glynnis is the co-founder of a women’s networking group called TheLi.st, and has written for The New York Times, The Guardian, The Cut, and many others. Here is her TueNight 10: 1. On the nightstand: My Year of Rest and Relaxation by Ottessa Moshfegh. I’ve only read the first few pages but already find myself eager to get back to it. I love the premise of a woman alone in a room; it feels like a strange, appealing subversion of A Room of One’s Own;  Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke …

TueNight 10: Allison Yarrow

Over the last few years author Allison Yarrow has been reinvestigating the stories that were told (and sold) about women in the 90s, culminating in her new book 90s Bitch: Media, Culture, and the Failed Promise of Gender Equality. (She shared some of her wisdom last week at TueNight Live!) On tour for her book, Allison says, “I love meeting people and discussing how narratives about women shaped a generation and the current moment. Writing a book about history has encouraged me to reflect on my own history and how what I watched, read, and heard shaped my own upbringing and the person I am today.” An award-winning journalist, Allison has written for the New York Times, the Washington Post, Vox, and many others. She was a TED resident and produced the (amazing) VICE documentary Misconception. Raised in Macon, Georgia, Allison now lives in Brooklyn, New York. 1. On my nightstand: Like A Mother by Angela Garbes, Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler, No One Tells You This by Glynnis MacNicol, Brave Not Perfect by Reshma Saujani, and How Not to Get Shot: And Other …

TueNight Live: Photos from “90’s Bitch” at The Invisible Dog

Last week, on July 17, TueNight Live rolled back a few decades to celebrate our latest issue —  90’s BITCH. Over 80 people gathered in the beautiful Brooklyn art space The Invisible Dog Art Center to listen to stories from Lunachick Theo Kogan, DJ and modern muse Crystal Durant, artist and author Jenny Laden and TueNight founder Margit Detweiler and a discussion with author Allison Yarrow and her newly released book 90s Bitch: Media, Culture and the Failed Promise of Gender Equality.  On the walls of the space we featured beautiful art by Anne Mourier, Erika Hokanson, Maya Sariahmed, Vanessa Belli, Jenny Laden and Vadis Turner. We sang along to our 90s Spotify playlist. It was a blast (from the past) to nosh, drink and gab with so many friends and fans of TueNight. All photos by the talented Erika Hokanson. A beautiful — albeit muggy — July night at The Invisible Dog. Friends gathered, including artists from the building like Claudia Paneca and featured artist Anne Mourier.       We also picked up a little fresh produce from …

TueNight 10: Amy Sohn

Amy Sohn kicked off her writing career in the mid 90s with an autobiographical column in the New York Press called “Female Trouble,” where she chronicled frustrating dates with comedians, drummers, actors, and playwrights, some of whom wrote in to the newspaper to rebut her accounts, even using the monikers she gave them in the column. She got a lot of hate mail. She closed out the decade in 1999 with her first novel, Run, Catch, Kiss, which launched with a reading at the B&N on Astor Place and party at Joe’s Pub, which had recently opened. Those were the days! She still had her finger on the pulse a decade later, with her controversial novel, Prospect Park West, which skewered the Brooklyn neighborhood for all of its precious eccentricities. She even got the Park Slope Food Coop (where she is still a member) to sell copies of the book. “I’m currently working on a narrative nonfiction project for FSG about feminists in the 19th century, a group of women who lived when you couldn’t send information about contraception through …

TueNight 10: Sara Berliner

In no way a career minimalist, Sara Berliner has been a puppeteer, documentary filmmaker, ethnographer, festival producer, children’s book writer, content curator, digital strategist, and always an activist. This spring she launched Vote Like a Motherto make parenthood and empathy a lens for political engagement. With t-shirts and totes inspired by a sign she made for the March for Our Lives, Vote Like a Mother funnels time/money/voices to essential nonprofits doing the hard daily work on social justice crises of all kinds. “When I graduated college with a degree in Folklore & Mythology (yup, that’s a thing) I knew I wanted to tell stories and help other people tell theirs. Making and expressing meaning was important to me. I figured ‘my thing’ would emerge, but it turns out I’m not directed like a person who always knew they’d be a doctor. This year, I felt called to ramp up my social activism. Vote Like a Mother was the lightning striking.” Here’s her TueNight 10: 1. On the nightstand: Muji eye mask. Sunday Morning lip balm from Love + Sage. …

TueNight 10: Kathryn Finney

Kathryn Finney is a major game-changer in the world of entrepreneurship and tech for Black and LatinX women, as the founder of digitalundivided. In 2016, they released an internal research study called ProjectDiane that literally changed the startup world overnight. The latest update of the report is getting a ton of press for its revelations that more black women than ever are starting businesses, and yet the funding for them lags behind. “We all want to live a creative life that we control. We want to know that our time on this earth mattered, even if it’s to just one person. It’s an honor to know that the work you’ve done has changed people’s lives for the better, but there’s also a great deal of responsibility that comes with this honor. I spend 99% of my day trying to balance this responsibility while also working hard at being a great mom, a boss, a wife, a thought leader, a daughter, and a friend.” Here is Kathryn’s TueNight 10:1. On the nightstand: How to Slay by Constance White, 100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez …