All posts tagged: Travel

Top 5 Ways to Survive Sickness While Traveling

If I could give you advice, it would be to travel as often as you can. Traveling and living in multiple cities has always been a life goal of mine. Some years, chasing that goal entails multi-country tours. Others, it means staying in one place to soak up much of the local atmosphere as I can. From summer internships in Spain, business trips in Latin America, living in France while pregnant, and educational sojourns to Asia, I have learned much about the art and adaptability of travel from my journeys. Such experiential education becomes even more important to apply when you become ill while traveling. I don’t mean the headache or hangover type of ill. I mean the I-want-to-be-in-my-bed-with-my-doctor-and-mother-on-speed-dial type of ill. Now that I’m a parent, it’s even more important for me to be prepared prior to and during travel. Fortunately, I’ve learned a lot. Here are my top 5 tips for dealing with illness while on the road. 1.  Ask about special amenities for the sick. Airports sometimes have accelerated immigration for the …

The Trip and the Tribe That Changed My Life

A coworker of mine used to give me shit about my fondness for getting together with my “Hawaii girls,” a group of writers I met in the Aloha State. A mere week after our group parted ways, we were planning our first reunion. “Don’t you guys have friends of your own?” she asked. “Of course we do,” I replied. “We just really, really like each other.” Last June, bleary from a pre-dawn call-a-car ride to the airport and a turbulent connection from New York City to Atlanta, I plunked down in my seat on a massive jet for a nine-hour flight to Honolulu. The woman beside me looked strangely familiar. Had we met somewhere before? “You look like you might be on the Starwood trip,” she said. “I’m Kafi—I am, too!” Kafi is a fellow writer, and she and I were both headed west to check out Starwood Hawaii’s health and wellness programs. Nine hours is a long time to share an armrest, and by the time we touched down we’d told each other the stories …

Lesvos, Ayvalik, Istanbul, Astoria

(Graphic: Helen Jane Hearn/TueNight.com) In 2005, I was waitressing in New York City and thought, no, was convinced that I was destined for so much more. I called myself an opera singer/actor, but I wasn’t making a living at it. Many of my friends had far fancier, better educations than I did, better jobs, and, in most cases, more money. That is a reality of living in NYC, but I had only been here a couple of years and hadn’t fully accepted my place “in the middle” yet. I decided that the best way for me to become more equal with a friend whom I idolized for her intellect, creativity, and worldliness was to travel more, like she did. She was just starting to freelance for Lonely Planet and Rough Guides, and I shared her curiosity for other cultures and places, so it didn’t seem so crazy that I would make it a goal to just get on a plane and… GO. My friend (who I’ll call Z) and her then boyfriend, now husband (let’s call …

A Superstar Visits Buenos Aires

(Photo: Liverpool Lighthouse/YouTube.com) Gospel music has a way of making people sound like better singers than they are. I should know—I’m one of those people. In general, one should not make too many assumptions about someone’s talent simply because that person sings professionally or publicly. When a person chooses to sing or not sing in front of other people, that choice doesn’t necessarily reflect the person’s musical ability (or lack thereof). Not all people who can sing do sing, and not all people who do sing can sing. If you’re wondering into which category I fall, the answer is who the hell knows? Can I carry a tune? Absolutely. (*Clears throat. Puts right index finger to ear and points left index finger to sky, like Mi-mi-mi-miiiiii. Do-re-mi-fa….*) Can I hit high notes? Usually. It depends on how many Marlboros I smoked (or how much Malbec I drank) the previous night. But when you sing in a gospel choir, especially an African-American gospel choir, hitting your notes is beside the point. The music is as much …

Margit’s Note: New York Walkabout

A trip can be a journey to Singapore or it can be a jaunt around the block. Both can do wonders to change your perspective and open up your mind. Come to think of it, I’m having a bit of writer’s block, so let’s go outside. First, I head to the Starbucks across the street on Broadway to get my usual green iced tea but a sign on the door reads, “Due to an emergency, we’re closed,” with a note about other nearby locations. Huh, ok. Recalculating. I stand for a minute and watch other people’s reactions. They stop dead and look around, confused, as if they can’t quite believe their daily routine could dismantle and/or what the hell kind of emergency makes a Starbucks close. Moving along… I walk to another Chinatown coffee shop and along the way notice this cool Basquiat-Warhol poster — a throwback to an older, grittier downtown. Dodging women hawking knock-off “Louis Vuitton-Michael Kors-Marc Jacobs” bags, I watch tourists pull off to the side and hover over a map. I …

