Year: 2019

TueNight 10: Mary Lee Kortes

Quick bio: Mary Lee Kortes is a singer/songwriter, author, performer and teacher. She has six albums released under the name Mary Lee’s Corvette, and her first book, Dreaming of Dylan: 115 Dreams About Bob, has just been published by BMG Books. Beyond the bio: “My life right now is far more incredible than I could have imagined, although the hope and desire for where I am now was always there. I didn’t even really get started at what I wanted and was meant to do until I was in my 30s. I had to fight the strange voices in my head telling me to sit in the corner and be still, don’t bother anyone. Hardly my true self, and hardly the appropriate behavior for someone who wants to create. Hardly the demeanor of someone about to embark on a book and music tour of Russia!” 1. On the nightstand: The Future is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia by Masha Gessen.  2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Singing and imagining 3. Jam of the minute: Glenn Morrow’s Cry for Help 4. Thing I miss: My mom 5. 80s …

TueNight 10: Sylvia Wehrle

Age: 48 Quick bio: Sylvia is the founder and creative director of user experience design of June, a wellness and skincare brand that incorporates full spectrum hemp oil into their products. Her interest in user experience design, chemistry, math and wellness have collided in a perfect storm that is June. Sylvia lives in Brooklyn with her husband, daughters and dogs. Beyond the bio: “I love being over 40. What has really crystallized for me is my ability to take risks creatively, think expansively and then execute on those ideas in a fearless way.” 1. On the nightstand: Wunderland by Jennifer Cody Epstein, and June edible drops 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Learning new things 3. Jam of the minute: Spotify playlist: Women of R&B 4. Thing I miss:  A world before Snapchat…I have two teenage daughters. 5. 80s crush: Pierce Brosnan, a.k.a. Remington Steel 6. Current crush: My husband Neil Wehrle 7. Will whine about: My kids getting off their screens 8. Will wine about: Hanging with friends outside when the weather is good — talking about politics, retiring to a commune somewhere in northern Spain and eating good …

TueNight 10: Alison Mazer

Age: 50 Quick bio: Alison is an entertainment management consultant and booking agent. A native New Yorker, she literally grew up backstage at Lincoln Center. Beyond the bio: “Two years ago I found my father in a life crisis, with dementia and evicted. He had left when I was a baby and never raised me, didn’t help my Mom with much money. He never showed any interest in my son and wasn’t a grandfather to him. My father had always been extremely self-centered and absent from my life. Nonetheless, when given the choice of helping him or looking away and letting him be mentally ill and homeless, I decided to help him. I was surprised by how good  it felt.” 1. On the nightstand: Courage To Change—there is addiction in my family. The Other Side of Paradise by Staceyann Chin—I adore her!  Breakfast at Tiffany’s—Truman Capote is one of my most favorite writers. Labello lip balm, a nail file, L’Occitane Shea Butter Hand Cream, a lamp made out of a large canning jar. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Dancing. I take a dance …

TueNight Live: Photos from SECRET

All photos by Erika Hokanson. Shh… Sometimes our stories are for select ears only. But for this Spring edition of TueNight Live we were ready to reveal our most clandestine tales. Our theme was “Secret” and we had six readers tell all. As part of the Invisible Dog Art Center’s Open Studios week, we were proud to pack the house with more than 100 “grown-ass women” and feature artwork by many of the ID’s women artists. Here are some fabulous photos from the evening’s festivities. MIngling before the show. With wine and snacks in hand and friends met, we were ready to start. Margit kicks us off. Hitha Hertzog disclosed the first secret of the night: as a closet conservative, she was reconsidering her loyalties. Alison Mazer detailed her quest to find a discontinued lipstick:. Bringing joy to the audience. Financial planner and sponsor Stephanie Genkin, CFP®, also known My Financial Planner, introduced our next secret reader. Thank you Stehanie! Diane di Costanzo talked about our financial lives and the significance of talking about them — …

