All posts tagged: Election

Lift Every Voice And Sing: A Q&A with Activist and Singer Abby Dobson

The night before Donald Trump’s inauguration, two black feminist icons — Alice Walker and Angela Davis — spoke at the annual Peace Ball in Washington, D.C. offering two key messages about the intersection of art and activism. Walker revealed that the creation of art was one of her five tools of resistance. Davis noted that right now, “We need art, we need music, we need poetry.” Davis and Walker both understand the healing power of art, especially for women who feel under assault under the current administration. Jamaican-born Abby Dobson is a vocalist who carries with her both the activism of Angela and the art of Alice in her song. Dobson says she uses her gifts to birth powerful “genre-nonconforming” music, which is deeply resonant, at times mournful, in turns joyful, but always authentic. Dobson is currently Artist in Residence for the African American Policy Forum, a gender-equity organization founded by the “mother of intersectionality,” Dr. Kimberle Crenshaw. Dobson was featured in Crenshaw’s TED Talk (see below) singing as part of the #SayHerName campaign, a movement to bring …

Why I Marched: 9 Women Across The Country Share Their Reasons

Planned as a protest in Washington, D.C. to the inauguration of the 45th President of the United States the day before, the January 21st  Women’s March on Washington surpassed all expectations of size and scope. Millions of people showed up in D.C. and in cities all over the country—and beyond that to all seven continents—to march, chant, and listen to speakers, united in focus on resisting Donald Trump’s agenda. Many of the women wore the famed pink knit “pussy hats,” although headgear was entirely optional, and most carried signs with pro-woman and equality, anti-Trump and fascism messages.  I talked to several women about why they marched, what steps they plan to take next, and if they consider this day the birth of a movement. Sandie Angulo Chen, writer Maryland I marched in Atlanta while attending the American Library Association’s annual midwinter conference. I marched because as Rep. John Lewis reminded us, we can’t afford for our nation to take even one step backwards when it comes to human rights, civil rights, women’s rights. Since then, …

The Season of Giving In

I’m just going to come out and say it: I am not doing well. I am spent. I am drained. And now we are entering the season of giving? Ladies, I don’t know about you, but I am tapped out. I’m a mom of two boys, two and four years old. They are brilliant little crazed monkey lunatics. My heart is on my sleeve and in my throat every minute of the day. It’s exhausting. Strangers see my tight face in the grocery store as my boys have a screaming match in aisle 9 and offer me, “These are the days! You don’t want to miss them!” Seriously? Cause I gotta tell ya, if I ever have a moment to myself, I am daydreaming about dropping them both off at a highly-rated Charter school with after-hour yoga care while I, I don’t know, take a hike or finish reading a paragraph in a magazine or simply do the dishes without someone clinging to my leg or wiping their nose on my jeans. I’m also gut-wrenchingly …

We Toast 2016: Some Good Things Actually Happened

(Graphic: Adrianna Dufay/TueNight) Man, it has been a shitty year. From the music world alone, we lost Bowie, Prince, Leonard Cohen and Sharon Jones. We lost our chance at electing the first woman president of the United States. And, everyday, we get to watch our buffoon of a President Elect attempt to distract us from his disastrous cabinet appointments with the Twitter stream of a toddler. Good times! Still, throughout this terrible year, many wonderful things did bring us joy. We asked several TueNight contributors to write in with their toasts to some of their favorite moments of the year. Mallory Kasdan 2016 has been marred by loss and violence constant enough to numb. So I’ve found it helpful to cling to art, and especially to music, as a salve. Released days after a disastrous and surreal presidential election, A Tribe Called Quest’s final album WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE THANK U 4 YOUR SERVICE is potent and prescient, calling out for justice and healing in these raw times. Phife Dawg, who died suddenly …

Editor’s Note: We Raise Our Glass (You Bet Your Ass)

(Photo: Wikipedia) Salud! Sláinte! A votre santé! Gan Bei! L’Chaim! We couldn’t think of a better way to kick off the holiday season than a TueNight issue devoted to toast(s). It has been a doozy of a year. The last month, in particular, has left many of us on the floor, wondering where we are as a country and how we can possibly face what’s in front of us. But in the spirit of brighter futures, we decided to take time to celebrate the good that we have in our world right now. As we looked back on 2016, we thought about who and/or what we wanted to toast the most: YOU. The TueNight community. To all of you who have contributed your own stories this year. To everyone who came to the Pussy Party in November. To anyone who commented on our Facebook and Instagram posts or tweeted and re-tweeted. To those who commented on our stories and responded to our writers. To our survey participants. To every TueNight reader. There are far too …

I’m Muslim. Don’t Tell Me It Will All Be Okay

The day after the election, I woke up crying. Not really sobbing — I just had a steady stream of tears rolling down my face. I was sad and incredibly disappointed. I pulled myself together, got my son his breakfast and then stopped, remembered, and the tears started again. I started working, and that’s when my phone started buzzing with texts all day: “thinking of you” or “I love you” or “are you ok?” and the tears would fall once again. I hopped on conference calls and someone would start the call innocently, “How’s your day?” And I couldn’t even lie: “Honestly, I’m not good today,” and we’d spend the first 10 minutes talking about what the eff just happened. It was a hard, sad day that left me heartbroken. I’m a Muslim, and half of this country doesn’t want me here. It doesn’t matter that I was born here or that I’m sixth-generation American. It doesn’t matter that no matter the linage we’re all AMERICAN, whether by birth or because we came here and became …

