All posts tagged: TueNight10

TueNight 10: Michele Carlo

Michele Carlo became a performer at 35.  “I was at a crossroads in my life and figured, eff it, let me go for it. I didn’t want to face my last moments knowing I’d wussed out from trying the one thing I knew I wanted to do. And now it’s over 20 years later and I’m still at it.” The native New Yorker, Nuyorican and “natural redhead,” has done everything from performance art to improv/comedy to emcee burlesque shows. She discovered storytelling at a MothSlam in 2003, and has performed at many of their Mainstage shows in NYC. Her first book,  Fish Out Of Agua: My Life on Neither Side of the (Subway) Tracks, is a NYC set memoir based on her early Moth stories. It was a real treat to have her perform at our recent TueNight Birthday Bash! In Michele’s “free” time she curates/produces/co-hosts two storytelling shows: “No Name Super Storytellers” at the Word Up bookstore in Washington Heights and “New York Story Exchange” at the Cornelia Street Café. She also hosts a radio show/podcast …

TueNight 10: Tamar Anitai

Tamar Anitai making everyone laugh at the Birthday Bash (Photo: Simon Courchel) If you haven’t experienced a Tamar Anitai story, this might be the time to read one (if you’re like us, you could use a good laugh right about now.)  She wins the award, too, for the most far-reaching topics: Kale, No Kids, Sleep Gurus, Slang, Germs and Creepy Babies. She also stirred up some controversy in TueNighters with her epic tampon tossing thread. Tamar turned 40 recently and, after a long career as a digital editor and writer, she’s now director of audience engagement for a multinational healthcare consumer company. But that’s certainly not all she is. “I’m trying to learn to not define myself by my work/day job,” says Tamar, “Is that a thing women do? I do, and I’m curious about how that changes — or doesn’t change — as we get older. I’m working on it as I try to be a more mindful, meditating type of person.” As to her home life, Tamar has a lovely husband and two cats “one of whom has really unfortunate teeth that are literally rotting and …

TueNight 10: Soraya Chemaly

Soraya at the Women’s Right to Rally. (Photo courtesy of Soraya Chemaly)  Why are we so filled with rage, like, all the damn time? We can think of a few reasons… Soraya Chemaly‘s new collection of essays, Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger hits at the root causes of that anger, how it affects us in every aspect of our lives, and how we might, in fact, celebrate it.  Rage is something we’ve been trained to hide, suggests Soraya. In Rage she writes,”This desire not to be disliked or seen as crazy, irrational, or dangerous, masks the lack of control that we already live with as the result of the silencing, sublimating, denying, and social opprobrium.”Time to let your rage flag fly. An award-winning writer, activist, and director of the Women’s Media Center Speech Project, Soraya has been traveling all over the country to promote Rage. “Being on book tour is so very different from writing a book,” she says, “It’s been fun, but hard to adjust from being basically solitary to being intensely social…One of the most interesting parts has been how difficult …

TueNight 10: Jamia Wilson

Jamia Wilson is quite fond of the Florynce Kennedy quote, “Don’t agonize! Organize!” — a sentiment which prompted her to co-create the kick-ass guide, Road Map for Revolutionaries: Advocacy for All, just out today (Happy Pub Day!). “In the post-Trump frenzy, I turned to books written by strong women disruptors as a roadmap for what to do, says Jamia who co-authored the book with Elisa Camahort Page and Carolyn Gerin. “I was compelled to collaborate on a direct, snappy guidebook that showcases tools you need to ignite the change you want to see in the world.”Jamia is also the director of Feminist Press, the author of Young, Gifted, and Black, and she wrote the oral history in Together We Rise: Behind the Scenes at the Protest Heard Around the World.  Carolina-born and Saudi Arabia raised, she currently lives in New York City, where she’s an adjunct professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice.“I love teaching undergraduate classes about gender studies and revolutions,” she says. “We can learn so much from the past to help inform a better future.” 1. On the nightstand: Training School for Negro …

