All posts filed under: Style

How a Dresses-Only Girl Learned to Love Jeans

Making grand, public pronouncements is often a surefire way for me to get the universe to tell me exactly how wrong I am. This was the case when I declared that “every day is no pants day” for me in an essay at Refinery29. At the time, I’d purged my closet of all but sweatpants and one pair of extremely comfortable yoga pants that I used to sleep in, after my foray into yoga. I was convinced that my fashion sense and comfort level meant I was strictly a dresses-and-skirts kind of gal, and for the most part, I still am, except for a single pair of jeans I now can’t live without. Here’s the story of my love affair with my $29.99 Old Navy SweetHeart jeans, size 12 short. [pullquote]I learned that feeling comfortable can be its own kind of sexy.[/pullquote] I was merrily going about my skirts-and-dresses life when I decided to volunteer as a dishwasher at a nonprofit restaurant. The job itself was straightforward, except for one requirement: I had to wear …

Everything You Need to Know to Find Your Perfect Jeans

I am a jeans-and-t-shirt kind of gal — always have been, always will be. There’s something so amazing about finding that perfect pair of jeans and breaking them in so they mold perfectly to your shape. I am a denim brand’s ideal customer: I’m loyal and will purchase a sack of the same pair once I find a cut I like. But why — oh God, WHY — is the process to find a pair of jeans so hard? It’s like running the Gauntlet, fraught with perils like bad dressing room lighting, the wrong underwear and branding that simply lies. Also, the cost of denim is bordering on ridiculous. There is no such thing as denim that’s so sumptuous that it merits a price tag over $150. I’m sorry, but no. Also, why is it that our asses are getting larger yet it feels like the pants are cut smaller? I don’t understand this logic, denim brands. We would like to buy your pants, but we have to be able to fit into them first. …

5 Essential Tips For Buying Designer Jeans on eBay

I’m a denim snob. Jeans are not worth my time if they’re not designer-made. I can spot a fake a mile away and yes, I will give them the stink eye. I love 7 For All Mankind but would not be caught dead in Seven7s (I’ll explain why in a minute). I take my jeans to get professionally hemmed even though I don’t own an iron. The thing is, I don’t have a budget that allows for my most oft worn item of clothing to cost upwards of $250 a pop. And honestly, as much as I love Citizens of Humanity’s skinny jeans, I can’t image ever paying the same amount of money for them as I would for a new phone. Nevertheless, I still get the jeans of my dreams — sometimes for more than half of what they would cost in stores — via that “worldwide garage sale” known as eBay. It’s the best place to buy high-end jeans that are well outside of your price range. But you have to know how …

Gloria, Calvin, Earl and Not Me: On Being a Denim Disaster

I hate jeans. I have hated jeans since, like, forever. This may be an unpopular opinion, perhaps almost un-American. But jeans almost never look good on me, and I dread the days I have to wear them. Which, if you work in the new media world in New York now, is pretty much every day. Instead, I do my best to get away with the cute dresses I love and, in the winter (if I have to) black pants. But you only have to look around a meeting once to see who, among all those young denim-clad cool girls, comes off looking more like their Sunday-best-dressed aunt. If forced, I can don a pair of Gap legging jeans (weekends or anytime we go outside of New York). But I have to tell myself they are leggings in order for me to get out the door, confidence somewhat intact. Why are jeans are so unflattering on me? I’d love for a fit specialist to explain it. I suspect it’s a combination of short legs, long torso, …

Susan’s Beauty Wish List for Fall

Honestly, the only lists I make are about beauty products. Specifically, the ones I want NOW. Autumn is such a great time of year — it’s cool but not uncomfortably so (leather jackets!), you can switch out your flip-flops for fall boots (I would sell my soul for THESE) and you can wear a little more makeup, without the fear that it will melt off under the sun. This is my current beauty wish list for the upcoming two months. 1. Red Lipstick. Fall is the only time I feel comfortable wearing a true red lip. Lipstick Queen Silver Screen Lipstick in Have Paris, $50 (If I splurge), Rimmel Moisure Renew Lipstick in Diva Red, $7 2. Red Nail Polish. I tried this color when getting a manicure last week for the TueNight party. Now I need a bottle at home! Essie Nail Polish in Jump in My Jumpsuit, $9 3. A New Blur Cream. Right now I’m obsessed with blur creams. They give your skin a filtered, “blurry” look — similar to how you appear in Instagram …