Why Bathing is the New Hotness

(Graphic: Helen Jane Hearn/TueNight.com) When we chatted on the phone today, my mother reported that, thanks to Governor Jerry Brown’s stipulation, she and other California residents must reduce their water consumption by 25%. She now feels guilty about even letting the water in her shower run until it’s warm enough to stand beneath (though she catches the cold water in a bucket and uses it to revive her drought-flattened garden). I chuckled in sympathy and offered to bring a suitcase full of New York City tap water when I visit her later this summer. Then I went for a jog and cooled down in my second shower of the day, at one in the afternoon. It’s possible that I’ll take another when I get home tonight, if I walk home in the rain and need warming up (a cold front is sweeping through the city this week). I also might take one if I have trouble falling asleep—it’s so much nicer to go to bed when my hair is wet and my skin is a …

10 Gifts for the World Traveler and the Day Tripper

Whether you’re shopping for a Wild-inspired backpacker or a globe-trotter who considers a two-star hotel “slumming it,” these gifts will work for just about any kind of traveler. And best of all, they might inspire you to book a last-minute flight and head off on your very own adventure. 1. Flight 001 Mondo Travel Alarm When you’re switching between time zones and still need to be sure you don’t miss that early morning wakeup call, this cute, lightweight alarm can help. It’s small — not even a full three inches across —so you can justify packing it, and just like your alarm at home, comes equipped with a snooze button. $25, flight001.com 2. Cath Kidston Mini Ticket Holder One major travel challenge is keeping all those pieces of paper together: boarding passes, train tickets, printed-out hotel confirmations and the like. This organizer is small, flat and easily stashes all your paperwork. Plus the London bus design gives it a sense of whimsy. $10, cathkidston.com 3. Trakdot Luggage Tracker We’ve all had that sense of panic …

Island for One, Please: Why I Love Traveling Solo

(Photo: Courtesy Courtney Colwell) Are you one of those people who say they could never work virtually because they’d miss being around other people? Not me.  When I tell, friends that, they look at me in bewilderment. “But if you were stranded on a deserted island…” and I cut them off with, “Wait, where is it?” I’ve been looking for that island for years. No, I don’t need to go 100% off the grid, and it’s not that I don’t like people. It’s just that sometimes I prefer solitude. I find travelling alone, even in a crowded city, can give me some sense of “alone.” About 10 years ago, I took my first solo trip — on my way to visit a friend in Hong Kong, I decided to go to China on my own. It was one of the best trips I’ve ever taken, but eventually, I forgot that part of what I had loved was being on my own. Then, a few years ago, a friend bailed on a trip to Prague about …

I Always Travel With My…

(Graphic: Kat Borosky/TueNight.com) When traveling, we all have that one thing we wouldn’t dare leave home without —a pashmina to keep us warm or earplugs to tune out Loud Baby. We asked our contributors for that one special thing… Baby Cashmere Blanket When my son was born, we received a gorgeous cashmere baby blanket from Susan Lazar, the designer, who is a childhood friend of mine. It is gray with his horoscope sign (Scorpio) in white. He no longer needs it — he is 10 now —  but it is the perfect blanket to use on an airplane. It is easy to stuff into a backpack, and it is cozy, soft, warm and luxe. —Lauren Young Moccasin Slippers I ALWAYS fly with my old Dearform moccasin slippers. Beige, furry and a hand-me-down from my mom circa 1982, these slippers are on my feet before the plane takes off. I’ve gotten some funny looks from other passengers but I don’t care. A few years ago, I lost my lucky slippers before a long haul to London, …

Dublin, Take Two: A Writer Revisits the Emerald Isle

(Photo: Courtesy The Shelbourne) The first time I took a whack at Dublin, I was working as an assistant in my first job after college. The second, I was an established travel writer “on holiday” with my then-boyfriend. There are some things that remained the same: the nippy weather, the reliable Guinness pours, the warm, amiable charm of the Irish people. But being able to go and do it “the proper way” this time — staying at a hotel instead of a six-to-a-bed mixed hostel room — gave me a whole new perspective on the city. Where to Stay The Shelbourne. It’s hard to get more central than St. Stephens Green, and this hotel wins not only for convenience but for cozy-yet-luxe accommodations. It was built in 1842, but the old-world charm melds nicely with modern conveniences. Paintings by local Irish artists hang in hallways and common areas and the spa is perfect when you need a warm sauna at the end of a cold day. Dylan Hotel. If it’s a more boutique-y feel you’re after, The Dylan …