TueNight 10: Theo Kogan

Theo Kogan is a makeup artist, musician, native Brooklynite, activist and mom. She is well known for being the singer of the Lunachicks, a band of best friends who happened to be girls. Theo and her pals started the band in high school just for fun; they ended up touring the world through the ’90s, becoming one of the Riot Grrrl bands of the era, and opening up for many of the legendary pop-punk bands of the day. She was a NY nightlife muse, and one of the first heavily tattooed fashion models/actors. We were thrilled when Theo made her live reading debut at TueNight Live: 90s Bitchin July. She has two essays in the forthcoming book Women Who Rock, which is being released next month. You can pre-order a copy now, so do it! She is currently painting faces in New York Fashion Week. Literally. Right now. 1. On the nightstand: There’s a stack of books (seriously) but what I am reading is The Power by Naomi Alderman… for the past 6 months. Clearly I don’t get much time to read. Also tissues, my Hurraw! …

TueNight 10: Adaora Udoji

“I am utterly obsessed with all things emerging tech; that means a lot of artificial intelligence, blockchain, virtual reality, and augmented reality, among others.” Adaora Udoji proves that it’s never too late for career reinvention. She started in the law, transitioned to broadcast news, corporate strategy to digital startups, to venture capital and “well, now I’m looking forward to working from a bigger platform in the near future, stay tuned.”   She is loving her recent appointment as an Entrepreneur-in-Residence at WeWorks Lab in NYC.  “I consider myself truly fortunate to be working and consulting with extraordinary entrepreneurs, technologists, investors, and corporations who are at the cutting edge or trying to be.” What is her greatest lesson so far? “I can’t be different from who I am and that’s all good. I’m perfectly imperfect just like the next person. I do myself a favor every time I remember that and allow myself to follow my gut even if it’s taking me down an unconventional path. I gain something truly with each experience, whether I enjoyed it or not.” …

TueNight 10: Jo Piazza

Jo Piazza with her son at a UFO viewing center in Southern Colorado(photo courtesy of Jo Piazza) “I’m finally at a point in my life where I can say my job is to make cool shit,” says Jo Piazza, TueNight contributor, author of seven books and former editor at Yahoo, Current TV and New York Daily News. Jo’s latest novel is Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win (Simon and Schuster), about a woman running for Senate in the most important race in the country during a midterm election. “I feel like writing Charlotte, this fearless and ambitious woman, has given me more confidence. I’m finally advocating for myself in a way I was afraid to in my 20s and early 30s. It’s funny because when I was younger I really had nothing to lose. I had no family, no mortgage, no health concerns. Now I have all of those things, but for some reason I feel less afraid.” Jo has been driving from coast to coast, promoting her new book.”My goal is to start a big ass conversation about women, ambition, power and leadership.” Amidst it all, Jo …

TueNight 10: Tamara Winfrey Harris

Tamara Winfrey Harris is a stealth radical. She writes about race, gender and their intersection with politics, pop culture and current events. She graciously joined us in The Hotbed last month for a lively discussion of her book, The Sisters Are Alright: Changing the Broken Narrative of Black Women in America. Midwestern affability is her superpower; you’d never know The Washington Post once called her “…half myth-buster, half crusader and all the way fed up.” She likes Converse sneakers, margaritas and “cozy” mystery TV shows. She is ride or die for black women and girls. Housework is not her ministry. 1. On the nightstand: Apple TV remote; my reading queue: When They Call You A Terrorist by Asha Bandele and Patrisse Cullors, and New Power by Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans; aromatherapy spray; dust…an embarrassing amount of dust. Shit. I really should dust more often. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Sleeping with the TV on. It has to be on, but not too loud. I need to hear the voices on the TV, but not be able to discern what they are saying. I’ve been doing this …

