All posts tagged: Prize

Barely Qualified: Notes From a First-Time Exotic Dance Judge

(Photo: Elena Gatti/Flickr.com) I never saw the Diamond G-String with my own eyes, and I’m not sure if it truly exists. As prizes go, among prizes for getting naked at least, this alleged jeweled garment has the draw and cachet of a netherworld tiara. Given every year by a club in Philadelphia — the kind where “gentlemen” appear in quotes alongside “dancers” — this win crowns one girl above the rest. Forget, for a second, any glass-beaded lingerie. Holding the title alone, she can up her earnings, command more. Bank on prime-time slots on stage, better placement in the floor rounds. Choose her as a winner, and you can change that stripper’s year. (An intervention that appeals to many of the kind of people who don’t actually frequent strip clubs.) I say all this only before you ask — so, what kind of connoisseur gets to award this prize? Who gets to determine what’s hot and coveted by strip-club goers for a whole 12 months? Well, one year, I did. * * * “What would …

The Ballsiest, Awkwardest and Cryingest: Our Own Sundance Awards

(Photos Clockwise: James White, The Hunting Ground, The Overnight, Me & Earl & the Dying Girl and Stockholm, Pennsylvania) Park City, Utah, stands about 6,900 feet over sea level. If you are used to, say, the 39 feet Philadelphia sits above the Atlantic, that’s a hell of a long way up. You feel this most walking from the outskirts of town — where the critics and press screenings are mostly ensconced — up the slight-but-treacherous-upgrade mile into the downtown area, where all the celebs, parties and nightlife take place. A couple of times I made this very trek while trying to talk on the phone and found myself unable to speak coherently for all the huffing and puffing I was doing. an apt metaphor for the distance between the Talent and the (digitally) ink-stained hoard that appraise them. Let’s not dwell on it. For this reason among a host of others, I pretty much kept it to the movies on this, my first visit to this annual American Indie showcase, and on that score, I wasn’t …

Why Do We Love The Things We Love?

As a boy, my son Peter collected seashells — most were found during morning walks along a variety of shorelines from Maine to Florida to Kauai; a few were purchased in souvenir shops; a very special few were ordered from seashell suppliers. Peter spent hours arranging his shells, sorting and displaying them with intense concentration and pride. These days (Peter is now a college senior), the bulk of his collection sits in a dusty box on the top shelf of his closet. But even though this hobby may have lost its appeal, I suspect Peter might always name his seashell collection among his prized possessions. Why do we love the things we love? For most people, the appeal of an object has little to do with its monetary value. Typically, we prize certain possessions because of some intangible quality that’s supremely personal. When a team of researchers from Arizona State University examined the motivation behind human attachment to possessions, they found that people form attachments when objects help narrate their life story. These lifeless “things” …

5 #Winning Reads

When people hear the words “prize” and “books” together, they usually think of “Pulitzer,” which makes sense given that literary awards are prestigious — not to mention a great way to winnow your reading lists. But there’s another side to the words “prize” and “books,” and that’s books about prizes. Many a plot revolves around winning something: A suitor’s eye, a coveted job, even a lawsuit. The following list involves books in which winning actually involves a prize of some kind. What a fitting reward one of these titles would be to read after a long day. The Submission by Amy Waldman Imagine what might have happened if they held a juried contest for a New York City 9/11 memorial — and the winner was a Muslim. That’s what Waldman (a former reporter for The New York Times and correspondent for The Atlantic) attempts in her 2011 debut novel about how one woman, widowed by the tragedy, stands up for an artist whose vision she believes to be the most truthful. A powerful and thought-provoking choice for your …

We Asked Our Readers About TueNight. Here’s What You Said

After a year and a half of publishing TueNight (from our offices, from home in pajamas, from far-flung spots as varied as Virginia and Ireland), we were curious to hear from you, our readers. We wanted to get in your heads a bit and hear what you’re thinking. What do you dig? What are you bored of? And how can you tell us this really great theme you’ve been waiting for us to pick? So we set up a very short questionnaire online and asked. (Only five questions? That’s like a speed date!) Nothing majorly soul-searching, just a gut check to make sure we’re having the right conversations. And we loved your responses — which we will now share. We can’t thank you enough for your time and your thoughts. Here are our questions and your answers. 1. What themes should TueNight.com do next? It was very interesting to see that lots of you want to talk about relationships: specifically, reconnecting with spouses, dating after divorce, dealing with kids in college, being the non-mom around …

Margit’s Note: And You Get a Car! And You Get a Car!

In this day and age when everyone gets a trophy (except the Seahawks…. but maybe the dancing shark actually won), we remember a time when there were true winners and losers. You won the yellow ribbon in ice skating; you lost the blueberry pie competition. Why do salt and sugar have to look so much alike… We clutched our shiny trophy for one smug moment, then stuck it in a cardboard box next to our yearbooks and a one-time, treasured Homies collection. This week we resurface our prizes — the ones as random as a Cracker Jack charm and the ones as well-deserved (or as DuVernay-ily disappointing) as an Oscar. Juliet Fletcher judges an exotic dance contest in Philly. Bethanne Patrick gives us five blue-ribbon reads. Amy Barr asks why we cherish certain collections. Our man in Utah, Piers Marchant, doles out his own Sundance trophies. And Diane Otter revels in a kickball glory. We also share the results of our very first (very casual) survey. And we’re pleased to report, you like us, you really, really like …