The Slightly More Secret Side of Paris

Dali mural outside Centre Pompidou (Photo credit: Margit Detweiler) There is nothing better than walking around Paris, wherever your feet take you, stopping at cafés, either with your better half, in love, or by yourself, in love with the city. You’ve likely got a list of things you daydream about seeing or returning to. If you don’t, the guidebooks will send you to the Louvre for the Mona Lisa and the Raft of the Medusa, up la Tour Eiffel and down into the Catacombs, all wonderful and all places you should visit first. But here’s a slightly more secret list — the hidden Paris that you might have overlooked on your first visit. Visit Atelier Brancusi Constantin Brancusi’s studio, remounted in a purpose-built building designed by Renzo Piano, and hidden to the side of the plaza at the Centre Pompidou. Have lunch or tea at Ladurée in St. Germain de Prés This is the best location of a wonderful chain of patisseries. Ask to sit upstairs in the deep blue salon. Order a sandwich or salad …

7 Tips for the Perfect Trip to Kauai

Our summer home is on the north shore of Kauai. Ok, that’s not true. My husband and I don’t own a beach house. We don’t have plans to buy a beach house, Mega Millions windfall notwithstanding. We’ve never even stayed in Kauai for more than two consecutive weeks. But, through 5 visits in 10 years, Kauai has become our favorite place. Travel nirvana. We have mastered the art of “power decompressing” on this lush little dot in the Pacific and, truly, sometimes achingly, feel it’s a home away from home. If you’ve been to Kauai (probably on your honeymoon) you very likely: Stayed at the St. Regis Princeville resort, drank Green Flash cocktails on the Makana Terrace, got a couples massage. Spent at least one full day driving all over the island ticking off the requisite Must Do’s, including standing in the hour-long Ono-Char Burger line and sampling each of the island’s 15 most pristine beaches for approximately 10 minutes apiece. Went to a luau. Took lots of pictures with pretty scenery in the background. …

Margit’s Note: Hey, Let’s Take a Trip!

I’m hearing that Jonathan Richman song, “Let’s Take a Trip.” He rocks out, “I’ve got my jeans and things and I’m ready to go.” The idea of quickly packing up the essentials, hopping in the car, and meandering into the unknown. Can we leave, like now? Sure, most of us are travelling out of familial love and duty this time of year, but we can also plan and dream for a different trip sometime next year. A hut on Vanuatu. A corner of sand on Coney Island. I’m not picky. This week, in addition to serving up some brand-new stories, we’re highlighting several of our Second-Time Travel pieces, as well. You know, those places you may have been once? We track down the secret alleys and hidden gems to see the second time around. It’s an insider’s guide of sorts. (And if you’d like to write one of these for us, pitch us at hello@tuenight.com!) So let’s go go go… Lilit Marcus does the writer’s trip to Dublin. Courtney Colwell extols the virtues of solo travel. …

A Music Journalist’s Go-To Spots in London

View from the London Eye (Photo courtesy Michael Moskovitz) While known for its legendary performances, sticky floors and the place made famous by The Who poster, the Marquee Club will be forever remembered as the spot I met my UK BFF Katrina Kelly. We met in the graffiti’d dressing room after a show for a band we loved, Twenty Flight Rockers. Katrina was dating the guitarist Ian, while I was seeing the drummer, Mark. It was 1986, my summer abroad, and when I wasn’t in class or interning for Melody Maker, Katrina and I were inseparable. I was 19 and she was 22, and we were living on a stretched budget in the Kensington section of London. We lived for record release parties, gallery openings, guest lists, concerts and free drinks. We knew a ton of doormen, bartenders and musicians. Fast-forward 28 years and our tastes have matured and our wallets are a bit little fuller. Katrina and I still love being together in London, but we experience it with more sophistication. Since 2010, I’ve …