The Secret Issue: Shhh…

We all have secrets. I like to think I’m an upfront, transparent kind of gal, yet there are a lot of things I’ve never told anyone. Hey, what if I told you a secret right now? Oh hell no, this is not that kind of post.  A secret isn’t to be toyed with. It’s not some flitty, flighty gossip, it’s a long-held, deep and dark. We keep a secret because it has perceived power. If unleashed, it might impact others — or it might affect how they see us.  Secrets can be good or bad. A friend tells you they are pregnant and to keep it hush-hush until she’s ready. A colleague comes out of the closet to only you, “Can you keep a secret?” And then there are secrets that cause insurmountable pain — a secret love affair, a state secret that if unleashed would cause destruction. A secret recipe that if divulged would mean millions of people would know how to make my grandmother’s perfect chocolate pudding. Locked away. In midlife we take stock …

61% of Women Would Rather Talk About Their Own Deaths Than This Topic

My trigger to stop being so secretive about money occurred in a Palm Springs hot tub, while my sister and I were parboiling ourselves under a clump of shaggily glamorous palm trees. She is 61, I’m 59 and we were talking about money for the first time since the days when our “salaries” came in the form of weekly allowance from someone we called Mommy. Which is to say, we were having a meaningful money discussion for the first time in a half century.  “How much do you make?” she asked. I told her. I asked her the same question.   She answered it.  “Oh, O.K.,” we said simultaneously.  And then, as if we had walked through a heretofore unseen wall, we started talk openly about all sorts of money matters: how much money the family lost after the IRS caught up with some early-80s tax-filing shenanigans; “Mommy’s” financial situation; how much we had saved for retirement.  It was an inexpressible relief to discuss our family’s complicated relationship with money. The short story: my mother’s father made …

Lipstick Secrets: My Quest to Wear Parallel Red, Forever

In 1986, during my first month of college at SUNY Purchase, I spotted a woman on campus wearing the most beautiful, fire-engine-red lipstick — and no other makeup. Just the lipstick. She had curly brown hair, parted on the side just like mine, and her red lips made a singular statement. I walked right up to her and got the name of the lipstick: Estée Lauder’s Parallel Red.  Until this point, I’d only seen girls wear glossy light pink, frosted pink or iridescent pink gloss. No one that I knew wore bold, red colors even though I grew up in NYC. The only strong red lipstick I had seen was my Mom’s stage makeup.  As soon as I could get to a department store, I bought it. From that day on I never wore another lip color or any other makeup. I didn’t need eye makeup or blush; this red was enough to light up my whole face. I wore it everywhere: to see bands, to grocery shop. Because there were two Alisons in my …

A Onetime “Closeted” Republican Decides to Come Out — and Slam the Door.

The term “closeted” has been used to describe many marginalized groups. It rarely has been used to describe a brown woman who is a Republican.  Let me explain.  Growing up I was the girl version of Alex P. Keaton. When Family Ties would air during prime time, I would beg my mother to let me watch. Not because I loved the snappy one-liners of Justine Bateman’s character. I loved how Alex would use Socratic method to lay out conservative arguments with his parents. I took copious mental notes.  My divorced Indian parents were split down the middle when it came to politics. My mother was Elyse Keaton while my father was a skinnier, browner, better dressed Archie Bunker. My mom would host ACLU meetings at her house. My dad would play golf with rich, white, old guys secretly hoping he would become one of them.  In 1996 I was excited to cast my first vote. Because of my age, I had missed the 1991/1992 elections by two years.  During his campaign, Bill Clinton came out like a lightening …

