All posts tagged: Share

The Etiquette of Social Media Sharing (i.e. How Not to Be a Content-Stealing Jerk)

(Graphic: Kat Borosky/TueNight) These days, we live to share. With the click of a button we’re instantly sharing posts, tweets, photos, videos and screenshots. But often when we share, we’re not following good social media etiquette. For example, some platforms (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) enable us to easily credit the originator of the content we’re sharing; others not so much. As a result — and often unintentionally — proper attribution of the shared content becomes entirely lost or worse, incorrectly ascribed. I’ve seen some cases where people intentionally pass other people’s work off as their own, and other cases where a sharer doesn’t mean to steal, but just doesn’t know how to properly credit the content. So instead, he or she does nothing. There are a few simple things you can do when sharing other people’s content that not only will show you’re practicing good #SMEtiquette, but will endear you to the people whose content you’re sharing. All it takes is a little extra time and attention. And if you give credit where credit’s due, you …

There’s A Special Place in Hell For Women Who “Hate” Other Women

(Photo: Bernard Kobel / Courtesy: Etsy) A friend of mine recently linked to an article and added an emphatic notation of “Yes!” The article was called “Recline, Don’t ‘Lean In’ (Why I Hate Sheryl Sandberg)” and I have to be honest with you — I haven’t been this disappointed in some time. As women, we struggle every day to find our paths, to find a route that will lead us to success while still allowing us to still be present in our own lives. That path is often littered with land mines, debris and many other enormous and exhausting obstacles. That’s why taking time out of your day to publicly “hate” a person for doing something — ANYTHING — to help other women who are navigating the murky waters of work/life balance is so audacious, so counterproductive, and frankly, so very petty. Rosa Brooks’ “problem” with Sandberg is that after reading Lean In, she felt she needed to do more in the workplace, so she increased her responsibilities, worked longer hours and ultimately sacrificed her …

On Becoming a Writer Who Writes

(Photo of and by: Amy Barr) Until about a month ago, I was a writer who didn’t write. That may seem like a strange admission from someone who has made her living as a writer for the past 25 years, but it’s true in a fundamental way. Yes, I’ve edited thousands of articles and written a couple of hundred during my years at Time Inc., Worth and Working Mother magazines. I’ve created pages upon pages of content for dozens of websites and written countless pieces of marketing materials over the past couple of decades. But until recently, I never shared a real piece of myself with a reader. I rarely wrote about things that moved me at my core and even when I did, in my head, there was too much at stake to share those personal reflections. There are many, many writers in the writers-who-don’t-write club (you know who you are), some with a modicum of talent, some with an extraordinary amount. Whatever our skill level, we may as well have zero aptitude and …

11 Things My Husband Taught Me About Sharing

Annette and Dave, another happy couple sharing the secret of sharing the dregs. (Photo Credit: Kat Borosky) It took me almost two years to say “we” instead of “I” after I got married. It wasn’t that I didn’t think of myself as part of a couple; it was that I’d been single for so long, living blissfully in bachelorette apartments and eating whatever I wanted whenever I wanted, listening to whatever music I fancied, going out whenever I pleased, and decorating with a personal flair that took no one else’s tastes into consideration. I had no concept of “share.” Worse, I’d been an only child. I’d had no siblings vying for scarce resources. My parents only had to clothe, feed and educate one ankle biter. That is, until I was 13, and my brother came along, much to my horror. I found that the full-on attention and cooing I’d been accustomed to my entire life was now diluted by an interloper. Still, I was about to enter high school, and the arrival of this caboose …

Four Very Giving Films and One Stingy Bastard

In which we explore the filmic concerns of a given theme, and find new and novel ways of putting together yet another Internet-based list of movies. The wrinkle here, is our fifth pick will actually serve to prove as the counter argument, the best representation of the direct opposite of our theme. 1. Adore (2013) Director: Anne Fontaine Gist: Two beautiful women who have been friends all their lives (Naomi Watts and Robin Wright), fall for each other’s sons (Xavier Samuel and James Frecheville) over the course of a single, tumultuous summer. Shared Benevolence: That would be the sons Ian (Samuel) and Tom (Frecheville). Simultaneously aghast and compelled, Lil (Watts) and Roz (Wright) cross social and moral boundaries in pursuit of their hearts’ desires, hanging the potential damage it could wreck to their friendship and the world around the boys. End Result: As you can imagine, things don’t go terribly well with this scenario. By the end, petty jealousies end up more or less blowing up everyone’s lives, and no one really gets what he/she might …