All posts tagged: Racism

14 Ways to Be an Ally Right Now

The physical and emotional well being of our friends and families require that we show up. This means leveraging our privilege, should it come in the form of religion, class, gender, race, etc., to fight against the tide of awfulness that’s coming. Here are some ways to do it: 1. Walk folks who have been specifically targeted by Trump (Muslims, Latinos, etc) home. This form is for New Yorkers who are willing to accompany their neighbors on their commute in light of recent harassment and threats toward people of color, LGBTQ folks, and Muslims. 2. Diversify your media consumption. If everyone you follow on Twitter is white and straight, and if you’re getting all your news from CNN, you’re doing it wrong. 3. Do not dismiss or diminish people’s fear. People are not overreacting, and it’s not your job to tell them to be positive. 4. Distribute information to other allies so targeted folks don’t have more work to do. 5. Make yourself available to friends who need help/support securing a passport, going to the doctor, and other things …

tuenight first job black at school kelly wickham

Being Black at School: A Teacher Creates a Better Classroom

I was born in Chicago, raised on the south side and Hyde Park, and finished high school in the south suburbs. My upbringing was so diverse that there didn’t appear to be a dominant culture. It wasn’t until we went to the suburbs that I asked my white mother, “Where did all these white people come from?” My dad is Black, and all our friends were a blend of countless cultures. In that very white environment, I found myself searching for any kind of color and I also began to hear, for the first time, about how proud the people were for being colorblind. It’s funny that I’ve only ever heard this expression from white people who use it as a way to let others know how great they are for not considering color. It’s even funnier that they never notice the absence of color when they’re surrounded by homogenous populations. After graduation, I continued south to college and then again to start my career as a high school teacher. My first professional job came …

Why Don’t My White Friends Talk About Race? Here’s What They Told Me

My anger was palpable long before the announcement by the grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri. I was already antsy. Wanting to fight. Craving some sort of confrontation, as I often do when life doesn’t hand me lemons, but lobs them at my head. When I learned a decision was made, I was ready. I wanted to go in and tell people what I really thought of them and, most importantly, their silence. I am a feisty person and when I hurt, I use my words not for good but for bad. This pain was amplified by knowing full well that Darren Wilson wouldn’t be indicted. A feeling that many of us had sitting at the bottom of our guts like a heavy meal. I wanted my friends, my largely white, female following, to get angry, to say something and to feel that hurt. So, as a writer, I used my words. I put out 140 characters that explained exactly how I felt: I would love to see those social justice/social good folks to at least …