Learning the Truth About My Real Father

Growing up, I never knew my name. I mean, I had a name but I never knew it because I was called “Piggy” since I was born. Story goes, when my mom gave me a bottle, I curled my hands and feet like pig’s hooves around it. How fucking adorable. Just call me bacon why don’t you?! We lived in Crown Heights, Bedford Stuyvesant, & Prospect Heights, Brooklyn in the late 60s and early 70s. You could say my mom was a rolling stone and wherever she lay her hat was her home. By the age of 25 she had seven kids by six different daddies. Yeah, I know. My mom was rolling more than her hat back in the day. No judgment! My Dad must have loved my mom because by the time they met, she’d already had three kids by three different men. He still wanted to be with her. I love my Dad for his persistence in getting with my mom but looking back, they broke up mainly because my mother continued …

TueNight 10: Rachel Cline

Age: 62 Quick bio: Rachel Cline is a writer and editor. Red Hen Press just published her third novel, The Question Authority, which took her ten years to write. It’s about a middle-aged woman coming to terms with the lifelong impact of her 8th grade teacher’s bad behavior. Beyond the Bio: I like to write about women who struggle with everyday life, because I am one of them. I’ve done a lot of  different jobs to keep that going: from proofreading the yellow pages to writing (with others) season 13 of Knots Landing and taking the curse words out of Glengarry Glen Ross so they could show it on a plane. For the past ten years, I’ve held various jobs behind-the-scenes at the NYC Department of Education, but I’m “retiring” next week! I’m so psyched to purge my wardrobe of stretchy non-descript black slacks: see ya Marissa/Sloan/Cassidy/Curvy/Sailor/Crop! Anyway, my close friendships (mostly with women I’ve known since the 80s) are what I care most about and what sustains me. 1. On the nightstand: Ocean nasal spray, CBD salve, Stitcher …

TueNight 10: Joanna Briley

Age: 50 Quick bio: Joanna is a New York City-based actor, stand-up comedian and writer. She has appeared on Lifetime TV’s “Fempire” ad campaign, “Watch What Happens Live” with Andy Cohen, and several appearances on Wendy Williams “Street Talk” segment. Beyond the bio: “In 2018, I created the “Black Women in Comedy Festival,” which was an amazing call to action for black women comedians who are hilariously talented yet routinely overlooked by the industry. With over 20 years in the comedy business, I felt compelled to create this festival to highlight the wide range of comedy, storytelling, improv, and sketch from the perspectives of black women in a supportive and safe environment. I am proud to say that the festival empowered so many funny black women who just needed someone cheering for them and rooting for their success. We look forward to opening more doors in the coming years.” 1. On the nightstand: Lust for Life by Sylvester McNutt III, Keto Clarity by Jimmy Moore with Eric C. Westman, MD, She’s So Funny by Judy Brown and Essence Magazine. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: …

TueNight 10: Marci Alboher

Age: I’m more than willing to #saymyage, 53 Bio: Vice President of Strategic Communications for Encore.org, “I cook up ideas for Encore.org on how to frame longer lives as a force for good and intergenerational connection as a natural way of life. I’m really excited about our Encore Public Voices Fellowship, a partnership with the OpEd Project to identify and support 20 diverse thought leaders working on issues relating to aging, longevity, intergenerational connection and social justice.” Marci also serves on the board of Girls Write Now, a phenomenal organization empowering girls through writing and mentoring. (If you’re in New York City, you should check out one of their Spring events.) Beyond the bio: “In my free time, I walk excessively around Manhattan, and recently started taking piano lessons to keep the brain sharp. My long-term hobby is low-skates poker (Omaha) with a group of artist/writer types — and increasingly, my mom’s pals. The coolest thing about being middle-aged is that you are perfectly positioned for cross-generational friendships up and down the age chain!” 1. On the nightstand: Mary Pipher’s Women Rowing North: Navigating Life’s Currents and Flourishing as We …

