Year: 2019

TueNight 10: Mimi Hui

Age: 46! Quick bio: Mimi is a Senior Director of Technical Products at WeWork San Francisco. She’s an avid (but extremely slow) watercolorist and is working on a selection for a future show. Beyond the Bio:  “I became pregnant somewhat unexpectedly at 45, and then lost my baby. This triggered a series of health issues, including a dormant chronic illness which may not have a cure. It’s taught me to enjoy what’s in front of me, be very focused, and to be financially prudent in the event that I won’t be able to work and have skyrocketing health costs. I need to be sure that I can care for myself as much as possible. It’s also considerably amped up my snarky-ness.” 1. On the nightstand: My puppy’s collar — we have a silly ritual where I take off his collar before we settle in to bed and then I exclaim, “Look! You’re nekkid and ready for bed!” 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Being a New Yorker/wondering how to get more sleep 3. Jam of the minute: Silence — it’s really relaxing 4. Thing I miss: My …

5 Foodie Picks for Gifts with Good Taste

’Tis the season of giving, and I’ve gone through my very large bag of tricks for fab finds for even the pickiest of eaters and/or receivers. 1. A Pinch of Style Whenever I am at a total loss on what to give, I always know I can ping Amanda McClements and her knowledgeable staff at Salt & Sundry for inspiring ideas. For the sherry or wine lover, a Spanish Porrón; for the woman who has everything, a set of insanely chic matte-black Picardie tumblers; and for the eco-conscious, a collection of stainless steel drink straws.  Spanish porron, $48; tumblers, $6 each; stainless steel straws, $18, Salt and Sundry.  2. A Taste of DC Given that I am from DC, I love giving DC-centric gifts to my favorite foodies and Shop Made DC is an obvious destination. Their ‘DC Loves To Cook’ package includes uber-cool items like a cutting board imprinted with the city’s three-star logo, a variety of salsas, chips, hot sauce, and the must-have D.C. mumbo sauce.  $130, DC Loves to Cook.  3. Italian …

TueNight 10: Kenrya Rankin

Age: 38  Quick Bio: Kenrya Rankin is an award-winning writer and editorial consultant. She hosts the literary erotica podcast “The Turn On,” and her latest project, How We Fight White Supremacy: A Field Guide to Black Resistance, is now available as an audiobook. Beyond the Bio: “After many years spent splitting myself into easily digestible parts — this is the writer part, this is the activist part, this is the part who doesn’t bite her tongue — I’m now clear that I’m my best when I bring my entire self to every situation. Gone are the exhausting days of deciding who to be each moment, of worrying how I’ll be received, of worrying that I won’t be enough — and it feels amazing.” 1. On the nightstand: I’m in the middle of scouting literary erotica written by Black women for season two of my podcast; there are sooooo many books in my phone waiting for me to finish them. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Not sleeping? Seriously, I don’t sleep enough. 3. Jam of the minute: “Up Late,” by Ari …

Gifts Under $25, $10 for Office Secret Santas, Yankee Swaps

Welcome to that time of year  when you need to find a gift for the seemingly impossible: an affordable, somewhat generic, yet memorable gift for people you don’t know that well (the office Secret Santa), or for people you know entirely too well (the family swap). And if it’s an office swap? Well, then you need a gift that people will fight over and keep stealing from each other, so you can emerge victorious as having the best taste or the best sense of humor or, you know, just for being cool. No pressure. And no worries! As a longtime internet shopping ninja and former magazine editor — with about a billiondy gift guides under my ninja black belt — I’ve got you covered, for gifts under $25 and for under $10. So do I emerge as looking like I have good taste, a good sense of humor, and being cool? Thank you very much. That’s the gift that keeps on giving. Happy holidaze! UNDER $25 1. Chic Drinking GlassesSimple, chic, pretty and really useful …

9 Books for a Better World

Let’s face it: The ’10s have been quite the shitshow of a decade. Given the sad state of our democracy, extrajudicial police killings, and the reinvigoration of fascism and white supremacy, never before have I wished so hard for peace on Earth and goodwill toward humanity. So, as a firm believer in the transformative power of a good book, I invite you to roar your way through the ’20s, starting with these deep, daring, delicious reads.  1. Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments by Saidiya Hartman Did you know that at the beginning of the twentieth century, young Black women in New York and Philly sparked a radical cultural movement defined by free love, queer relations, and alternative forms of cohabitation, intimacy, and kinship bonds? Neither did I, until I read this aching, gorgeous, brilliant book. Hartman spins painstaking research into gold that reads like fiction. It is at once scholarly and literary, imaginative and the hardest truths. $28.95, wwnorton.com 2. Breathe: A Letter to My Sons by Imani PerryAt a time when Black children’s lives are …