TueNight 10: Nancy Nowacek

The silence around menopause is deafening. “It is easier to get people to talk about death and cancer than Menopause,” says Nancy Nowacek, artist, organizer and collaborator on Menopause: An Imperfect Guide. “Because it’s an incontrovertible milestone of age — [the secrecy] perpetuates and amplifies negative feelings women have about their age, their bodies, their very selves.” To that end, she’s created M_________, The Menopause Project, a pilot pop-up shop in Brooklyn, August 17-19, featuring experts in psychology, health, nutrition, pilates and powerlifting. The goal is to bring publicity, education and community to an experience common to, ahem, half the world’s population. “If we start joining together, in public, and learn about how our bodies are actually running incredible defensive plays, we can dedicate our hard-won experience, love and care to the rest of the world and start to lift the curtain on the mystery, shame, and confusion of what it means to enter the middle of our lives.” An artist by trade, Nancy has been working in design, play and the built environment for the past several …

TueNight 10: Amy Sohn

Amy Sohn kicked off her writing career in the mid 90s with an autobiographical column in the New York Press called “Female Trouble,” where she chronicled frustrating dates with comedians, drummers, actors, and playwrights, some of whom wrote in to the newspaper to rebut her accounts, even using the monikers she gave them in the column. She got a lot of hate mail. She closed out the decade in 1999 with her first novel, Run, Catch, Kiss, which launched with a reading at the B&N on Astor Place and party at Joe’s Pub, which had recently opened. Those were the days! She still had her finger on the pulse a decade later, with her controversial novel, Prospect Park West, which skewered the Brooklyn neighborhood for all of its precious eccentricities. She even got the Park Slope Food Coop (where she is still a member) to sell copies of the book. “I’m currently working on a narrative nonfiction project for FSG about feminists in the 19th century, a group of women who lived when you couldn’t send information about contraception through …

TueNight 10: Kathryn Finney

Kathryn Finney is a major game-changer in the world of entrepreneurship and tech for Black and LatinX women, as the founder of digitalundivided. In 2016, they released an internal research study called ProjectDiane that literally changed the startup world overnight. The latest update of the report is getting a ton of press for its revelations that more black women than ever are starting businesses, and yet the funding for them lags behind. “We all want to live a creative life that we control. We want to know that our time on this earth mattered, even if it’s to just one person. It’s an honor to know that the work you’ve done has changed people’s lives for the better, but there’s also a great deal of responsibility that comes with this honor. I spend 99% of my day trying to balance this responsibility while also working hard at being a great mom, a boss, a wife, a thought leader, a daughter, and a friend.” Here is Kathryn’s TueNight 10:1. On the nightstand: How to Slay by Constance White, 100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez …

TueNight 10: Ashley Milne-Tyte

Ashley Milne-Tyte is a radio journalist and podcaster. She was born and raised in London and moved to New York 21 years ago. She’s been hosting her podcast The Broad Experience, about women and the workplace, since 2012. Back then there was a real lack of helpful information and storytelling about women’s lives at work. She also reports for “Marketplace,” the public radio business show, hosts a podcast for Morgan Stanley, and teaches part-time at Columbia Journalism School. “Maybe I’m doing things the other way round from a lot of people. I was single for a long time and was good at it, but I always hoped I’d meet someone to share my life with. The NYC dating scene is pretty brutal but online dating finally came through for me (I truly was an early adopter, like 1999, when no one had photos in their profiles). I got married a year and a half ago at 45 to a wonderful man and am really enjoying it. I’ve always been a late bloomer. You learn a lot …

My TueNight 10: Elana Rabinovitz

Elana Rabinowitz is a self-described late bloomer. She was 24 when she learned to ride a bike; 45 when she published her first article. “After a failed attempt at fertility in my early 40’s,” says Elana, “I needed to ‘give birth’ to something, to change my life somehow, and writing did that.” She located a former professor, Susan Shapiro, and took her “Instant Gratification Takes Too Long” writing seminar. “She focused on humiliation essays, and when I read mine to the class, I was overcome with positive feedback — that became my first published piece. From there, I just kept going.” Elana has since had essays published in The New York Times and The Washington Post, and one story was just chosen to be in Chicken Soup for The Soul: The Power of Yes. By day, Elana teaches ESL at a middle school in Fort Greene, Brooklyn. 1. On the nightstand: Zadie Smith’s Feel Free, an assortment of Malcolm Gladwell Books and my travel alarm clock. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Searching for the perfect felt …

