All posts tagged: Aged

In Defense of Dark Lipstick (And Other Apparent Mid-Life No-Nos)

I stumbled across an article this morning that said women in their 40s shouldn’t wear dark or dramatic lipstick because the color can get trapped in fine lines around the lips, making them look older. I felt a flare of rebellion at the idea. In fact, right now I am wearing a deep burgundy lip stain because, well, that’ll show ‘em. Yet I chose the lip color I’m wearing because it’s a lip stain rather than a lipstick, and is therefore far less likely to bleed into those little cracks that I do, indeed, now have around my mouth.. I found myself looking online for tips to prevent my lipstick from bleeding (which is apparently a rather complicated process involving foundation and cotton swabs dipped in powder), because I don’t want to highlight my age with a bad makeup choice. It’s a delicate balance for a woman of a certain age. I don’t care how many charming articles I see declaring that “40 is the new 30.” It’s bullshit. For me, 45 isn’t graceful midlife. …

Growing Up in Africa, I Couldn’t Wait to Get Old

The author in Rome (Photo credit: Melissa Myambo) Like many New Yorkers, I am grateful to the city planners who had the foresight to create such a phenomenal public transit system in the early 1900s. Growing up in Zimbabwe, a “Third World” country — to use an un-PC but strangely resonant term — I used to have to wait for a bus to take me to town for anywhere from three hours on a very bad day to at least 45 minutes on a good day. Or I’d have to catch a ramshackle skorokoro “emergency taxi.” Luckily for me, my family owned a car, so taking the bus was not an everyday necessity. The problem: I was one of the lucky few. New York, on the contrary, is a democratic city. As a result,  democratic buses and subways vein the whole area, carrying passengers to pretty much any of the five boroughs fairly easily, night or day. Often it only takes four minutes for a train to arrive and allow me to step through the …

What Stories Will Hannah Tell When She’s 45?

Someday I’ll stop quoting Lena Dunham. Or not. She’s so quotable. At lunch today, walking away from a bit of writer’s block, I watched the latest, DVR-ed episode of Girls (working from home on a snow day has its perks). OK, and the de rigueur PSST — SPOILER ALERT! It appears that Lena as Hannah has lost the rights to her book deal, for various reasons I won’t go into here. “My whole life was in that book, everything that’s ever happened to me. Now what am I going to do? Live another 25 years just to create a body of work that matches the body of work they stole from me? What if nothing happens in the next 25 years? What if I’m still living in this apartment?” It may sound silly, but sitting here, I’m feeling like she’s not entirely wrong. There’s something about writing in your 20s, absorbing every experience with buzzy innocence and awe, that gets harder to come by in your 40s. Things start to narrow, your path becomes more singular and rote. Morning coffee commute work twitter commute dinner die, repeat. Yes, …

You Should Know: How to Buy Better Leather

In “You Should Know” we tackle the stuff you think you probably should know at this point (but probably don’t). There was a day, before I started working in the world of design accessories, when I looked down at my “Genuine Leather” handbag and noticed that it just didn’t look like a hers. That classy lady who sat across from me on the N train had a bag that looked relaxed but kept its shape, a handle that looked firm but soft, and a charismatic patina that attested to years of service. Mine looked like a lump of dimpled plastic, honestly! What made the difference? Fine leather represents an investment that should reward the wearer with years of great first impressions. Yet with so many gussied up fakes competing for our attention, and tags that say “Genuine Leather” sewn into veritable road kill, how can one choose leather that looks beautiful and ages with character? Having worked as technical designer for companies like Coach and Baby Phat, I can now help you answer that question. Use …

Movie Night: Four Well-Aged Films and One Young Whippersnapper

In which we explore the filmic concerns of a given theme, and find new and novel ways of putting together yet another Internet-based list of movies. The wrinkle here, is our fifth pick will actually serve to prove as the counter argument, the best representation of the direct opposite of our theme.  1. Amour (2012) Director: Michael Haneke Essential Characters: Georges (Jean-Louis Trintignant), Anne (Emmanuelle Riva) Gist: An elderly husband lovingly cares for his wife after a stroke leaves her increasingly deranged and enfeebled, and leaves him largely alone. Generational Conflict: The couple have a daughter, but — in a terribly French manner — largely ignore her in order to better concentrate upon themselves. As a result, Georges refuses to lean on her for support when his wife turns ill. Important Life Lesson: True love can extend throughout any circumstance, no matter how grievous. Also, enjoy your time with your partner as much as you can while you have it, as you never know when it might be stripped away from you.   2. Harold and Maude (1971) Director: Hal …

Remembering Philip Seymour Hoffman

Margit meeting Philip Seymour Hoffman in 2000. “This was a chance, fleeting meeting in Philadelphia. He was in town shooting a film. What I love about this photo is you can see his generosity of spirit. He didn’t know me from Adam, but he was still happy to shake this fan’s hand and have a quick chat.” I met Philip Seymour Hoffman in 2007, at an after party for one of his films. He was the nicest, most gentle man I met that evening. I told him I loved his performance in 25th Hour, and he gave me the warmest “thank you” accompanied by an enormous smile. I felt blessed that I was able to tell an extraordinary actor how extraordinary I thought he was. And that he appreciated what I shared with him. At that time, from what I have researched and know via (reliable) word of mouth, he had been sober for around 18 years. “I got sober when I was 22 years old,” Hoffman told 60 Minutes in 2006. “You get panicked … …

Margit’s Note: Aged

(Photo Courtesy of Kristin Perers, www.thisis50.me) This week we’re talking about the word AGED. Not necessarily as in “aged and infirm” (well, the knees are creaky) but the idea of improved with time — yes, Orson Welles, like a fine wine, great cheese, soft leather, our “experienced” brains. I stumbled over an amazing blog this week, This is 50. Blogger Kristin Perers shoots the most sumptuous photos of women in their 50s, living life to the hilt. This picture of the woman standing in just a robe on an old car pretty much summed it up for me. Gorgeous. Check it out. This week: Cecilly Kellogg defends her hot red lipstick. Piers Marchant shares four well-aged films (and one whippersnapper). Melissa Myambo couldn’t wait to get old in Africa. Todd Coopee looks at 5 classic toys, then and now. We launch another installment of “You Should Know,” which is all about buying leather. Teresa gives us Dailola’s take in Dailola Weekly. And finally, Susan Linney remembers the actor Philip Seymour Hoffman. At 46, one, of the greatest actors of our time. Let’s …