TueNight 10: Heather Frank

Age: I am 60 and a proud perennial Quick bio: Heather Frank is a cabaret artist based in Washington, DC. Her most recent one-woman show was “Love in the Time of Coloring.” She recently made her New York debut at Pangea and is working on a new show about the creative process, “I’m Making This Up,” coming in 2020.  Beyond the bio: “I started my career as a professional writer and editor and then became an executive at media companies like AOL, Meredith and Gannett. Creating and performing have always been my love, though, and I channelled those interests in different ways. Cabaret brings all of my talents together at a time in my life when I’m feeling pretty fearless and generally unsupervised.” 1. On the nightstand: The new biography, Marjorie Merriweather Post: The Life Behind the Luxury by Estella M. Chung. I’m a deep admirer of all things Mrs. Post — her philanthropy, her business acumen, her glamour and her extraordinary capacity for enchanting people through extravagant and thoughtful hospitality. I love spending time at Hillwood Estate …

Useful and chic? Yes! 7 Great Gifts to Give

To my mind, the point of gifting is to give another person something that becomes indispensable to them, or very nearly so. To that end, I like finding attractive, well-designed versions of useful, everyday things, because that way the items in question will actually be loved and used, instead of re-gifted or put away in a drawer somewhere—which is always the fear.  1. Emile Henry Salt Pig First of all, you just have to love something called a salt pig, and I like how it looks kind of retro and space-age. It’s also a super-handy and easily accessible way to store salt, and when you’re done cooking, it looks great on your dining room table. Also, it comes in a ton of good colors, but I’m partial to this poppy red, which is what I have in my kitchen. $40, Bed, Bath & Beyond 2. Brass clips Your gift-ee can use these cool brass clips as she would an ordinary paperclip, or as a bookmark. I think the shapes are really cheery and fun. $18, …

TueNight 10: Angela Howze Pitts

Photo courtesy of Angela Howze Pitts Age: 49 Quick bio: Angela lives in the Fredericksburg, VA, area where she is an armchair social media activist/philosopher on Facebook. She makes a living as an IT Consultant in DC and spends (too) much of her time on the sidelines of basketball courts and soccer fields with her sports-obsessed sons and husband. Beyond the Bio: “The most memorable years of my career and public life were in my 20s and early 30s working as an English teacher/instructor in a high school and community college, and then as a public librarian. Those experiences sparked an enduring passion in me for public education. It took me a while to reconcile in my mind that my calling would be separate and distinct from my career once I settled into being an IT consultant, but I appreciate the way in which my career doesn’t require an emotional investment and leaves me energy to invest in my family and the causes I really care about. Also, it pays well.” 1. On the nightstand: A …

I Wanted to Say Thanks; I Ended Up Saying Sorry

When I decided to mark my 50th birthday year by writing thank-you letters to people who had helped, inspired, and shaped me in my life, the last thing on my mind was forgiveness. But writing those thank-you letters turned out to be harder, deeper, and more meaningful than I’d ever hoped, in large part because it drove home the ways in which gratitude and forgiveness are twinned in human nature. By challenging myself to acknowledge all the ways in which I had been helped over the years, I necessarily faced facts: there were situations in which I hadn’t always conducted myself in a way that made me deserving of the help. And in situations where I’d clung to historical slights by a family member or close friend, writing a letter documenting all the ways those people had supported me over the years made me blush with embarrassment over my hard work and determination to maintain ancient disappointments. Making amends as I went, whether in the text of the letters I wrote or simply by promising …

TueNight 10: Ada Calhoun

Age: 43 Basic bio: Ada is the author of the NYC history St. Marks Is Dead, the marriage memoir Wedding Toasts I’ll Never Give, and the generation-defining book about the midlife crisis of Gen X women, Why We Can’t Sleep, out January 7, 2020 (pre-order now!). Beyond the Bio: “My favorite thing about being this age is that I have a small army of women friends who I would trust with my life. Being with them takes the edge off even the worst weeks.” 1. On the nightstand: A dangerously tall tower of books. A glass of water. So many hair ties. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Watching Law & Order SVU if I come across it while channel-surfing. Playing Scrabble on my phone. 3. Jam of the minute: The Replacements, “Color Me Impressed.” 4. Thing I miss: Wearing high heels all day without having to carry backup sneakers in my bag. 5. 80s crush: River Phoenix, especially in Running on Empty. When he cries? Jesus. 6. Current crush: Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr. 7. Will whine about: Sleeping poorly. Running out of coffee. Forgetting what day it is. …

Am I Bullied by the Past? Or Just by My Memories?