Post-Election Do’s and Don’ts: Everyday Tips to Be a Better Human

DO: Engage in conversations, even if they’re difficult. Be mindful of your spending; vote with your dollar. Have coffee or share a meal with someone who you think is different from you. If you see someone being harassed, use your privilege to protect them. Do your own research by reading independent journalists and non-mainstream media. Speak up. Document hate crimes and hate speech. Make an effort to smile at someone; it could turn their day around and make them feel less lonely. Educate yourself on issues of racial justice. Challenge your thinking and behavior. Amplify voices that may not be mainstream. Be mindful in your consumption. Get to know your neighbors. Build your local community. — Suzan Bond and Kia M. Ruiz. Suzan Bond is a Fast Company contributor and the founder of Bet On Yourself, which supports independent internet creators through business, marketing, and branding strategy.  Kia M. Ruiz is a environmental and consumer resource consultant. You can read more of her writing at Bodhibear.net.   DON’T: Assume that you can pick up stakes and move to Canada. Or New Zealand. Or anywhere else. If you’re serious about becoming an expat, form a logical plan and know that …

Teaching Your Children Empathy: 15 Resources for Parents and Guardians

The 2016 presidential election made one thing clear: Empathy is sorely lacking in our society. Empathy, like racism, sexism, prejudice and bigotry, is learned at home. Here is a short list of ways you can teach your child to love, respect and value those who do not look or act like her.  1. Go beyond a play date. It’s easy to look inclusive when meeting at a neutral location but actually take an interest in your child’s ethnically or religiously diverse classmates. Hang out at their home or in their neighborhood and see how they live. More from Urban Moms NYC.  2. Be a good sport. Talk with your children about what a good sportsman looks like. More from KidsHealth.org. 3. Go help someone. The holiday season is around the corner. Invite a neighbor or classmate over for dinner. Deliver meals to boys and girls clubs, senior living facilities, then stay and engage with them. Show your kids how to shine their light on others. More from Volunteer Match. 4. Failure is your friend. It builds character, teaches humility and resilience. Encourage your child to make mistakes. More from Business …

Events, Rallies and Parties for Change: A Nationwide List

As thousands of demonstrators across America react to the election of Donald Trump, many of us will continue to look for ways to effect change, protest and find solidarity, comfort and inspiration in one another.  From rallies and marches to vigils and brainstorming meetings, hundreds of events are being planned for people to gather and make our voices heard.  Here is a sampling of events scheduled around the country in the days and weeks ahead. Be sure to confirm details and keep checking your social media feeds, local news outlets, community centers and places of worship.  The “secret” Facebook group Pantsuit Nation has a comprehensive list of events. We’ll be updating this list from time to time. Wednesday, December 14 New York, NY–Young Women and Political America, with Susannah Wellford The Comaraderie NYC brings together an evening with Susannah Wellford, president and founder of Running Start, a Washington DC based non-partisan organization working to bring women to the forefront of the political landscape. Wellford will discuss “a broad range of information covering the workings of political America, the …

Your Post-Election Checklist for Taking Action, Taking Care and Dealing with Your Feelings

It’s only been a week. And yet, here we are. After the 2016 presidential election results we find ourselves distraught, depressed and still in shock. When we feel this confused and despondent, we here at TueNight like to ground ourselves in lists, action items and game plans. What can we do to help? What’s next in the fight? Where can we go to find peace? How can we help our kids? How can we make sure we’re being good allies and opening up our hearts and minds? To that end, we enlisted our TueNight crew and friends to compile a massive checklist of everything we might need right this very minute. It’s a very special edition of TueNight that we hope will both mobilize you and give you some peace. Clip-n-Save… Self-Care Tips When You Are Utterly Devastated — Karrie Myers Taylor Post-Election Do’s and Don’ts: Everyday Tips to Be a Better Human — Suzan Bond, Kia M. Ruiz, Madeleine Deliee Events, Rallies and Parties for Change: A Nationwide List — Gina Zucker 14 Ways to Be an Ally Right …

TueNight Live: Photos From Our Pussy Party

We had to do something. So we decided to host a Pussy Party — an election-prepping, Thursday night edition of our typical TueNight Live events. For this live storytelling evening, where we read many of the stories in this issue, we partnered with Industrious, who hosted us in their lovely Brooklyn second floor cafe. Through ticket and t-shirt sales, and a matching offer from the Harnisch Foundation, we were able to donate $1000 to RAINN and $1000 to Crisis Text Line. Here are some of the photos from a rowdy, sassy and moving evening of tales, courage and women.   TueNight Editor-in-Chief Margit started us off with her Pussy Grabs Back t-shirt and a big party whoop.   Diane Di Costanzo warmed up the crowd with her piece The Boss of Me  —  the true story of a naive new hire and a too-forward boss.   Powerhouse Hitha Herzog brought her perspective about being a feminist on Fox News. And Instagram star Melinda Alexander (@MuMuMansion) wowed us via video with her plan for us all to #GetFree. As always, the crowd used break …