TueNight 10: Anne Mourier

Age: 55 years old. Quick Bio: A conceptual artist, a mother, and a feminist who loves men, Anne Mourier hails from France and New York (and a little bit from Venice, too). Her latest performance “Cycle,” in collaboration with artist 2Fik, will be presented during the open studio weekend at The Invisible Dog Art Center in Brooklyn in May.  Beyond the bio: “I love more and more human interactions. Material things have less importance for me as time goes by. This is why I am interested by performances…they allow me to have deeper interactions with strangers. They nourish me and help me progress in my journey. I feel more and more the synchronicities of life also and smile when people are “sent to me.”” 1. On the nightstand: One book from Carl Jung, one book about the spiritual life of water, two books about witches and one artwork from Claudia Paneca. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Not dying my grays and making love. 3. Jam of the minute: A new artwork I bought at the Armory show and have to hang in my apartment …

TueNight 10: Beth Arky

Age: 59 Quick bio: After two decades as an entertainment magazine editor (Entertainment Weekly, TV Guide), Beth now writes personal essays and covers children and teens with developmental, mental health and learning challenges for the nonprofit Child Mind Institute. She is also a warrior mom, advocating for her 15-year-old son, who is on the autism spectrum. Beyond the bio: “At 59, I’ve discovered that I have a strong voice and that confidence can’t be tied to a number on the scale. I’ve also learned the hard way that I need to take care of myself—in other words, put the oxygen mask on first—before I can help anyone else. And since my marriage ended four years ago, I’ve found that dating younger men can be fun!” 1. On the nightstand: The Blue, a historical novel by my friend Nancy Bilyeau; a stack of New Yorkers I’m going to get to one of these days, damn it; my iPhone (I know, terrible for an insomniac like me but it’s a hard habit to break); Lubriderm; a Voluspa candle in French Cade & …

TueNight 10: Alexandra Rosas

Age: 58 years old Quick Bio: Alexandra is a storyteller with The Moth and is a regular contributor to Grown and Flown. Beyond the bio: “Now that I’m older, I’ve learned the value of seeing what it is that you bring to anything. You don’t have “all the time in the world” anymore, so now is the time to earnestly love, respect, and take pride in your talent, your gift, your essence, presence and contribution on this Earth.” 1. On the nightstand: A book. Every day since I was five years old. Right now, it’s The Lonely Bodybuilder by Yukiko Motoya (what a treat). 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Lying to myself about the amount of chocolate I eat. 3. Jam of the minute: MILCK’s “Quiet” 4. Thing I miss: My little babies and the days when I could carry all three at once. 5. 80s crush:  Though he’s not a nice person at all in real life (I waited on him once), Adam Ant. 6. Current crush:  Everybody’s. In other words, Jeff Goldblum. 7. Will whine about:  No one else sees the garbage can overflowing in this …

TueNight 10: Tara Phillips

Age: 47 Quick Bio: Tara is an educator turned aspiring writer who is currently seeking representation for her first book, WEAK, a memoir. She also writes a blog, “My Year on “Mom”bbatical,” a collection of her reflections and experiences while living in Paris and taking a year-long break from parenting her 14-year old son. Beyond the Bio: “Spending this year free of the daily demands of parenting, I realized that I had almost forgotten what life was like before my son came along. I am slowly remembering who I am and what truly sets my soul on fire. I have spent the past 25 years managing and leading in my career, but now, I want to create and connect with my artist self again. As I get older, I am enjoying watching my son get older. Engaging with him at a distance, I’m able to see him as a person. Our interactions feel like a choice we are making together and I find that I really like him as a human being. That feels really good …

TueNight Live: SECRET

Tickets are on sale for our next event! Get all the details and BUY TICKETS HERE! For our Spring edition of TueNight Live we’re spilling SECRETS — some of our deepest, darkest, nearest and dearest. You won’t want to miss this one! Our crew of fabulous grown-ass women tells all. We’ll be back in the art-filled Invisible Dog gallery, with wine, snacks and salacious stories. Our storytellers include: Ada Calhoun (@adacalhoun) is the author of the memoir Wedding Toasts I’ll Never Give, named one of the top ten memoirs of 2017 by Wmagazine; and the history St. Marks Is Dead, one of the best books of 2015, according to Kirkus and the Boston Globe. She has collaborated on several New York Times bestsellers, and written for the New York Times, New York, and The New Republic. Her book Why We Can’t Sleep, based on her viral Oprah.com article “The New Midlife Crisis,” will be out from Grove/Atlantic and Audible in January 2020.  Mary Lee Kortes (@MaryLeeKortes) toured the world both as a headliner and opening act for Bob Dylan and other notables, expanded her creative work to include what she calls …