The Trend Trap: A Few Words on Wardrobe Sanity

I wish I could say that I have a wardrobe filled with amazing investment pieces, and that I’ve never fallen prey to one of those “Try the Trend” stories you see in magazines every month. I wish that were true, but it’s not. A quick glance through my closet would reveal a Western shirt from the “Cowboy” trend that was hot a few years ago, which is now gathering dust next to a jeweled sweatshirt for which I paid way too much to look like a casual chandelier. I admit it: sometimes I fall into “The Trend Trap.” It can happen to the best of us — no one is immune. [pullquote]My cashmere coat and I are happy to invite a $25 sweater from H&M to come play for a season.[/pullquote] I’ve identified “The Trend Trap” as a five-part cycle that strikes when you least expect it. Feel free to throw in an “Amen” from the choir loft if any of the following speak to you:   1. You’re vulnerable: One day, for whatever reason, you’re …

What’s With the Damned Scarves?

I am not a fan of winter. Frankly, I’m not a fan of seasons in general. You know those people who “love the seasons!” Those who enjoy the temperature variations, the brisk autumn days, snuggling by the fire in winter, the beautiful blooms of spring. That ain’t me. I like it when it’s warm, period. Ok, I do love boots and sweaters, but only as a necessity for weathering the anti-summer. I do have many beautiful pairs of suede and heavy leather boots that sit and wait for those times of year I have to tolerate the cold. Perhaps I should start wearing them in the summer. Right? I mean, I do love boots, so why not wear them when my spirits are high, the sunshine is overhead, and I can actually come out of the house long enough for people to see and envy them. Hell, no. Which is why I take issue with people who wear scarves in the summer — a phenomenon that appears to be happening more and more. And it’s not just women in bulky …

Anti-Fads: 13 Women Share the Style They Won’t Retire

We all have that one piece of clothing that has stuck with us despite changing styles and tastes. For me it’s pointy cowboy boots, simply because they look and feel good, in a flashy-dusty Tanya Tucker meets Lucinda Williams kind of way. Yeehaw. So we asked our contributors and friends to tell us the one piece of clothing or beauty item that they will never let go of — or, something they brought back to life — and why. Interestingly, there were a few people who can’t let go of the very same things. Big Hoop Earrings I’ve been wearing big hoop earrings since the ’70’s and am grateful they’re back in style. They’re back in style, right? — Wendy Goldman Scherer Pencil Skirts I never throw them out. They are the Phoenix of the fashion world, always coming back, always red hot. — Cat Weaver A Black Cardigan There is nothing more indispensable to an office dweller than a trusty black cardigan. They never go out of style and they never lose their utility.  — …

The History of My Hair: A Timeline

Hair has always been the proving ground to see where you fit in, while trying your best to look good. As I cycled through my past hair trends, I realized I was casting out and reeling back the parts that worked — and the ones that didn’t. I went through a few bad cuts, got blonder and curlier than I meant to be, but eventually figured it out. Whatever quality it was that made me want to change my haircut every year is as much a part of me as anything else.

9 Things You Must Know to Thrift Like a Pro

Ever since I was little, I have been singularly obsessed with Other People’s Clothes. I say this as a proper noun because, well, it’s a proper little obsession. I love new clothes too, but there’s nothing that makes me happier than buying something that’s already been broken in. This, of course, makes my mother practically apoplectic. She grew up in poverty, was adamant that I have brand-new clothes for every occasion so that I looked crisp and clean. My unrequited love for vintage and thrift was confounding and concerning for her. I can see her plight: a single mother working multiple jobs to give her child the things she never had, and yet the child insists on second-hand everything as the main source of her wardrobe. It’s nothing personal, Mom. I just prefer that lived-in look. My love for these items took on a life of its own in college, where I discovered the joy of “borrowing” my boyfriends’ items of clothing. I pilfered college sweatshirts and created quite the stash of broken-in denim; I’ve …

Day in the Life of a Brooklyn Stoop Sale

A few weekends ago I stooped to conquer… the clutter in my home, that is. It almost didn’t happen. Our Brooklyn co-op’s summer stoop sale was scheduled for Saturday, aligning with our basement clean-up, so that we could really get rid of some crap. We placed an ad on Craigslist. We created an event on Facebook. We made flyers. We boxed up our unwanted junk. There’s nothing like a stoop sale to force you to go through every inch of your home, dividing and pricing your life’s accumulations into: 1. A few rare, ‘80s new wave albums that, unless someone gives me $100 for them, are heading back into my collection. You never know, I still might listen. 2. A printer that still kind of works. Someone might want it for $30. 3. Dresses, shirts and shoes. $1 each. No problem. 4. Old baking pans. If someone can haul these away, my karmic load will lift and I will be able to live life unencumbered. 5. Trash. I was hoping to get rid of said stuff …

I Wore a Bikini. That’s What I Did.