Matchbook Dad - Pop

Matchbook Dad: A Life of Lucky Strikes

So many matchbooks; a lifetime of memories. (Photo: Margit Detweiler/TueNight) When my parents downsized last year, moving into a smaller cottage house, my Dad handed me three giant plastic baggies of 200+ matches he’d collected over the years. “You can probably figure out something to do with these,” he said. And when I saw those matches, I saw stories — a lifetime of traveling, memories and moments. My Dad has been collecting matches since he was an eight-year-old kid in Hatfield, Pennsylvania. Becoming an Air Force captain in the ’60s, he traveled all over the world while he was stationed in Wiesbaden, Germany, and, later, as a water utilities executive  in the U.S. So, like many, he snatched up these free, end-of-the-meal souvenirs — here and abroad. “Everyone smoked back then so there were always matchbooks at the hotel checkout desk, in restaurants,” Dad says. “I started collecting them for no particular reason,” he pauses. “Well, looking back on it maybe sentimental reasons.” Each matchbook jogs a memory for my dad, like a physical diary entry …

Spending on Sunny Days: What My Mother’s Diagnosis Taught Me About Money

Growing up in Pittsburgh during the 1970s, I learned a few things: jobs can go away quickly, chronic unemployment can cause entire towns to wither, and the Steelers, unlike the industry they were named for, were invincible. During those years, steel mills closed one after another, but fortunately my family remained unaffected. My father worked for a nascent Allegheny Airlines, which became USAir, now US American Air (or whatever ultra-patriotic name they’ve now chosen to give it). Still, I remember the beginning of each school year when we’d go around the room and state our names, neighborhoods and other fun facts (like where your father worked). Sadly, the question was never where your mother worked; and for a couple of years, there weren’t many fathers working at all. Given that environment, I grew up with the understanding that money was a limited resource that should be saved, put away for retirement and rainy days. Like, Russell-Crowe-in-an-Ark rainy days.  My parents made it clear early on that my choices for college were to either get a …

5 Perfect Trips for Everyone on Your List

Here’s the truth: No one needs another sweater, scented candle, novel, or wireless speaker. (They probably haven’t used last year’s yet.) A vacation, on the other hand, is something everyone needs. A vacation that’s been planned for them is even better. Here’s where to send (or bring) everyone on your list. 1. The Mother and Daughter Trip Rome, Italy Rome is a classic. Yes, it’s spaghetti carbonara and gnocchi gorgonzola – heavy, old-fashioned, and delicious. But Rome is also incredibly vibrant and fresh right now, as seen in the new Maxxi Museum of 21st Century Arts and in new juice bars all over town. The old and new coexist harmoniously in Rome, which is a lesson for your intergenerational holiday. And if your mother complains that she feels old, remind her that Rome is almost 3,000 years old and looks pretty great. For ideas and details about historic sites and cool new shops, check out Fathom’s Guide to Rome. Where to Stay Splurge Hotel: J.K. Place Roma. A gorgeous new boutique hotel in the center of town. Affordable Hotel: Buonanotte Garibaldi. A tucked-away, three-room bed and breakfast in …

Going Solo: Spending My 38th Birthday Alone in Albuquerque

This Sunday, I’ll be turning 38. And I’ll be spending it in a city I’ve never visited: Albuquerque, New Mexico. I’ll be traveling by myself, and that’s exactly what I want for this birthday. It’s the first birthday where I won’t be getting a call or card from my grandmother, who passed away in January (though her card likely would have already arrived). It’s a birthday where the blaring biological clock warnings feel like they are all going off in my head at once. So I decided to escape to somewhere warm where I hope to recharge and replenish myself and find a way to make peace with this new age that feels scary for many reasons. “Is your boyfriend going with you?” several people have asked when I told them of my plans. He’s not. When a couple that we were having dinner with the other night asked, I said, “I invited you,” to my boyfriend, only partly joking. “No you didn’t,” he protested. “You just said, ‘This is what I’m doing on my birthday.’” …

What I Learned From My Stalker

(Graphic: Kat Borosky/TueNight.com) I may have the word “open” tattooed on my back, but I consider myself overly cautious. By nature of being a sex writer, many people think I’ve offered myself up for explicit, inappropriate conversations, and that’s forced me to keep my guard up. Normally, I don’t answer my phone unless I know who’s calling. I vet strangers I’m meeting extensively online beforehand. On a recent flight, I even took my laptop to the bathroom rather than leave it unprotected in the seat back compartment. My caution is what stopped me from contacting a man I met on my flight to Dubai after I let him borrow my phone charger; I didn’t want to give him the wrong impression. I was excited about this trip to Dubai, and announced it on my blog, Twitter and Facebook in case friends had recommendations or knew people there. The primary purpose of my trip was to find the world’s first and only Hello Kitty Spa, which had recently opened (yes, I was 36 going on 13, …