My TueNight 10: Elan Morgan

Elan Morgan is a web designer, writer, and feminist activist. They’ve spoken across North America at various conferences, on tv and radio, and at TEDx, and they’ve been seen in the Globe & Mail, Best Health, Woman’s Day, and Flow magazines. A personal blogger since 2003 with an interest in online privacy and culture, Elan’s stepped back from speaking over the last couple of years to concentrate on writing poetry and contemplating connection and love in online spaces that are specifically built to foster and sensationalize division. Everything feels very serious, so re-learning play seems like a fabulous idea. Elan is taking suggestions. Be sure to check out Elan’s Five Star Blog Round-Up and the Grace in Small Things social network they started on Facebook. Here is Elan’s TueNight 10: 1. On the nightstand: Yrsa Daley-Ward’s Bone, Mary Beard’s Women and Power, and Kurt Vonnegut’s Cat’s Cradle. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Listening to podcasts. I’m obsessive, listening to 47 and counting at 1.5-speed. 3. Jam of the minute: ShitKid’s album “Fish” turned up loud and Mount Eerie’s album “A …

TueNight 10: Elisa Camahort Page

As the co-founder and COO of scrappy-start-up-turned-global-women’s-media-company BlogHer, Inc., Elisa Camahort Page has interviewed a diverse group of women throughout the years, from Gwyneth Paltrow to Tig Notaro, from Luvvie to Martha Stewart (who, when asked if there was anything she wasn’t good at, memorably responded, “Anything I haven’t tried yet.”). Elisa now consults with entrepreneurs, thought leaders, and organizations to take their big ideas to the next level. She’s also preparing for the September 18 release of her debut book, Road Map for Revolutionaries: Resistance, Activism, and Advocacy for All, available for pre-order now. At the dawn of 2018, Elisa looked at her heaving cookbook shelves and threw down the gauntlet, “I decided to issue myself a little cooking challenge in 2018. Every day (that I’m at home and not traveling) I’m going to take out a cookbook…and make one recipe from it.” She is currently on day 45 of her #vegancookbookchallenge.” Go, Elisa! Here’s her TueNight 10: 1. On the nightstand: iPad, Apple Watch charger, glasses, pile of magazines I will never read, Sunset’s Western Garden Book (which makes me sound way more …

TueNight 10: Tausha Robertson

After working for 10+ years in private equity, Tausha Robertson is wrapping up a delicious “gap year” of self-discovery and enrichment. But she’s not exactly sitting still. For starters, she launchedMsXFactor, a site for Gen-X, multicultural women. “And guess what, it’s growing!”  Tausha has also spent time as a board member for non-profits like Global Women 4 Well-Being and Saint Louise House.  “Most importantly, I have spent time with people I love, and doing things I love, without the stress of my previous 24/7 work calling. That life afforded me the luxury of choice, but it’s time for my next chapter which will focus on my passions, authentic connections, and being fully present.”We love a good second-act story. Here’s Tausha’s TueNight 10: 1. On the nightstand: A bottle of sparkling water, the book Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products, and my iPhone. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: My personal dance parties while cooking or getting dressed. This week I was on a New Edition bender. 3. Jam of the minute: Kendrick Lamar, SZA – “All The Stars“ 4. Thing I miss: I talk to my college friends often …

TueNight 10: Sally Kohn

Sally Kohn is a woman of many, MANY reaction shots  (see above — and get your own Sally gif here!) Her face basically says what all of us are thinking. A progressive political pundit on CNN, host of the State of Resistance podcast, former community organizer, and an occasional contributor to TueNight, Kohn has a brand new book coming out in April called The Opposite of Hate (you can pre-order it now!). The book is part of her mission “to do something about the overwhelming hate and animosity in our culture,” and help us all to rise above it. These days Sally tells us she is, “trying to catch up on sleep and try this thing I’ve heard about called exercise. I spent the last year writing a book and the year before that helping cover and comment on the election and now am gearing up for an exciting book tour in the spring. So I need sleep. But who doesn’t? In between naps, I try to make the world a better place.” Sally’s TueNight 10: 1. On the nightstand: A …

