All posts tagged: Analog

Help! I’ve Forgotten How to Say Thank You Without a Computer

Welcome to of our advice column where we try to answer all of your confounding “What The…?” questions. We’ll be getting advice from experts, but we may not always have the best answer. Feel free to share your own advice in the comments below. Q: I send so many emails, I’ve lost all ability to create a hand-written thank you note — and I forget the protocol. Can you give me the modern manners on the thank you note so I can properly thank Aunt Louise for the gravy boat she gave me last Thanksgiving? Signed, Thankless in Iowa City A: Ah, the thank you note. It’s either a charming throwback to a lost era of civility, or a guilt-inducing chore that has outlived its usefulness. But whether you love them or hate them, sooner or later you will have to write them. From birthday gifts to job interviews, there is a range of occasions for which thank you notes are appropriate. But while the reasons for writing them may vary, the guidelines for writing …

6 Amazing Analog Things My iPhone Has Replaced — And I Kinda Miss

While organizing the basement, I uncovered several old, beloved analog things that made me realize just how amazing our iPhones are, and how much has changed. Yet, there are some knobs and levers that still work better. Like all things in life, striking the balance of old and new technology is key. Now, to get those Super 8 films converted to digital… 1. Super 8 Camera. Our family Super 8 captured lots of fun moments as well as my brothers creative stop-action animation. And we never had to worry about recharging — we just wound up the motor. 2. Boombox. My boombox from the 1990s, complete with CD player! At the time, it was the slickest thing on the block. 3. Rabbit ear antenna. From way back in the analog days — even the TV could “go to eleven.” 4. Accordion.  I’m still desperately trying to learn how to play. Luckily, there’s an app for that. 5. A 45″ single. A song by Style 32 (my brother’s band) from 1982, entitled “She’s a Digital Girl But It’s an …

Your Weekend TueDo List: Books, Apps, Beauty and More

READ Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time. Author Brigid Schulte describes how between work, kids and home duties, her life is frantic and harried; anyone who feels “the overwhelm,” as Schulte calls it (women in particular) will understand exactly what she means. An award-winning journalist, Schulte throws herself into research and learns that women have never been expected to have leisure time — or if they do, it’s been assigned to moments like waiting in line, doing chores and holding on the phone. We love how she breaks down the structures that keep us from owning time for play and teaches us how to take our time back. ($19, Amazon.com) BUY Chantecaille Save the Bees Palette. This new eye and cheek palette — which features four on-trend spring shades — is a (decidedly un-digital) buy that you can feel good about. Five percent of proceeds will be donated to The Xerces Society, a non profit organization that helps protect invertebrates and their habitat, including those very important pollinators. The palette contains …

Why I’m in Love with a Luddite

The night I met my husband in the bar on 15th street, back in 2001, I was ready and eager to punch his phone number into whatever Palm Pilot-like object was trendy and in my bag. He wouldn’t give it to me. Instead, he wrote my first name on a napkin, slipped it in his pocket, and asked me to meet him, same time, same place, four days later. I did. He did. No texts, alerts or mobile carriers required. At the end of our first date I asked for his email address. Again, he declined. He said he didn’t want to get to know me on the computer, through grammatically sub-par notes sent during office breaks or business meetings. He wanted to get to know me, in real-time and in real life. This all seemed highly suspect. Who was this guy? Was he on the lam? Married? Why so cagey? I couldn’t get it into my head that his avoidance of technology might have motives based in anything but malice. But he was charming, …

Remotely Challenged: My Technological Struggle to Watch TV

(Graphic: Kat Borosky/TueNight) At the risk of irretrievably dating myself, I remember a time in my childhood home when we had to get up to change the channel. There were precisely six channels to choose from, so unless you were really unhappy with the program you were watching, you might just grin and bear Perry Mason or Hee Haw. Then, the most important innovation of the modern age found its way into my young hands: the TV remote, an absolute revelation in that it allowed you to cycle through your limited options…while laying on your ass! I cherished my remote as one would a puppy, keeping it groomed and fed (with big batteries), and protecting it from my older brother’s grimy hands as best I could. My pet was brown and surprisingly heavy and you had to aim well and push down hard on his buttons to make things happen, so even though you could stay put, you still needed to earn each channel change. I readily admit to be electronically challenged and blissfully ignorant …

Analog

Margit’s Note: The Analog Issue

“Why do you pet the glowing thing more than you pet me?” says my cat, as I swipe my iPhone. (Seriously, she tells me with her furrowed kitty brow.) Earlier this month, on the National Day of Unplugging, I spent 5 whole minutes wondering if I could embark on a digital detox. Let me text this to you: “Nope.”  As last week’s New Yorker piece “The Pointlessness of Unplugging” argued, “Few who unplug really want to surrender their citizenship in the land of technology; they simply want to travel outside it on temporary visas.” Because there is obvious benefit to our e-lives — from expedient access to data to the ability to order dinner without ever moving from this chair. And as Gen-X era women, we find ourselves betwixt and between the analog and the digital: we took a typewriter to college and maybe ended it — or started our first job — with an email account. We mix and match our lives — post-it reminders mingle with our favorite To Do app (mine is …

My Journals Knew I Was an Alcoholic Before I Did

(Photo Credit: Andy Kropa) For many years I wrote nightly in a journal, with a pen and a bound book of beautiful empty pages, which I filled fast and furiously before bed. Then one day, I stopped. As near as I can figure, this quitting occurred around the time Wifi came into my life and my apartment. Instead of bringing my journal into bed with me, I brought my laptop. And while I’m pretty sure I simply meant to shift my personal reflections to the digital writing device I was now using so often, clearly I was an analog-only journaler. It was in 2007 — ironically, the same year I started a Facebook account — that my 20-year journaling career came to a screeching halt. I realized this a few weeks ago, while organizing boxes in my stuffed-to-the-max storage unit. I found one filled with all of my old journals; writing that began in the 8th grade and went right through my 32nd birthday. There were more than 30 various notebooks in that box, of all different …

Four Lovably Lo-Fi Celebrations and One Tech-Savvy Refutation

In which we explore the filmic concerns of a given theme, and find new and novel ways of putting together yet another Internet-based list of movies. The wrinkle here, is our fifth pick will actually serve to prove as the counter argument, the best representation of the direct opposite of our theme. 1. Brazil (1985) Director: Terry Gilliam Gist: In a sad Orwellian future adrift in bureaucracy, Sam Lowry (Jonathan Pryce) gets mistaken for a terrorist rebel and is ensnared in a would-be rebellion, while finally meeting and trying to protect the beautiful woman (Kim Greist) of his dreams. Offensive Technology: The whole damn system is a giant, bureaucratic disaster, with endless offices and committees and piles of paperwork that just confuses everybody and leads to glaring inefficiency and ineptitude. To make matters worse, the technology of the future is always breaking down at the worst possible moments, and seems barely functional when it does operate. Counter Argument: Not much to be said here. The future in Terry Gilliam’s brilliantly realized satire is a very familiar …