In the very early days of Facebook, back when people “poked” each other, I received two friend requests, both from women I’d originally met in Grade 8. Both sent me chatty messages, congratulating me on the arrival of my new baby, commiserating about the trials of integrating newborns into the emotional lives of their toddler siblings, and updating me on their whereabouts, relationships and careers over the previous 20 years. The irony of their sweet messages wasn’t lost on me. In the eighth grade, I’d been the new kid, parachuted across the country from my tiny, all-girls, private-school class in Vancouver, British Columbia, to a public junior high in suburban Toronto. I was awkward, friendless, and scared, all of which was likely noted by the group of girls I half-fell in with. I spent that year in a state of watchfulness, arriving at school each morning wary about how my status in the group might have shifted overnight.  Toward the end of the year, an anonymous, handwritten note appeared in my art folder. The letter, …

TueNight 10: Evelyn Taylor Bonner

Evelyn Taylor Bonner with her wares at the West Elm in Red Bank, New Jersey (photo courtesy Evelyn Taylor Bonner) Age: 53 Quick bio: Evelyn is a full-time ceramic artist living in the super-hip Philly suburb of Collingswood, New Jersey. Her work is featured at the five West Elm stores in New Jersey, and she’s currently busy filling wholesale orders and prepping for her 7th annual Open Studio event happening December 7-8.  Beyond the bio: “I’ve worked my ass off to get here, and now, at 53, I’m kinda living the dream. So much therapy, so much hard work, and so many supportive friends helped me get here. I married an amazing man whom I had known for 30 years prior (friendship turned to romance), left behind a 20 year arts-marketing career to become a full-time artist, and reluctantly adopted my MIL’s cat who’s now a miracle of love in our home. It’s not always easy around here, but I’m incredibly grateful.” 1. On the nightstand: Weekly New York Times mag. Now if I could only …

TueNight 10: Kate Hanley

Age: 49. I actually enjoy saying the number because in my mind I’m already telling myself I’m 50 in preparation; but I’ve still got seven months of my 40s left, dammit! Quick Bio: Kate is the host of the podcast “How to Be a Better Person” and author of the book of the same name. She lives in Providence, RI with her husband, two kids, and a rescue dog named Cookie. Beyond the Bio: “The thing I love the most about full-on middle age is losing the compulsion to have people like me and speaking up; the thing that trips me out is all the things you thought would never happen to you, happening to you: crepey skin, thinning hair, a new sun spot every week, needing reading glasses, developing a wattle, feeling time speed up. Sometimes I look in the mirror and I’m like, “who is that?” But, hey, I’m younger than I’ll ever be, and I’m fairly healthy. I appreciate these things immensely and really try not to take them for granted.”  1. On the …

TueNight 10: Stephanie Genkin

Age: 54 Quick Bio: Stephanie Genkin is a Certified Financial Planner and Founder of My Financial Planner,LLC, a New York Registered Investment Advisor, working with real people on an hourly basis. She is a media strategist for the nonprofit organization World Learning and an adjunct instructor at NYU. Stephanie is also a proud sponsor of 2019 TueNight storytelling events. Beyond the bio: “I think my family is still pretty shocked I became a career money geek, having shown no interest in earning a buck or living in a capitalist country for a good chunk of my adult life. I’m still amazed at the painless transition of my professional identity from roving print reporter in the Middle East to CNN interview producer to financial advisor for the 99 percent.” 1. On the nightstand: How to be an Antiracist (JUST READ IT!);  The Hidden Life of Trees, because I love walking and spend time in nature this time of year; Persian Mirrors, it’s been around for awhile but I want Elaine Sciolino to be my writing teacher and her books are the next best thing; …

Green on the Green: Learning Golf at 59

Amy hits the green on the Kissing Camels Course in Colorado Springs last month. (Photo courtesy of the author) The ball sat high on the tee, as if waiting patiently while I ran through my mental checklist.  Lean forward – but not too much. Bend your knees – but not too much.  Turn your hips and shoulders – but not your head. Follow through – definitely follow through. I swung the club, anticipating the thwack! that signals a solid drive. Nope. Not a sound, except the swoosh of my driver pushing the air.  This frustrating scenario is a familiar one, as I have recently set about learning the torturous sport of golf.  It feels weird to be an absolute beginner at age 59. I’m a veteran at so many things at this point: writing, marriage, mothering, and yoga, to name a few. But in the realm of golf, a true beginner is what I am indeed, right down to having to learn the anatomy of a golf club. (Who knew there was a heel and …