“It took me a long time not to judge myself through someone else’s eyes.” – Sally Field Do you watch Girls? If so, do you remember the episode where the girls of Girls head to the North Fork for some R&R and Hannah spends the entire day in that green bikini? I have watched that episode from start to finish 19 times. It was around the 11th viewing when my friend Ali posted to Facebook: “I cannot stop thinking of Hannah’s green bikini”. I popped up out of my constant recline (What? Whenever I’m home I lose all ability to sit up straight) and said “YES” which deserved all caps.  I realized that I had to watch that episode over and over, not because of the writing or the storyline or empathy on the progression/regression of friendship as an adult, but because homegirl wore a green bikini for an entire episode. Never mind my questions on comfort and chafing, but a woman who is not a size two rocked that bikini all over Long Island and I wanted to …

Why My Cleavage is My Ultimate Accessory

In high school, my friend Steve nicknamed me “Cleavage.” Or, more accurately, “CLEEE-VAGE,” which he shouted down the hallway or across the cafeteria in his deep, booming voice. Sometimes he’d try to throw French fries into said crevice, which wasn’t hard to do as I often sported outfits that put my boobs on display. Over 20 years later, not much has changed, except that Steve and I have lost touch, nobody else has picked up the nickname, and I’ve gotten better at shopping for pushup bras. I still love to show off my cleavage any chance I get, meaning just about every day. Now, I should clarify: I’m not talking about a Kim Kardashian or even Christina Hendricks amount of cleavage — i.e., when a woman’s boobs are the only thing you see because they are totally front and center. Rather, I go for a less over-the-top look. It’s not about smushing my breasts together as much as it is about gently suggesting what the rest — what you can’t see — might look like. …

A Shop for Pop — Our Special Boutique on GREAT.LY

TueNight has a boutique! As we announced a few weeks ago, we now have a shop on GREAT.LY. It’s chock full of original style, substance, baubles, kid stuff and the quirky goods you’d expect from us — all by our own curated “makers” who handcraft goods from all over the world. This week, we’re debuting a “Shop for Pop” to help you find a groovy item, perfect for Dad. By shopping TueNight on GREAT.LY, you’re also helping to support this site — we make about $30 month on that ad you see to the left, and that sure isn’t enough to support us. If you love the content you read on TueNight and want to help us make it better — share the site, tell your friends and do a little shopping. Here are a few of the goodies in stock: Retromarine Stylish Parrots Swim Shorts, $70 Mad Men Offices Floor Plan — Handrawn Fantasy Floorplans by Brandi Roberts    John Rousseau Solid Walnut Chopping Block with Maple Ends, $250   Aster & Bay Grooming Oil with …

Borrowed From the Boys: Me in My Dad’s Jacket

The photo above was taken of me when I was about four or five. My mom and dad were getting ready to go out for the night, and I wanted in on the action. Which is when I threw my dad’s jacket on over my housecoat and announced that I was coming with them. If I remember correctly, I also had my mother’s silver silk pumps on at this time, but you can’t see them in the photo. This makes sense because I was always trying to walk around the house in my mother’s shoes. The desire to wear men’s jackets stuck with me at that point. I’m always buying men’s jackets and blazers and having them tailored to fit me. As a curvy, duck-billed platypus version of both my parents (I have my paternal side’s hourglass torso with a long waist, I have the maternal side’s long, lean limbs), buying women’s blazers right off the rack is really hard for me. Which is why you always see me at thrift stores, nabbing men’s jackets …