TueNight 10: Dara Kass

Quick Bio: Dara is a doctor, writer and gender equity advocate who just launched TIME’S UP Healthcare with several other amazing women in medicine. She is also the founder and CEO of FemInEM, an organization for women in emergency medicine. Beyond the Bio: “My life is so full, I feel like I just finished Thanksgiving dinner almost every night. I have been fortunate enough to see the effects of meaningful change in my field, in a flexible and financially viable way. That’s awesome, but sometimes overwhelming. At 41, I am exactly where I want to be in my career, have an awesome family and live in a great neighborhood. And because of what I have seen as an ER doctor and mom, I don’t take one day of this for granted.” 1. On the nightstand: Becoming by Michelle Obama, Indigo and Haze Body Lotionand my cell phone charger. In the drawers is a the collection of crap I try to ignore. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Believing that we are moving forward  Even when we are actively moving backwards. I believe that most people are inherently …

TueNight 10: Tonja Adair

Age: 48 Quick Bio: An architect and urban designer, Tonja co-founded her architectural firmSplice Design with business partner Dawn Bennett almost 10 years ago. Now they have offices in both Atlanta and NYC. Architizer named her one of 20 inspiring minority architects, designers and advocates for a more diverse profession. Tonja says she believes “architecture has the ability to form meaning and provide relevance with attention to our viewpoints and context, the aesthetics of material and form, and the role sustainability can play in our futures.” Beyond the Bio: “I am fortunate to design and consult for clients who want to change how they live or create dynamic places for their clients and customers to enjoy.  We learn daily from our experiences, and with each lesson I remind myself to do what can be done, allow for imperfections, invite playfulness, breathe and be who I am.” 1. On the nightstand: Usually a stack of books ranging from fantasy sci-fi, to inspiration for work and life, and of course pure fiction (although now that I’ve discovered Amazon Prime, the list gets longer) …

TueNight 10: Kelly Notaras

Age: 43 Basic bio: Author of The Book You Were Born to Write (Hay House, 2018). Founder of kn literary arts, a virtual editorial studio helping authors write, edit and publish their books. Beyond the Bio: “I did something kinda crazy last year—after spending my entire adult life in “blue bubbles” like NYC, Boulder and San Francisco, I bought a house in a tiny conservative town full of ranchers and coal miners. I did it for really good reasons: to help co-parent my late partner’s 10-year-old twin boys, and because I could afford to buy here. I renovated the house and painted everything white, including the wood floors. The day the house was finished, I started dating my contractor. The result has been a rich exploration of the very real divide our entire country sits on right now. Somehow we’re making it work but I have shed a lot of tears over how differently two loving and thoughtful people can see the world.”    1. On the nightstand: The best lip balm on the planet, Annemarie Borlind’s For Lips(you’re welcome). Nobody …

TueNight 10: Shira White

Age: 58 chronologically, various in every other metric Quick Bio: Founder of BeautifulNow, a digital media (and soon social commerce) startup that focuses on the most beautiful things happening in the world right now, including the Arts/Design, Impact, Nature/Science/Tech, Food, Travel and Wellness. Beyond the bio: Right now, I am rebuilding major parts of my life: Rebuilding home after catastrophic flood. Rebuilding business with new monetization strategies and goals. Rebuilding community now that I am based in NYC vs mostly in London and constant global traveling. Rebuilding my love life after recently ending a 16-year life partnership. Rebuilding my body after some illness (and all of the above mentioned stresses took their toll). Rebuilding my philanthropic efforts, given all of the above changes. While all of this rebuilding is challenging, to say the least, it comes with so many opportunities for growth, expansion, and new possibility — already I am experiencing some rewards. 1. On the nightstand: My new bullet journal (it actually works!). Barbara Kingsolver’s latest, Unsheltered. Well-read over and over, Diane Ackerman’s I Praise My Destroyer and MFK …