Nancy Rabinowitz Friedman

TueNight 10: Nancy Rabinowitz Friedman

Nancy (at right), with her Feed Our Democracy Partner Isabel Kallman, giving out free hugs at the NYC Pride parade Age: 54 Quick bio: Nancy is one of the co-founders of Feed Our Democracy, a grassroots organization dedicated to encouraging activism and raising hell. She is the co-founder of KidzVuz Media, and the vice chair of the board of Transport Theatre Group, an off-Broadway theatre company.   Beyond the Bio: “The hardest part about being over 50 is the invisibility, but it’s also the most freeing. It’s only when the general public started looking at me less that I was able to see myself more clearly.”  1. On the nightstand: The Porpoise, by Mark Haddon (he also wrote The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time), Do Not Say We Have Nothing, by Madeline Thien. And ,very uncharacteristically for me, since I almost exclusively read fiction, Sapiens, by Youval Noah Harrari. That last one is brilliant but slow going. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Eating carbs. Life is not worth living without carbs. Seriously. 3. Jam of the minute: I’m a Broadway Geek. (I even …

TueNight 10: Felicity Enders

Age: 47. I think. I always have to stop and do the math! Quick Bio: Felicity is a Professor of Biostatistics at Mayo Clinic, where she leads a large group of clinical statisticians. Now that she’s a full professor, she’s become open about her interest in diversity and inclusion. Beyond the Bio: “I really enjoy finally being old enough to say what I really think. So, now I’m working on ‘softening my image’ to avoid scaring people too much when I tell it like it is.” 1. On the nightstand: Jason Fung’s The Complete Guide to Fasting 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Talking (bragging or worrying) about kids 3. Jam of the minute: 1491 audiobook. Third time through! 4. Thing I miss: Ummmm… living in the moment without serious care for the future. 5. 80s crush: Tom Cruise. Who now makes me shudder.  6. Current crush: Matt Damon. Can’t get enough! 7. Will whine about: Chronic sleep deprivation  8. Will wine about: Any interaction with former sexist/racist boss 9. Best thing that happened recently: Husband became a stay at home dad. HOORAY!!!!! 10. Looking forward to: Going to Sicily …

Benish Shah and Carla Zanoni at TueNight Live

TueNight 10: Carla Zanoni

Benish Shah (left) and Carla Zanoni at TueNight’s Day of Action Age: 45  Quick bio: Carla is a digital strategist, writer and journalist in NYC. She is working on a memoir about the recovery of self worth, based on her 21-year journey from drug addiction to career and life success. Beyond the Bio: “When I turned 40 I had a beautiful moment as I walked down the street: I liked myself. I realized I had managed to not only survive, but thrive. Now I feel a confidence, steadiness, and self love I hadn’t experienced before. This feels like the combined gifts of self inquiry, the power of age and experience.” 1. On the nightstand: The Buly 1803 rose oil I put on my face and elbows before bed, a new 5 year journal where I keep a gratitude list, about 20 different pens, an azurite malachite stone I bought in Paris, and a tiny ceramic jar I reach for each night after I realize I once again forgot to take out my earrings before going to sleep.  2. Can’t …

TueNight 10: Penelope Codrington

Age: 52  Quick bio: Penelope dreams of abandoning her legal career and surrendering to her vocation: purposeful storytelling. She enjoys writing essays and performing stories with a social justice or uplifting theme and is grateful for any opportunity to share them. Beyond the Bio: “A decade ago, I decided that I was tired of feeling invisible. I forced myself to speak up, stand out and choke down feelings of insecurity in places and situations where I felt unwelcome. It’s been a life changing exercise, so freeing and empowering.” 1. On the nightstand: Guanahani, My Love by Marion Bethel, a wonderful attorney/poet/writer/activist from The Bahamas. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: I’m obsessed with the scary drama of the impeachment proceedings. 3. Jam of the minute: Any tune on the Deep House or Frankie Knuckles stations on Pandora. 4. Thing I miss: Dancing in New York night clubs until closing, emerging tired and happy to a bright Sunday morning and slowly walking home drinking a New York Seltzer peach soda. 5. 80s crush: LL Cool J 6. Current crush: Brian K. (my dude), the sweetest, sexiest man ever!  He’s …