Announcing a Partnership with GREAT.LY — And Some Pretty Great Stuff

Here at TueNight, in addition to sharing great stories, we also love beautiful STUFF. It must be said. Pocketbooks, posters, bangles, baubles, hey, even a Brontosaurus. With that said, we are thrilled to be a part of a fabulous new online marketplace called GREAT.LY, which brings together makers of unique, handmade stuff and tastemakers who like their stuff. On GREAT.LY, we have our own special online boutique called “We Dig” — which is filled with our hand-picked, favorite Great.ly goods. Other tastemakers include Heather Armstrong of Dooce, Kelly Beall of Design Crush, Holly Becker of Decor8, Cool Mom Picks, Rachel Faucett of Handmade Charlotte and many more. The makers and products are high-quality and affordable — we’ve stocked our boutique with stuff for kids, stuff we want to wear and stuff that’s plain quirky. Like we said, STUFF! And yes, if you buy something that we’ve recommended, we make a little money. Hooray! Capitalism! And, in a way, you’re helping to fund this site by buying something we recommend. So, good on ya. We’ll be looking for …

7 Essential Beauty Tips I Learned From My Mother

My mom is a common-sense kind of woman, someone who doesn’t delight in ceremony and abhors anything fussy. Which is why having a teenaged daughter who was obsessed with makeup and fashion was a bit of a quandary for her. I wanted to look magazine-cover ready at all times. But over the years, I’ve fallen into a a much more mellow beauty routine that’s quite similar to the one my mother has practiced for years. Want to love the skin you’re in and look like you sleep in an oxygen chamber? Heed the following seven simple tips from my beloved mother. 1. “The less you do to your face, the less you’ll have to do to your face.” This is her number one rule; simple, plain and effective. The more you scrub and paint and spackle and pull, the more scrubbing, painting, spackling and pulling you’ll have to do. Less is more, which means the easier you are on your skin, the less irritated it will become. It’s never too late to adopt this concept. …

Workout Style That Doesn’t Scream “Hey, I’m Working Out!”

We know. There are plenty of cool sports clothes, accessories and gear out there to make you look cute while working out (slimming yoga pants, sexy sports bras, killer running shoes, etc). Gone are the days when uncomfortable leotards and clingy tights were the only options to exercise in. So yes, we are quite blessed. But no matter how sporty-chic these items may be — and even if they’re made by the most high-end and hip of sportswear brands — they all still obviously say: “I’m on my way to exercise!” The following five sportswear items, on the other hand, can be worn as regular pieces of clothing. No one will know that you’re on your way to a work out, and some of them are so cute, you might just want to add them to your regular wardrobe. Biking in Style Riding your bike in a skirt? No way. But yes, way—Iva Jean has made it possible with their Reveal Skirt, $160, which is anything but revealing. The straight, tailored skirt is designed with …

The Beauty We Forgot to Pass Down to Our Daughters

While I didn’t always notice it — especially during my ridiculously self-centered teenage years — my mother was quite a striking woman. Mom was what some call “Black Irish,” — dark, wavy hair, brown eyes and a slightly olive complexion. She was medium height — maybe 5’7″? — with beautiful hands, gorgeous “gams” and slender fingers. She carried herself in a way that was almost lyrical. And that smile. You knew she liked you, if not loved you, when you saw that lovely smile. It made you feel good all over. That was what we saw. But then there was what she saw. I remember the phrases she’d utter for each stage of her life: As a child she was: Too skinny… embarrassingly skinny. Tiny boobs. Shapeless legs. Hip bones sticking out. As an adult she was: too heavy. Too heavy to even want to shop for clothes. (She was a size 14 at her largest, I think — what most call “normal” now.) Mom criticized her body constantly in front of me. I’m too big …

Pretty, Unmade-Up You: 17 Women Take It Off

There’s been much ado about whether we should or shouldn’t wear makeup, and what meaning that decision holds. So we asked our beautiful contributors and colleagues to snap photos of themselves fresh-faced and share their own points of view on how much, how little and when and why they make themselves up.   Teresa Misagal, 46, Photographer and Founder of Dailola Granola “You can totally change how you look with just a little lipstick. And I always wear lip color, especially something deep and dark, preferably with good moisture. When you reach a certain age — or any age for that matter — less is more. Cover up and powder, when it’s used beyond blotting, will make one look more aged. The more natural, the better. Men don’t like a mask — they wanna know what they’re getting into.”   Kim O’Donnel, 47, Cookbook Author “For all of my adult life, lipstick has been my one and only makeup mainstay.  Foundation, blush and all the other doo-dads have remained the stuff of mystery, like a language I’m curious to …

Could You Go Without Wearing Makeup For a Week? A Day?