TueNight 10: Deborah Copaken

After bleeding out and nearly dying this summer before fleeing to Nepal to heal, Deborah Copaken liquidated her 401K and bought herself a few months of health insurance and reassessment. Since then, she consulted with Darren Star on a new TV show; co-wrote a TV pilot with former Rolling Stone editor, Will Dana; wrote an Op-Ed for the Washington Post about sexism in the family court system; and created an unexpected viral sensation with this story in Medium. She also completed a sample chapter and proposal for a new memoir, LADYPARTS, which her agent just sent out on Friday, so fingers fucking crossed. She’s been doing a ton of photography as well, shooting photos in Nepal and corporate headshots, party, and author photos in NY, plus installing a 4’ x 5’ blow-up of a Nepal photo into the home of the doctors who helped save her. She’s starting a new photo project called SMILPh’s (Single Mothers I’d Like to Photograph), which you can support here on Patreon, if you so wish. She was just on Good Morning America last week, promoting her most recent book, THE ABC’s OF PARENTHOOD, which she co-authored and co-shot …

TueNight 10: Amy Choi

Amy S. Choi was 22 years old and working as a reporter in New York when an editor and colleague pointed out to her that there was an Amy Choi in Australia who was a porn star (good for her!) with a website (great!) but who had her same name (not good). Hence, Amy Choi became Amy S. Choi and Amy S. Choi studiously never asked what her editor was doing googling porn stars in Australia. Now, Amy is the editorial director and co-founder of The Mash-Up Americans, a website, podcast, and creative studio that explores race, culture, and identity in America. “We’re trying to get at a specific truth: What makes us who we are? The challenge is, who we are is always a moving target.” Truer words. Here is Amy’s TueNight 10.  1. On the nightstand: A month’s worth of earmarked New Yorkers. All About Love by bell hooks. Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay. The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston. My Baron Fig journal. But no pen. I don’t actually like to write in bed. My nightstand is, uh, aspirational. 2. Can’t stop won’t stop: …

TueNight 10: Stacy Morrison

At 48, Stacy Morrison never thought she’d still be figuring out what to do when she grew up. After all, she’d set her sights on being a magazine editor in fifth grade. “That sense of promise in my hands I felt every month with Seventeen magazine just hooked me,” she says. And she went on to have an award-winning career launching new titles (Time Out New York), reinventing old ones (Modern Bride, Redbook). But then, the ground beneath her shifted. “I left publishing first, and then publishing left me. And now I’m in my seventh year of WTF.” Part of that WTF has been consulting, working with clients like the music-and-yoga festival Wanderlust, or the parenting App WeeSchool, as well as doing individual coaching and writing. Author of the book Falling Apart in One Piece, Stacy has been a frequent contributor to TueNight since the very beginning, writing about everything from being crafty to owning her desire. Here’s Stacy’s TueNight 10, and here’s to all of us figuring things out as we go along. 1. On the nightstand: I’m rereading Infinite Jest, and …

TueNight 10: Greer Hendricks

After 20 years working at a major publishing house, with an impressive stable of best-selling authors (Jennifer Weiner, for one), Greer Hendricks felt restless. So, she quit. She’d long harbored a secret desire to write fiction herself, which she only shared with a few people, including her former author, Sarah Pekkanen. To Greer’s surprise, Sarah approached her about writing collaboratively. As she puts it, “I initially worried it would be copping out to work with someone else, that it would be less of an accomplishment.  Then I realized I would be crazy to turn down this opportunity.  While I had published a few personal essays and edited hundreds of books, I knew I had a lot to learn about writing an actual novel.” Their first book, The Wife Between Us, comes out next week, and has already received rave reviews. Here is Greer’s TueNight 10: 1. On the nightstand: My nightstand often looks like an unstable Jenga tower. At the moment, some of the books on the pile are Manhattan Beach, by Jennifer Egan, Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward, and The …

TueNight 10: Jessica Kringle (a.k.a. Mrs. Claus)

1. On the nightstand: Holding Down the Fort: Help and Encouragement for Wives Whose Husbands Travel; ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas; Anything by Liane Moriarty 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Reindeer games. 3. Jam of the minute: Well, I just love the new Gwen Stefani Christmas album and this duet with Blake Shelton, heavens they are cute! Reminds me of me and Kris back in the day. 4. Thing I miss: When the elves didn’t have iPhones. 5. 80’s crush: Heatmiser or Snowmeiser, take your pick. 6. Current crush: Kris of course. 7. Will whine about: Those elves! 8. Will wine about: Eggnog. 9. Best thing that happened yesterday: Donning my apron, baking gingerbread cookies while singing carols. 10. Looking forward to: December 26th.