TueNight 10: Cara Raich

Age: 45 Quick Bio: Cara, a former attorney, is a mediator and group dialogue specialist who engages with institutions to help create more respectful workplace cultures and solve employee relations or governance conflicts. Cara also helps groups of all types have challenging conversations in a structured and productive manner. Beyond the bio: “Having been to almost 30 countries, I’d say travel early and often. And at some point do it alone. Solo travel is so empowering. Nothing beats adding to one’s memory bank and experiencing new people and cultures is a wonderful way to do that. And have girlfriends. Good, solid girlfriends who will tell you when your clothes are awful, your hair is a mess and you have food in your teeth, who then hug you and give you wine.” 1. On the nightstand: She Said, the jaw dropping back story of the Harvey Weinstein story told by the reporters who broke the story, Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey. Just read it. These women are remarkable professionals who exemplified tenacity, journalistic integrity, grit and excellent judgment …

The Welcome Issue

Margit Note’s: We are so thrilled to have Sloane Davidson guest-curate TueNight’s Welcome issue. As the founder of Hello Neighbor, Sloane works tirelessly for the needs of refugee families, helping them acclimate to their everyday lives here in the U.S., by connecting them with neighbors and mentors in their new neighborhoods. So she is particularly apt to edit this edition all about the many paths and journeys to becoming an American citizen. Here’s Sloane: I have the immense privilege to spend a lot of time with refugee families. As the founder of a nonprofit that supports recently resettled refugees through mentorship, I can often find myself sitting on the floor playing with children, profusely thanking moms for their tea and hospitality, or shaking hands and showing my respect to elders.  But my life wasn’t always like this.  When I became pregnant with my first child, I felt a draw for my unborn child to be around extended family. And so after 16 years of living away, I moved back to Pittsburgh, my beloved hometown, and was …

TueNight Live: Photos From Our #DayofAction

All photos by Neil Kramer On September 17, National Constitution and Citizenship Day, we gathered in Brooklyn for a truly impactful #DayofAction. With our friends from Feed Our Democracy, and essays curated by Sloane Davidson of Hello Neighbor, we listened to TueNighters share their stories while raising thousands of dollars for Hello Neighbor, an organization that helps new refugees settle in the U.S. via mentorship programs. Here are some photos from a fantastic evening of doing good. See even more photos on Facebook It’s always a fulfilling, hilarious, thought-provoking night at a TueNight Live! Thanks to all our sponsors — Ruth Ann Harnisch, Hint, Industrious, My Financial Planner, R&D FOods and #TueNighters! Thanks for coming out and see you next time!

TueNight 10: Benish Shah

Age: 37 Quick bio: Benish has worked in almost every industry from law to baby food to tech, and kind of loves it. She’s currently the Chief Growth Officer for Loop and Tie. She is the author of the children’s book The Splendiferous Spillerella and has a new book for adults in the works. Beyond the Bio: “If 25 year old me saw my life right now, she would be both sad, confused, and incredibly proud. I’ve survived PTSD — some Lifetime-movie level life things — switched careers and industries, and live in an apartment with a view I could have only dreamed of.  My life has been nothing that I imagined it would be, good and bad. My only true unanswered question in life is: why did Mindy Kaling get famous before me? Because now everyone says I talk like her…but have they ever considered, she talks like me?” 1. On the nightstand: A book of poems by Nikita Gill, lavender balm by Eu Genia, and yes an obsidian stone that sits on my book of Muslim prayers. …

The 5th Grade Mehndi Mishap

In the early 1990s, most people didn’t know what henna was, let alone the variation of the word “mehndi.” You see, Gwen Stefani had not happened at that time, and mainstream audiences hadn’t quite accepted that South Asia was “the land of colors and magic” just yet. During that time, my family lived in a town called Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania. I say that as if the town does not exist anymore, but it does, and we still have extended family who love living there.  The Mechanicsburg of the early ‘90s was different than it is now. There weren’t many minorities. In fact, in my entire elementary school there was one African American kid. He was the adopted son of our wonderful and white Principal, Ms. Ingram. The other minorities in school consisted of: me, my younger sister, and an Asian girl named Chloe whom I tried, and failed, to befriend. She was cooler than me back then because the early ‘90s was also not the age of the smart-girl dominance. Despite the lack of diversity, Mechancisburg …

