All posts tagged: Grateful

Why Don’t My White Friends Talk About Race? Here’s What They Told Me

My anger was palpable long before the announcement by the grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri. I was already antsy. Wanting to fight. Craving some sort of confrontation, as I often do when life doesn’t hand me lemons, but lobs them at my head. When I learned a decision was made, I was ready. I wanted to go in and tell people what I really thought of them and, most importantly, their silence. I am a feisty person and when I hurt, I use my words not for good but for bad. This pain was amplified by knowing full well that Darren Wilson wouldn’t be indicted. A feeling that many of us had sitting at the bottom of our guts like a heavy meal. I wanted my friends, my largely white, female following, to get angry, to say something and to feel that hurt. So, as a writer, I used my words. I put out 140 characters that explained exactly how I felt: I would love to see those social justice/social good folks to at least …

The Super Weird Thing I’m Thankful For

We asked a few of our contributors for the things they’re thankful for — not the obvious things, like family, food, water, health — but those little intrinsic things only they can appreciate. A dishwasher named Sven is perhaps my favorite.  In fact, two of our contributors actually named their beloved inanimate objects, because they are so fond of them. Let the weird begin… Vamps I can’t live without trashy romance novels, the worse the better, even better if they involve vampires — did I just write that out loud? Guess I did. There is nothing like a bad romance novel to wipe out the convoluted work of trying to build a tech start up and dealing with wireframes and coding by day. —Adaora Udoji Zzzs with JJ JJ is my travel-size down pillow. I really don’t think I could sleep without him. I come from a long line of pillow-namers 🙂 I can roll it up and put it in my suitcase! —Wendy Goldman Scherer Pick Up The Damn Phone I am thankful for people who still …

How a Community of Drug-Users Saved Us From Violence

In the mid-1990s, I worked for Philadelphia’s needle exchange program, Prevention Point. Twenty-plus years later, I cherish the community that the needle exchange created — that odd and random assortment of people of all ages, races, economic strati and degrees of addiction. The ties that bound us seemed so tenuous. Hundreds of people would line up at the sites — street corners in Kensington or Germantown known for open-air drug markets, sex work and gun violence. And we, the “helpers,” would arrive in a van to distribute supplies that would prevent the spread of HIV, Hepatitis C and other infectious diseases. I didn’t know then that I would be helped at least as much as I helped others. Many of the exchangers (people who used the needle exchange) were extremely tense when they arrived at a site because they were jonesing and had been waiting for a clean needle. To an outsider, our safety may have seemed at risk though those of us who volunteered or worked at the needle exchange rarely gave it a …