A friend of mine was horrified by the Today show and their “No Makeup Monday.” So much so that she texted me regarding her outrage. “They looked downright scary. People need makeup. And as we get older, we absolutely need makeup.” “I disagree,” I texted back, a bit annoyed. “Society has conditioned us to believe that. And there is such a huge double standard. “ “Double standard? Matt Lauer looked like shit too! All I’m saying is would it kill people to run a brush through their hair and slap on some lip gloss?” “Not wearing makeup some days is liberating.” “Liberating?” said my friend. “I say yuck and lazy.” And so goes the dialogue we have with our friends and with ourselves. It’s painful and anything but pretty. Do I wear makeup? Do I look like shit without it? Do I look beautiful in my 40s? Do I need more makeup to cover up these damn wrinkles, no-sleep circles and darkening age spots? WAIT, before we continue, let’s caveat all of this to say …

How Can I Find That Discontinued Beauty Product?

Welcome to of our advice column where we try to answer all of your confounding “What The…?” questions. We’ll be getting advice from experts, but we may not always have the best answer. Feel free to share your own advice in the comments below. [dropcap]Q: [/dropcap] I’m beyond devastated. My favorite foundation ever — Chanel Pro Lumiere Professional Finish Makeup — has been discontinued. DISCONTINUED! I’m literally in shock. I’ve seen it online and know I can take a chance and get it on eBay or Amazon, but I’m not really one to go rogue for a makeup product. How will I know it’s the real thing? So my question is, what do you do when a product you love is discontinued? I LOVED this foundation — it was the perfect color and texture for my skin. Is there a way to find discontinued products from legit sources? If not, do you have any tips for finding a new foundation that is similar to my beloved Chanel? Any help you can offer would make me — …

Broken Cinderella: Is Imperfection the Key to True Beauty?

  I’m sure most people have experienced grade school “Show and Tell,” when you bring something special to class and talk about it. For this activity, my Cinderella figurine was a no-brainer. She was gorgeous and I cherished her in all her porcelain magnificence. Six inches tall, she arrived in a satin-lined lavender box on my eighth birthday, along with a delicate wristwatch, designed for a young girl’s delicate wrist. It had a pale pink leather strap, white face, silver numerals…at that moment in my eyes, the House of Chanel had nothing on the world of Disney watches. On the appointed “Show and Tell” day, I strapped on the watch and packed Cinderella in her hinged case for the walk to school. I held her gingerly, nodding with gravitas to the crossing guard who knew, I was sure, that I was carrying something spectacular. As I walked, I anticipated unveiling this creature before my classmates and hearing them ooh and aah as I did each time I spied her in the regal perch she’d assumed …

Yes, You Should Go Short. Here’s Why.

“Oh, I wish I could do that.” Hundreds of times I’ve heard this lament directed my way. Why? Is it because I can solve a Rubik’s Cube while holding it behind my back? Speak in numerous near-extinct tribal languages and dialects? Bend my thumb all the way back so it touches my wrist? Nope. It’s because I have short hair. Setting aside the obvious (oh, but you can do that — just let me get these massive shears out of my handbag…), I’m constantly amazed not so much by the fact that women envy short hair, but that they actually believe it’s somehow a hair style that’s totally beyond their reach. “You should cut it,” I urge them. “It would look great on you!” “Oh no, I could never pull it off,” they always reply. Pull it off? For the record, let’s create a short, but entirely comprehensive, list of reasons one could not “pull off” short hair: 1. You are Samson. 2. You have a wildly offensive neck tattoo. 3. You suffer from a goiter the size …

Losing It: On the Life, Death and Rebirth of My Hair

If the gods were whirling around looking for a luxurious head of hair worthy of chronicling, if they were going to point a finger down from Mount Olympus and boom out, “You! Tell the other mortals the story of your mane and sing of it,” it’s safe to say I would not be a contender. My hair is ordinary, even a little pitiful. But for all its lack of glamour, my hair has lived and struggled, and lo, gods, whether you like it or not, I will sing of it. Ages 0-7: My hair and I are at peace. Unless a hairbrush is coming close enough to attack, I never think about it. Age 7: Allison Pykett gets a Dorothy Hamill haircut. Dorothy Hamill is an Olympic figure skater whose hair is cut in a famous short wedge, and Allison is my best friend. Allison’s hair is thick, blond and luxurious, just the right texture to create that wedge. When Allison walks into Mrs. Langbein’s class with her new do, Mrs. Langbein leads the class …