How to Date Your Crazy

I should have known we wouldn’t work out when I messaged him one of my favorite quotes from Alain de Botton. It’s from the On Being podcast “The True Hard Work of Love and Relationships.” In it de Botton says the question we should really be asking on first dates is: “How are you crazy? I’m crazy like this?” “I don’t get it,” he replied via WhatsApp. “How do you ask about crazy?” Of course he didn’t listen to the podcast to find out. I let it pass. He was sweet. He was cute. He was smart. He had his career together. I took this to mean he had his emotional life together too — all of it nicely bundled in a cultivated gift wrap and tied up with the sexy bow of an Australian accent.  We matched on Tinder two days before he moved from New York to Colorado, and when we couldn’t work out a meeting before he left, I figured he’d disappear. But he didn’t. A month after we connected, he flew …

TueNight 10: Candice Cook Simmons

Age: 40 Quick Bio: Candice is the Managing Partner of The Cook Law Group PLLC. She provides legal, business and strategic counsel to clients in the business, technology, and entertainment industries.  Beyond the bio: We asked Candice how has life changed for her as she’s gotten older. “I have a defined perspective. I have lived in six states. I have worked as an attorney for almost sixteen years. I am a wife and a mother and a daughter to aging parents who live in a different state and all of those things create layers to life. I have enough experience and perspective to value every aspect of my blessings—even the annoying things like the temporary discomfort of a sick child or a few sleepless nights. I am incredibly grateful for the life that I have and I’ve learned to not allow the insecurities of others to infiltrate that joy.” 1. On my nightstand: a Bible (that I have read from cover to cover—it was a resolution a few years back and I am so glad that I …

TueNight 10: Jennifer Garam

Quick Bio: Jennifer Garam is a Brooklyn-based writer and editor. Some of her favorite pieces  include a personal essay/reported article about how to grow out gray hair, a satire piece about if people had honest first date conversations, and a blog post about how to keep writing when no one gives a shit. Beyond the bio: “At the beginning of this past October, one month after my 43rd birthday, I was diagnosed with Stage 3 ovarian cancer. This came as a complete shock. I was in what I thought was perfect health, and had basically just had stomach pains and bloating for a week. Also, I thought that there was no cancer in my family and just didn’t think I was at risk for ever getting it. After I was diagnosed I dug a little deeper and discovered that there was a history of cancer in my family. Additionally, I got a genetic test and the results showed that I’m BRCA1 positive. This experience has obviously turned my life upside down and prompted me to reevaluate my priorities and …

TueNight 10: Marjorie Ingall

Age: 52 Quick Bio: Columnist for Tablet Magazine; author of Mamaleh Knows Best (she will come speak to your synagogue or JCC!); frequent contributor to the New York Times Book Review; and co-creator of SorryWatch, the web site devoted to all of your apology analysis needs. Beyond the Bio: “I have responded to going gray by adding MORE GRAY. More precisely, white — I added a fake white streak in the front of my hair. I was going for Susan Sontag, but have heard Rogue from X-Men and Alexandra the villain on Josie and the Pussycats, which are fine too. My aunt has a gorgeous cloud of white curls, and that is my #hairgoals, but my hair colorist says it is too soon.” 1. On the nightstand: Fenty Stunna lip paint in Uncuffed, a birthday present to myself. Sorry About That: The Language of Public Apology by Edwin L. Battistella. Current issue of The New Yorker. Spiral notebook made out of a vintage light pink, orange, and hot pink children’s book (anthology published in 1960 by Doubleday, just looked). Hedy Lamarr: An Incredible Life by William Roy & Sylvain Dorange. …

