All posts tagged: Frequency

10 Ways We Remember When Music Was a “Thing”

Remember when music was a physical object — before it was just an ethereal file floating from one digital device to another? There were technical snafus, social mores and some heavy lifting that went along with the era of vinyl and magnetic tape. Herein, a few: 1. Using a pencil to fix an unraveling cassette tape. 2. Moving boxes and boxes of LPs from dorm room to apartment to apartment (Sorry, Dad.) 3. Merging record and CD collections with your partner. My rule: Do not merge until married. (And even then, Dave Matthews is never allowed to mingle) via GIPHY 4. Taping over someone else’s mixtape. The ultimate diss.    5. Using Scotch tape as a cassette-tape wonder tool. By taping over the little notches on top to record a mixtape over an unwanted cassette. 6. 8-Track Tapes And that satisfying sound of the 8-track tape clicking and connecting into its gears in your parents’ Buick Regal car radio. 7. When people actually cared about speakers. via GIPHY 8. Losing the 45 spider Aka that …

The Magic of the Mixtape

Picture it: New York City, 1988. I was 13 years old, browsing Nobody Beats the Wiz for the best pack of four, 90-miniute TDK cassette tapes that I could afford. Because I had a big weekend ahead. A big weekend of mixtape making. I had one to make for my best friend’s birthday, one for my “boyfriend’s” return from camp (who, I was soon to learn, found a new “girlfriend” at said camp — had I known this, my tape would have taken on an entirely different tone), and one for my sister, who I loved to impress with (and introduce her to) new, “in-the-know” tunes, since was she’s 11 years my senior. A quick side note for those who are already feeling me: Cassette Store Day is on September 7th. Check out the events and locations and get ready for some serious nostalgia (and swapping, if you still have some of your old mixes). But make sure to ask yourself first, are you truly willing to part with that piece of personal history? The …

Day Job: Radio DJ

Who: Maria Milito What’s your day job? I keep people company on air. I’m a radio DJ for the New York classic rock station, Q104.3. My shift is during the workday, 9am until 2pm. How long have you been a DJ? I’ve been at Q104.3 for 17 years. I’ve been DJing a long time. You don’t like to share your age? It’s funny, I have like 20-year-old listeners who think I’m hipper than their parents and their parents are actually younger than me. And then I have people who listen to me and think they listened to me when they came back from Vietnam. But I can’t tell them that I’m not that old. So that’s why I’m always pretty generic about it. Where did you grow up? Hicksville, Long Island. My family is from Brooklyn and they did the big Italian exodus in the ’50s to Staten Island, New Jersey and Long Island. How did you get into radio? I got a Bachelor’s degree in Communication Arts from New York Tech in Old Westbury. …

Then & Now: Your End-of-Summer Mixtape

Discovering bands that are fresh for your end-o-summer playlist — and actually good to listen to — can be tricky and time-consuming. And you have to know who to trust (“But Aunt Margit, Carly is AWE-some!”) To that end, we’ve compiled a few bands  you might like, based on some old sounds you probably already know. Our picks aren’t all brand new, but a few have gone under the radar, and we insist you listen: 1. Slightly sappy, ’70s singer songwriters Then: Seals & Croft, “Summer Breeze.” Now: The Autumn Defense, “Back of My Mind.” While their album Once Around (2010) isn’t new, we can’t get enough of these two ex-Wilco bandmates and their California, easy, breezy pop groove. “Back of My Mind” is a standout for September.   2. Edgy, unclassifiable R&B Then: Erykah Badu, “On & On.” Now: Lianne La Havas, “Forget.” Is Your Love Big Enough (2012)  is a melange of jazz, pop, R&B and rock, and this 24-year-old’s emotional debut album is a stunner (and woefully overlooked.)   3. Peace, love …

How I Became an Empty Nester at 43

When I was busily raising a human being, I didn’t have time to consider she would eventually be raised. And here we are. My 16-year-old daughter, Cleo, will live in India for a year and attend her senior year of high school while staying with a host family. When she returns, Cleo will head off to college. Well-meaning friends and relatives ask me what I’m “going to do” when my daughter leaves. I’ll be alone for the first time since I married her father when I was 24. My answer: I don’t know. When Cleo was a newborn, her father and I moved to Kansas “temporarily” so that we could live near relatives and I could start my career. When I pictured my future, I saw myself standing in fields by a picturesque farm. I envisioned living in a cute little white house with a porch swing, big garden and a pygmy goat named Piglet. Instead, I’m divorced. To be exact, I’m twice divorced. (Even worse, I divorced not one, but two bald drummers.) And …

Secrets of a Second-Career Intern

When I left my last magazine job in 2008, it seemed there were exactly zero print publications left worthy to work for. I had devoted 20 years of my career to the magazine industry, but it was no secret that the field was going down the tubes. Also, If had to edit one more piece on why blueberries are a superfood, there was a good chance I would slide under the desk into a fetal position and never come out. I was burned out and my well of work ideas had run bone dry. So when a friend told me about the jumpstart she got from her career coach, I went to see him. One of the first exercises he gave me was simply to muse about my job: Turn off the censor in my head, and make a list of the places I would love to work. The first name that popped in my head was WNYC, the public radio station in New York City. I’d done a slew of radio interviews during my …

Artistic Endeavors as Sung By Billy Ocean

I spoke to the fine people of the Big Traveling Potluck in April 2013 about how to invest in their creativity — with some tips from 80s pop/R&B sensation Billy Ocean. It was a long talk (near 40 minutes). I spoke before Ree Drummond. Yeah. Her. And after Matt Bites, someone I’ve obsessively followed online for at least 5 years. So, no small pressure to make the magic happen, HJ. Here’s a portion of my presentation: Get out of my dreams and into my car. And by car, I mean, into your best creative work. And here, by your best creative work, I mean, consistently creating images, moving pictures and words in combination to publish on the internet. It’s no small responsibility, to have the chance for the world to bear witness to your work. It’s no small disappointment when no one seems to take notice. It’s strange too, in all of human history; we didn’t have this kind of work. We worked in small groups satisfying our basic needs. And now we’re alone, bearing witness to our perceived …