Confessions of a Reluctant Weaver

While I am sure that Samson had many other things going for him besides his strength and luscious locks, he kind of lost it without his hair. I wrote the following post a few years ago when I lost some of my hair and I kind of lost it as well. After a long tearful adventure that involved bad hair days, a weave (never again!), and a cut, it’s grown back healthy and strong, but that is now, and this was then. What follows is a cautionary tale: I had contemplated a hair weave for a hot second back in the ’80s when so many of us lusted after Lisa Bonet’s flowing curls. But I quickly realized that I couldn’t be bothered and never gave it another thought. That is, until recently. About a year ago, when the grays started to taunt me a little too much, I thought, instead of just covering them up, why not get a little color too? I have always played it so safe with my hair, so it was …

Finding My Perfect Pink

When I was 11 years old, I was standing in line at the mall when two girls in their 20s began oohing and aahing over my hair. “Those streaks are so foxy!” said one, while the other lifted my hair and began holding it up to the light. “Where did you get it done?” she asked. Well, I’d gotten it done at the pool in my apartment complex by the New Mexico sunshine. I remember feeling oddly powerful in that moment: I was just a kid, and these women coveted my hair — my normally very brown, very boring, not-quite-curly-but-not-quite-straight hair. The next week I bought a bottle of Sun-In with my babysitting money, and thus began my 35-year love affair with dyeing my hair. I lived in Michigan during high school, was poor as dirt and had all the wrong clothes. I combated this by becoming one of the lone punk rockers at my high school; I bought men’s t-shirts, hand painted them and then cut them up so badly I had to safety …

My White Stripe — Going Halfway Gray

“Is that natural?” When something in your appearance is askew (to them), people have no qualms about stopping you in the street, waving a finger and asking you to decode your own being. Frankly, when it comes to my hair, I kinda dig it. “Well, you see,” I inform them, “the front part is natural, actually, but I dye the back part, but funny story there…” At which point I see their eyes glaze over and realize they’re sorry they asked. * I’ve always been a fan of my own hair — since Mom clipped a lock of it and put it in an envelope. I’ve been lucky to have hair that is fine but thick, straight and malleable, with a very slight, slip of a curve. When I look or feel crappy, my hair has the ability to be flamboyant and seductive, charming and witty. Swooping like a fancy cape around my face, my hair can easily disguise any bad day. But that doesn’t mean I’m not willing to futz with it. As a kid, …

Gray #2: Embracing My Roots

All the women in my office dye their hair. Nay, all the women in my profession (university development, aka fundraising) dye their hair. We aren’t investment bankers, but we are not terribly different culturally. Being a professional means fading into the background enough to highlight the seriousness of our purpose. Standing out with grey hair, though biologically normal for my age (46) is not culturally normal anymore. Everyone dyes. Sometimes it seems like we’re not allowed to go gray anymore. I’m seized with the fear that I’m the equivalent of John Travolta at the Oscars — befuddled by names, clinging to my fading youth, dyeing my hair too dark and becoming the butt of office jokes. I’d rather go willingly than try to pretend. I’m not sure what “aging gracefully” means exactly but it seems like the opposite of John Travolta. For years, I’ve been beating around the bush with my hair stylist, Vanessa, tentatively questioning her about what it would be like to go gray. “As I get older, will I look silly if I keep dyeing my hair this dark brown …

Gray #3: Going Gray, All The Way

At the age of 47, after coloring my hair consistently for more than a dozen years (and by then needing to do it every three weeks), I decided to stop. This was in some ways precipitated by a move to live full-time at my weekend home in the Catskills. I still make weekly trips into the city to meet with clients and see friends, but my life was evolving and the amount of time I had to sit in a colorists’ chair was limited. Here are a few things that made it hard to go through with this change: 1. Not knowing a single person my age with gray hair. 2. Fearing that it would have an impact on my work. (I’m a creative consultant to brands, many of them in the world of fashion and beauty.) 3. Extreme vanity. And here are a couple of things that made it easier: 1. My incredibly supportive husband, who insists I am always beautiful to him. 2. My colorist, who urged me to stick to the plan …