TueNight 10: Elizabeth Bougerol

A few years ago, Elizabeth Bougerol downed two stiff drinks and ventured out to a jazz jam she’d heard about nearby. There, she sang (something she’d mostly only done in the shower) and met a piano player who shared her love of Billie Holiday, Louis Armstrong and Ray Charles. Today, the band they created out of a mission to spread the joy of traditional jazz is doing just that. Their debut album, “The Hot Sardines,” spent more than a year on the Billboard Jazz Chart, and their latest, “French Fries + Champagne,” hit no. 1 at iTunes Jazz, landing them at the Newport Jazz Festival, the Blue Note Festival in Japan, and a few hundred points in-between. Right now she’s prepping a live album, gearing up for 50+ tour dates, and working on a project celebrating the France-America love affair through jazz, slated for next fall. She’s also readying another installment of Ladies First, the NYC dance party/“celebration of badass women musicians”/Planned Parenthood fundraiser she created last year with the skint, the newsletter she co-founded. And she’s …

TueNight 10: Geeta Dalal

At 42, Geeta Dalal is both a bona fide, badass rock and roller AND a stay-at-home Mom. Full disclosure, she and Margit were in the fierce but short-lived ’90s rock band Rockula together. After roughly 13 years off from performing, writing about music and producing content for public radio, Geeta couldn’t resist returning to her axe (and not just any axe: she plays a custom-made checkerboard double-neck 24 string guitar). She now helms the Philly-based RunHideFight. She says, “I actually wrote and recorded a demo in my kids’ playroom. The kids are old enough now that I can take some time to myself. It’s like I’m 17 again, with green hair and playing shows; except this time nature has conveniently bleached my hair for me.” Listen to RunHideFight’s addictive, garage rock goodness while you read Geeta’s TueNight 10: 1. On the nightstand: Hunger Makes Me A Modern Girl by Carrie Brownstein; Queen of the Hanukkah Dosas — thank God there’s finally a kids book out there for my lil’ Hin-Jew homeys!2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Seeking the perfect guitar tone; which causes a dangerous wallet gauge …

TueNight 10: Marcelle Karp

Marcelle Karp kept true to form at our TueNight Live: SWAP back in April, when she told a room full of people that, at age 52, she’d had sex with a 25 year old in a stairwell. As the co-creator of BUST, Marcelle was at the forefront of Third Wave Feminism, touting her vibrator and encouraging women to have agency over their sexual lives. Now, she blogs at barbmagazine.com, the site she found in 2016, staying on message: have sex, have the kind of sex you want to have. She’s the mother of the comic Ruby Karp, who just published her feminist tome, Earth Hates Me and also produces and hosts the monthly stand up show, We Hope You Have Fun, at UCB EAST. #proudmama 1. On the nightstand: Earth Hates Me by Ruby Karp. Why We Sleep by Matthew Walker. Heard him on NPR. Another sign that I’m happily middle-aged. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Look, I’m just not going to stop listening to Pavement. 3. Jam of the minute: Pod Save America. 4. Thing I miss: Brownies on Avenue A. 5. 80’s crush: Springsteen. 6. Current crush: Rocky, my pug. 7. Will whine about: How people don’t return …