American Accent: Passing — and not Passing — as a Latina

(Carla and her parents. Photo courtesy of the author.) One of my favorite childhood memories is of me sitting with my mother on her bed, recording ourselves reading articles to one another. She would look at me and slowly say, acutely aware of her Argentine accent, “I am prac-tis-sing my ello-cue-shon en Eng-lish,” and I would fall into a peal of giggles. I didn’t know my mother thought she needed to change her accent until that moment. I don’t know that I was even aware she had an accent until I was around that age. To me, my mother’s accent was just my mother’s voice.  My family moved to New York City from Buenos Aires on the winter solstice of 1975. It was one of the two coldest winters of the century; my father and mother were 26 and 25. I was 16 months old and my twin brothers just 4 months.  I imagine my parents shivering in their light wool coats and thin leather gloves meant for a mild Argentininean winter as we were …

Make America Great Again: The Canadian Edition

When I was a kid, coming to “the States,” as we called it, was the shit. I mean, you guys had everything. I had never seen that many types of breakfast cereal in my short, Canadian life. The soda aisle alone blew my 9-year-old mind… PURPLE SODA? America the beautiful, indeed.  But other than those occasional Sunday family drives to Plattsburgh, New York—and the obligatory trip to Disney World, when I was 4—my primary exposure to the U.S. as I was growing up was via TV and the news. American presidents are so present and powerful when you live just next door. You almost feel as if they are your president, too. But mostly, the States was just fine—like an annoying older brother, always around, obligated to protect you, much stronger than you, and a little less refined. I certainly had no grand plans to live there.  But, life intervenes: 25-year-old girl meets boy, decides to find a job in a different country, and moves there to see if it will all work out. In …

Maid in the U.S.A.: The Invisible Helpers

My mother was raised in a wealthy household in Guyana. Somewhere in my files, there is a clipping from the Guyana Chronicle, a photo of a pretty girl in a hoop skirt, performing on the piano for Princess Margaret. Her father, Mayor of Georgetown, watches proudly. That girl is my mother. She went on to earn her degrees in music performance at a London conservatory, where she met a handsome British army officer from Barbados. My parents moved around Europe and then to a newly independent Barbados where the marriage swiftly disintegrated. One day she snatched up her children and brought them to Boston, forbidding us any contact with our dear father. In Boston, my mother, who performed on television in Barbados, disappeared into the crowd of invisible Black immigrants. When she met a Jamaican lady who cleaned houses for rich people, she became part of an underground network, scrubbing floors and doing laundry for a pittance.  One Saturday, I accompanied her when she worked in a large house on a leafy street in Brookline. …

Why the United States Remains a Beacon of Hope

I have been working really hard the last couple of months. I’m an attorney in New York City and one case has really consumed me. It is a pro bono asylum case, my first. The trial was today. Let me tell you about it. My client is a gay man from Uganda, a country that criminalizes homosexuality and makes consensual same-sex sex illegal. Violence and discrimination are routinely perpetrated by both state and non-state actors against the LGBTQIA population. The political and religious leaders actively stoke homophobia and violence, and are aided in this process by a vicious tabloid press that solicits tips to out people—those outed are often arrested and imprisoned, and/or attacked and shunned by their communities.  The general belief in Uganda is that homosexuality is like a disease, but also the product of poor parenting, and is contagious and often transmitted by people setting out to induce others, especially kids, into homosexuality. It is a huge taboo.  Mob justice is a form of extrajudicial killing prevalent in Uganda—mobs will form almost spontaneously …

TueNight 10: Sloane Davidson

Age: 39 (Almost in our demo!) Quick Bio: Sloane is the Founder and CEO of Hello Neighbor, a nonprofit that supports refugees and immigrants through mentorship. Next Tuesday, September 17th, 2019 she is co-hosting a TueNight Live #DayofAction and will be curating our new issue next week, “Welcome.” Beyond the bio: “I’m less than a month away from 40. Where did this decade go? As I near my birthday I keep thinking about the road I took to get here. The people that influenced me. How content I am now and how I never ever thought I would get here. There is a stillness to me, mixed in with my drive, because I finally feel like I’m doing something I was meant to do and everything led up to this moment. It’s dramatic but that’s where I am and I’m trying to sit in it and appreciate that because it was hard AF to get here and I don’t want to rush into looking ahead without appreciating the journey.” 1. On the nightstand: Fight Like A Mother by Shannon Watts, Memoirs of a Born …