I Wish I Could Forget My Memory Lapses

My friends and I have started to lose our memories. Not in a drastic, “Where do I live again?” type of way. Or even in a milder, “Ohhh, my bra goes on the inside of my shirt” type of way. We’ve just started to have a few memory  — lapses. Like when I was telling my friend Jane a story about an old job of mine, and it was making her laugh until I said, “So I asked my boss John… shit, what was his last name again?” and then we had to suffer through a two-minute lull while I looked up at the ceiling and she looked down at her fingernails before I finally huffed, “GAWD, never mind.” Jane didn’t care about this interruption, but I did because trying to remember that guy’s name totally wrecked the flow of my anecdote. And it’d been a good anecdote up until that point. Maybe one of my best. But what I’ve come to realize is that these pauses that happen when women of a certain age try to recall …

TueNight 10: Bridgett Davis

Quick Bio: Bridgett M. Davis is the author of two novels, and a new memoir, The World According To Fannie Davis: My Mother’s Life In The Detroit Numbers, which is about how her mother ran an illegal lottery business from their home, giving her family a middle-class life. She’s a professor at Baruch College, CUNY, where she teaches creative writing courses and directs a writer-in-residence program. In the late 90’s, she wrote & directed a feature film, Naked Acts. Beyond the Bio: “I’m in full pre-book tour mode right now — thinking a lot about packing! Excited to connect with readers on the road. Life in my 40s was certainly full and amazing — rearing young children will do that for you. But life now, in my 50s, feels like coming into my own. I’ve hit a sweet spot. I finally feel confident about myself as a writer, and that’s freed me to allow my creativity to flourish in other ways. In fact, most people don’t know this about me, but I create collage art. My writing is …

TueNight 10: Sue Kramer

Quick Bio: Sue Kramer is an accomplished writer, director, producer and founder of connecting dots guru, a bespoke branding agency seen through a film director’s eyes. Her film Gray Matters (starring Heather Graham, Bridget Moynahan, Tom Cavanagh, Molly Shannon, Alan Cumming, and Sissy Spacek) is newly streamable on Amazon Prime. Beyond the Bio: “Post 40 is the best time of my life. Post labor pain. Post divorce. Post insecure about most. It’s the dawning of the age of empowerment. I love being over 40 because I finally own myself and own my body! This is it. I’m much more confident about who I am in this world, where I fit in and what I have to offer. I’m also less shy to ask for things, both in business, emotionally and sexually.  Post 40 is not mid life crisis time, it’s actually time to move out of the carpool lane and put the pedal to the metal in the fast lane.” 1. On the nightstand: The Cost of Living by Deborah Levy, How to be Happy by Lama Zopa Rinpoche and G’morning G’night by Lin-Manuel Miranda, and Vanity Fair. …

TueNight 10: Wendi Aarons

Quick bio: Humor writer, mother, curmudgeon, Democrat in Texas. Also the social media director for The Conferences for Women, and working on few projects including a book about being old and mean. Beyond the Bio: “The last fun thing I did was drink a few glasses of wine and apply to clinical studies at my dermatologist’s office. Fingers crossed that I’m wrinkled enough to get in! Otherwise, I’m trying hard to keep my sense of humor in our current political climate. I find myself nostalgic for the days when my biggest worry was if I’d be able to get Wham!’s new cassette before they were sold out. But, I keep my sanity via a lot of reading, watching movies that don’t star Reese Witherspoon, and listening to gospel music, which is kind of weird for an agnostic, but what can I say, I enjoy music that inspires you to enthusiastically clap.” 1. On the nightstand: Right now, Circe. 2. Can’t stop/won’t stop: Watching The Real Housewives. I CAN’T QUIT YOU, RAMONA SINGER. 3. Jam of the minute: “Can You Feel It” …