TueNight 10: Hitha Herzog

A powerhouse retail analyst and journalist, Hitha Herzog knows how to shop and spend — she runs her own retail and consumer spending research firm and is a regular retail analyst for MSNBC, ABC News and Fox Business. She’s also executive producer and conservative counterpart to co-host Liz Plank on the podcast Divided States of Women.  Not easy to pigeonhole, Hitha wrote for TueNight about being a Fox News Feminist and her marital issues with money in He Said/ She Said with husband, comedian Seth Herzog. Hitha’s spending philosophy?  “Abundance, not scarcity. Meaning: don’t limit your life, just spend within your means”  Preach! 1. On the nightstand: Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the creator of Nike, Phil Knight; gratitude journal; iPhone and iPad. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Advocating for young women in the workplace. 3. Jam of the minute: “Look What you Made Me Do,” by Taylor Swift. 4. Thing I miss: Fall weather. 5. 80’s crush: Michael Jackson. 6. Current crush: Seth Herzog. 7. Will whine about: Fake feminism, i.e., supporting the cause when it’s good for image and can sell product. 8. Will wine about: I don’t drink, but will stress drink chai tea over #MeToo. 9. Best thing that …

TueNight 10: Lori Leibovich

Lori Leibovich has launched some of our favorite Instagram handles. While she was director of RealSimple.com she started the popular @womenirl, featuring life’s unfiltered moments. (To wit: this kid finding Halloween candy while sitting on top of the fridge). After the Women’s March she launched the inspirational @nastysigns as well as the gorgeous, Americana-filled @ihavethisthingwithsigns. But when she’s not chronicling signage, or touring middle and high schools in NYC for her daughter and son, she’s overseeing all of Time Inc’s health coverage and is the editor in chief of Health magazine and Time Health. We were happy to get an ounce of her free time to ask her about her TueNight 10!  1. On the nightstand: Born To Run by Bruce Springsteen (I read it but I like just having it there); HelloFlo: The Guide, Period: The Everything Puberty Book for the Modern Girl by Naama Bloom (see: 5th grade daughter, above); Her Body And Other Parties: Stories by Carmen Maria Machado; Modern Loss: Candid Conversations About Grief by Rebecca Soffer and Gabrielle Birkner (galleys) 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Instagram. It’s a problem. 3. Jam of the minute: Courtney Barnett and Kurt Vile “Lotta Sea …

TueNight 10: Morra Aarons-Mele

Morra Aarons-Mele is a self-described hermit. She’s happiest working in bed. And yet, she has the big, successful career she’s always wanted. She was inspired to write her recent book, Hiding in the Bathroom: An Introvert’s Roadmap to Getting Out There (When You’d Rather Stay Home) after hearing too many introverted or anxious professionals say they couldn’t pursue their dreams of a big career because they didn’t want to be “out there” all the time. Not true at all, says Morra! And she’s the living proof. As she puts it, you can eat lunch alone, say no, never give a TEDx talk…and still have an amazing career. Hiding in the Bathroom gets into the nitty-gritty about how to do it: from business development to selling yourself to surviving professional conferences and networking events. Morra is also working on a new podcast about smashing the patriarchy. It’s way past time. 1. On the nightstand: Spy fiction (since we’re living in a very Cold War moment). The new John Le Carré, Red Sparrow, (trashy but so good), and my new obsession, Charles’ Cummings’ Thomas Kell series. Also just …

TueNight 10: Monica Lewinsky

Monica Lewinsky is one of us. She’s a Gen-Xer who figured prominently in our 20s, who had to grapple with both her nascent, female power and naive mistakes on an unforgiving international stage.  We witnessed and absorbed the presidential scandal (let’s be clear: the scandal was always his — not hers) with rapt fascination. And maybe we weren’t just watching the news; we were putting ourselves in her shoes, literally (I recall hosting a Halloween party in the late ‘90s where two people showed up in a blue dress and beret). Distancing ourselves, yet, perhaps wondering what we would have done in her place.   Owning her narrative. (Photo: Twitter) In 2017, our national conversation about how women are bullied and shamed has thankfully shifted (though there’s a shit-ton of work still to be done). And at 44, who better to lead that charge than Monica, someone who has faced down ridicule on an almost unfathomable scale — and continues to fight it in her Twitter feed to this day. Monica has become a fierce advocate for anti-bullying, collaborating on a powerful PSA and leading the #ClickWithCompassion campaign during October’s …