All posts tagged: Oversharing

Tales of T.M.I.: When Does Oversharing Become Overbearing?

(Photo: Nancy Gonzalez/TueNight.com) T.M.I. Too much information. Ever shared more than you should? Ever gone out on a limb, to have no one join you there? You, too, could be a practitioner of T.M.I. You’re oversharing, of a very personal sort, to folks who may or may not want to hear it (but, let’s be honest, probably not). Like colleagues. Folks at church. Your not-well-curated social media networks. Unsure if you’ve ever done it? Let’s assess, via criteria I like to call “The 7 B’s”: Is it about bodily fluids? Is it regarding bedroom activity? Does it involve your boobs, your bump, your bum or your balls? And finally, not a B but an important question: Did you experience sharing regret — even a smidge? If yes, to any/all of these criteria, then you might be an oversharer. According to Urban Dictionary — esteemed and accurate source that it is — T.M.I. is, “information more personal than anyone wants, or needs, to know.” Word. Now, don’t get me wrong: There are some times when oversharing might …

Margit’s Note: Sharing is Caring

“Sharing is caring!” My college dorm neighbor used to say that all the time — usually with the goal of bumming a cigarette from my roommate. (Or a funny cigarette.) These days, we live in a world where “sharing” has taken on new meaning; tinged with concerns of privacy or projects for a collective benefit. On a daily, if not minute by minute basis, we share our favorite news stories, baby photos, cat videos, and bizarrely niche Buzzfeed quizzes (“Which Willy Wonka Character Are You?” — I am Violet Beauregarde, obvs.) But we’re also sharing resources to get a great deal — our cars, our clothes and our homes as hotels. As we share, are we communicating more effectively? Being good to our fellow humans? That’s the question this week as we tackle stories of sharing — and oversharing. Jody Jones asks when sharing becomes TMI I investigate the world of the sharing economy via Gwynnie Bee Katharine English learns to share with her husband — and tells you how you can too! Rebecca Fernandez offers the art of constructive criticism …

Why Poop Has No Place On Social Media

(Graphic: Kat Borosky/TueNight.com) When I started STFU Parents, a user-submission-based website highlighting “parental overshare,” I didn’t realize that I was signing up to look at so much shit. Literally. At the time, my definition of “oversharing” did include mannerly updates about potty training, but never in my wildest nightmares did I think parents would post pictures of their children’s actual fecal matter — or long-winded descriptions of said fecal matter — on Facebook. Having been aware of the explosion of “mommy blogs” at the time, I figured if you wanted to post about your child’s diarrhea, you’d probably do so on a personal blog rather than blast a digital telegram to your friends, relatives, neighbors, former teachers, and bosses. Boy, was I naive. I quickly discovered that many parents are delighted by their kids’ poop and think that all of their friends actually care. I filed away hundreds of these submissions in a folder titled “Bathroom Behavior,” and over time I began noticing bizarre patterns. I created sub-folders for various topics pertaining to children’s poop, such as …